Question about 2001 Audi TT

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Burning out 150 amp fuse in fuse center

Heavy black cable that connects to 150 amp fuse strip in fuse center gets very hot and melts wire insulation on wire. Where does this cable go?

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ALTERNATOR MY FRIEND.........CHECK WIRING AND REPLACE ALTERNATOR IF NEEDED....IF U NEED MORE HELP LET ME KNOW..

Posted on Apr 28, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Why is my jumper cables sparking and over heating when trying to jump my car off


If it is sparking, then you are not connecting the cables correctly. Visually check that the cables are not damaged. Make sure both cars are not touching, put the red wire to the positive post of the battery and the black wire to the frame of the car. Connect the dead battery first. Wear gloves and goggles to be safe.

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Replace 15 amp fuse to a 30


NO,NO,NO ! Fuses are electrical protection for the cars wiring installing a higher amp-age fuse takes longer to blow so your wiring gets hotter and starts to melt the insulation and shorts to other wires eventually burning up the harness. With a amp meter test the circuit to see how much power is needed to keep the circuit going if over rated (15 amp circuit taking 20 amps) then install a cycling circuit breaker 10 amp this will blow and cool and blow again continually then with a magnetic amp meter (Gauss meter) you can locate your short the source voltage causes the amp meter to jump as the fault occurs when you pass it meter will stop working.

Apr 22, 2014 | 2002 Ford Escape

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Car dashboard lights wont turn on and smell of burning wires


If you're smelling insulation burning - STOP. Fuses should be blowing before insulation melts / burns.

Have the car checked my a trusted mechanic before using anything in the car that makes the wiring burn or melt.

Apr 16, 2014 | 2001 Ford Taurus

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I have an 84 impala and my alternator belt snapped off. Once i replaced the alternator belt, the car started and drove fine except my horn, interior lights, head lights, and tail lights don't work. I...


Circuit Breakers

Print
One device used to protect electrical components from burning out due to excessive current is a circuit breaker. Circuit breakers open and close the flow path for the electricity rapidly in order to protect the circuit if current is excessive. A circuit breaker is used on components which are more likely to draw excessive current such as the breaker found in the light switch that protects the headlight circuit. A separate 30 amp breaker mounted on the firewall or fuse block protects the power window and seat circuits, as applicable.

Fusible Links

Print
A fusible link is a protective device used in an electrical circuit and acts very much like a standard fuse. The major difference lies in that fusible links are larger and capable of conducting a higher amperage than most fuses. When the current increases beyond the rated amperage for a given link, the fusible metal of the wire link will melt, thus breaking the electrical circuit and preventing further damage to any other components or wiring. Whenever a fusible link is melted because of a short circuit, correct the cause before installing a new one. Most models have four fusible links.
REPLACING FUSIBLE LINKS

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable, followed by the positive cable. If the link is connected to the junction block or starter solenoid, disconnect it there as well.
  2. Cut the wiring harness right behind the link connector(s) and remove.
  3. Strip the insulation off the harness wire back 1 / 2 in (12.7mm).
  4. Position the clip around the new link and wiring harness or new connector and crimp it securely. Then, solder the connection, using rosin core solder and sufficient heat to guarantee a good connection. Repeat for the remaining connection.
  5. Tape all exposed wiring with electrical tape or use a heat shrink tube, if available. Where necessary, connect the link to the junction block or started solenoid. Reconnect the positive, followed by the negative battery cables.

Oct 21, 2013 | 1984 Chevrolet Impala

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Fussable link removal


To repair any blown fuse link use the following procedure:








  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.


  2. Cut the damaged fuse link from the wiring harness and discard it. If the fuse link is one of three circuits fed by a single feed wire, cut it out of the harness at each splice end and discard it.


  3. Identify and procure the proper fuse link with butt connectors for attaching the fuse link to the harness.


  4. To repair any fuse link in a 3-link group with one feed:


    1. After cutting the open link out of the harness, cut each of the remaining undamaged fuse links close to the feed wire weld.


    2. Strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the detached ends of the two good fuse links, Then insert two wire ends into one end of a butt connector and carefully push one stripped end of the replacement fuse link into the same end of the butt connector and crimp all three firmly together.





Care must be taken when fitting the three fuse links into the butt connector as the internal diameter is a snug fit for three wires. Make sure to use a proper crimping tool. Pliers, side cutter, etc. will not apply the proper crimp to retain the wires and withstand a pull test.





    1. After crimping the butt connector to the three fuse links, cut the weld portion from the feed wire and strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the cut end. Insert the stripped end into the open end of the butt connector and crimp very firmly.


    2. To attach the remaining end of the replacement fuse link, strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the wire end of the circuit from which the blown fuse link was removed, and firmly crimp a butt connector or equivalent to the stripped wire. Then, insert the end of the replacement link into the other end of the butt connector and crimp firmly.


    3. Using rosin core solder with a consistency of 60 percent tin and 40 percent lead, solder the connectors and the wires at the repairs then insulate with electrical tape or heat shrink tubing.




Heat shrink tubing must be slipped over the wire before crimping and soldering the connection.



  1. To replace any fuse link on a single circuit in a harness, cut out the damaged portion, strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the two wire ends and attach the appropriate replacement fuse link to the stripped wire ends with two proper size butt connectors. Solder the connectors and wires, then insulate.


  2. To repair any fuse link which has an eyelet terminal on one end such as the charging circuit, cut off the open fuse link behind the weld, strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the cut end and attach the appropriate new eyelet fuse link to the cut stripped wire with an appropriate size butt connector. Solder the connectors and wires at the repair, then insulate.


