Question about 1989 Ford Thunderbird

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I am leaking coolant in the front not at the radiator but close too it. Is it the hose or the water pump?

I also hear a humming noise that seems to be coming from the same area is that a good indicator that it is in fact the water pump? I just bought the car and couldn't tell you the last time it was changed if ever.

Posted by Anonymous on

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Put a piece of cardboard under the car. Then look down at the cardboard from above the the area. You can see where the drops are in relation to the hose or water pump or other spot.
I do that for locating oil leaks.
Hope this helps.

Posted on Apr 08, 2015

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Its the weep hole on bottom side of your water pump. The bearings are about to go bad on pump. Time to replace water pump

Posted on Apr 17, 2015

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Replace water pump if there's noise...

Posted on Apr 08, 2015

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Water pump would screech more than humm...as they start to fail...serious grinding occurs when they are failing eminently. THe water pump is connected to the fan, and would leak under it when the seal fails...check directly under the water pump at the "weep" hole for signs of coolant green color or rust.

If your leak is not on the radiator itself, check to see if the hoses are "spongy"(soft not firm),...if so they should be replaced.

Check the coolant reserve bottle, and the overflow hose to coolant reservoir for signs of age.

Posted on Apr 08, 2015

  • Anonymous Apr 12, 2015

    The hum was the pcv valve it had the original factory one on it. My leak hasn't dripped since that one day I don't know where it's coming from I took a hour drive the other day and it used a lot of coolant but still no drip

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1 Answer

Losing a lot of coolant. I don't see a leak. I started to drain the system and it smells burnt to s**t. What might my problem and possible solutions be?


see this causes and fix it. God bless you
Water pump -- A bad shaft seal will allow coolant to dribble out of the vent hole just under the water pump pulley shaft. If the water pump is a two-piece unit with a backing plate, the gasket between the housing and back cover may be leaking. The gasket or o-ring that seals the pump to the engine front cover on cover-mounted water pumps can also leak coolant. Look for stains, discoloration or liquid coolant on the outside of the water pump or engine.
Radiator -- Radiators can develop leaks around upper or loser hose connections as a result of vibration. The seams where the core is mated to the end tanks is another place where leaks frequently develop, especially on aluminum radiators with plastic end tanks. On copper/brass radiators, leaks typically occur where the cooling tubes in the core are connected or soldered to the core headers. The core itself is also vulnerable to stone damage. Internal corrosion caused by old coolant that has never been changed can also eat through the metal in the radiator, causing it to leak.
Most cooling systems today are designed to operate at 8 to 14 psi. If the radiator can't hold pressure, your engine will overheat and lose coolant.
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A cracked cylinder block will cause either:
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2 Inspect Head Gasket - Leaking Head Gasket.
3 Inspect Radiator - Leaking Radiator Hose(s).
4 Inspect Radiator Cap - Worn or Damaged Radiator Cap.
5 Inspect Radiator Hose - Ruptured, Cracked or Leaking Radiator Hose.
6 Inspect Freeze Plug - Leaking Freeze Plug(s).
7 Inspect Intake Manifold Gasket - Leaking, Worn, or Damaged Intake Manifold Gasket.
8 Inspect Water Outlet - Cracked, Leaking or Damaged Water Outlet.
9 Inspect Heater Control Valve - Leaking or Faulty Heater Control Valve.
10 Inspect Radiator Drain Pepcock - Loose, Damaged, or Faulty Radiator Drain Pepcock, or Pepcock O-ring.
11 Inspect Engine (DOMESTIC ONLY) - Cracked Cylinder Block Leaking Coolant into at least one Cylinder, causing white exhaust smoke.

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