  3. Connect the negative battery cable to the battery and test the system for proper operation.



Do not mistake a resistor wire for a fuse link. The resistor wire is generally longer and has print stating, "Resistor-don\'t cut or splice\'\'.

When attaching a single No. 16, 17, 18 or 20 gauge fuse link to a heavy gauge wire, always double the stripped wire end of the fuse link before inserting and crimping it into the butt connector for positive wire retention.

May 04, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

92 grand marquis i have 1 wire and fuse that keeps gettin hot and the fuse keeps blowin. the wire has melted down into where it connects to the back of the fuse box. It get very, very hot at the connection...


you have a slow short in system this can cause a fire you need to determine what circuit it is and check for either a defective part also bad electrical connection you will need to possibly replace the wire or insulate it after cause is found

Jun 30, 2012 | 1992 Mercury Grand Marquis

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Im trying to hotwire my blower motor directly to my battery and a toggle switch. the problem is the wires keep geting so hot they start to melt the insulation. what can i do to wire it correcty?


go to any auto parts store and buy a heavy duty wire. this should fix the problem. because the blower motor, is pulling to much power when its on. the best way is to put a fuse in the line between the battery and toggle switch. this way if it shorts out, it will blow the fuse try a 20 amp fuse if this is not enough. go to a 30 amp. Good-day !

Aug 25, 2011 | Dodge Dynasty Cars & Trucks

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The flat fuses in the vw 2001 beetle, the ones on top of the battery, keep burning holes in the fuse box, i have to replace the hold box, the black wire burns a whole through the box, what size fuse do...


Check the battery conections for cleanlyness and tightness and the connections for the fuse. There should be no heat there. The 150 amp sound OK. Look at the connection on the starter as well.

Jul 19, 2011 | 2001 Volkswagen Beetle

1 Answer

I am looking for a diagram with labeling for a ''under the hood'' fuse box on a 1995 F250 7.3 Diesel . I've a electical leak that I've tracked to this fuse box and two specific fuses, but don't know what...


Two circuits are protected by circuit breakers located in the fuse panel: the power windows (20 amp) or power windows and Shift-On-The-Fly (30 amp) and the power door locks (30 amp). The breakers are self-resetting.
The fuse link is a short length of special, Hypalon (high temperature) insulated wire, integral with the engine compartment wiring harness and should not be confused with standard wire. It is several wire gauges smaller than the circuit which it protects. Under no circumstances should a fuse link replacement repair be made using a length of standard wire cut from bulk stock or from another wiring harness.
To repair any blown fuse link use the following procedure:
  1. Determine which circuit is damaged, its location and the cause of the open fuse link. If the damaged fuse link is one of three fed by a common No. 10 or 12 gauge feed wire, determine the specific affected circuit.
  2. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  3. Cut the damaged fuse link from the wiring harness and discard it. If the fuse link is one of 3 circuits fed by a single feed wire, cut it out of the harness at each splice end and discard it.
  4. Identify and procure the proper fuse link and **** connectors for attaching the fuse link to the harness.
  5. To repair any fuse link in a 3-link group with one feed:
    1. After cutting the open link out of the harness, cut each of the remaining undamaged fuse links close to the feed wire weld.
    2. Strip approximately 1/2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the detached ends of the 2 good fuse links. Then insert 2 wire ends into one end of a **** connector and carefully push one stripped end of the replacement fuse link into the same end of the **** connector and crimp all three firmly together.
      Care must be taken when fitting the 3 fuse links into the **** connector as the internal diameter is a snug it for 3 wires. Make sure to use a proper crimping tool. Pliers, side cutters, etc. will not apply the proper crimp to retain the wires and withstand a pull test.
    3. After crimping the **** connector to the 3 fuse links, cut the weld portion from the feed wire and strip approximately 1/2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the cut end. Insert the stripped end into the open end of the **** connector and crimp very firmly.
    4. To attach the remaining end of the replacement fuse link, strip approximately 1/2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the wire end of the circuit from which the blown fuse link was removed, and firmly crimp a **** connector or equivalent to the stripped wire. Then, insert the end of the replacement link into the other end of the **** connector and crimp firmly.
    5. Using rosin core solder with a consistency of 60 percent tin and 40 percent lead, solder the connectors and the wires at the repairs and insulate with electrical tape.
  6. To replace any fuse link on a single circuit in a harness, cut out the damaged portion, strip approximately 1/2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the 2 wire ends and attach the appropriate replacement fuse link to the stripped wire ends with 2 proper size **** connectors. Solder the connectors and wires and insulate the tape.
  7. To repair any fuse link which has an eyelet terminal on one end such as the charging circuit, cut off the open fuse link behind the weld, strip approximately 1/2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the cut end and attach the appropriate new eyelet fuse link to the cut stripped wire with an appropriate size **** connector. Solder the connectors and wires at the repair and insulate with tape.
  8. Connect the negative battery cable to the battery and test the system for proper operation.
Do not mistake a resistor wire for a fuse link. The resistor wire is generally longer and has print stating, "Resistor: don't cut or splice



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Mar 06, 2010 | 1995 Ford F250

1 Answer

No spark produced by my distributor on my '93. V6 Mazda MX6


sorry i could no doubt sort it but i would need car in front of me,check the ignition module which could be in the dist or under the coil first before you start playing with the wires ,but yes sounds like the other wires could be an isolator switch or boy racer weekend mechanic alarm,dont know why people are guilled and fooled into fitting these useless things they always go wrong and have to be removed,cant beat a decent steering wheel antitheft lock.

Mar 11, 2009 | 1993 Mazda MX-6

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