Question about 2005 Ford Freestar

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Why doesn't the cooling fan turn on, causing the engine to overheat?

When I unplug the cht sensor it runs. Changed cht sensor

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2 Answers

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  • Contributor
  • 33 Answers

Check your thermostat it my not opening all the way

Posted on Apr 07, 2015

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  • Ford Master
  • 21,873 Answers

Generally, the sensor is not telling the computer to activate the fan relay. Since you unplugged the sensor and forced the fan to run, we know the sensor, fan motor, and relay work.
So it could be a problem with what the sensor is telling the engine computer, or a circulation problem.

Posted on Apr 07, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

whytfang
  • 170 Answers

SOURCE: 1991 Ford Escort fan will not turn on and motor overheats.

some water from the tail pipe is normal but if the car is running bad then it is possible the head gasket is blown. on the escorts that i have owned i have found that the main relay is usually burned and needs to be replaced. it is possible that the fan is dragging and burning this relay up if this relay is good then you may be better off taking it to the electrical shop.

Posted on Apr 24, 2009

  • 33 Answers

SOURCE: cooling low fan is not working

May need to get your radiator flushed and or change your thermostat.

Posted on May 19, 2009

  • 236 Answers

SOURCE: engine overheats and cooling fan cuts off

try to replace the hoses, they may be collapsing, then replace the thermostat, and give it a radiator flush to clear any possible clogs in the lines, last thing i would say is to replace the fan

Posted on Jun 24, 2009

  • 154 Answers

SOURCE: coolant temp sensor

no this is not true if you Unplug the coolant temperature sensor while the engine is running. This should cause the fans to turn on low then kick to high

Typically when the engine computer loses the signal from the coolant temp sensor, it just turns both fans on high so the engine will not overheat. i hope this helped you.

Posted on Apr 25, 2010

Testimonial: "thanks for the info and quick response, guess its time to dig deeper into this overheating problem. titswiggle dave"

  • 524 Answers

SOURCE: HAVE A '93 ESCORT, 1.9CID THE COOLING FAN WILL NOT

hi

did you check weather power is coming to the fan. please use the multimeter to check the power available.if the power is available to the fan wire then check the terminals to which it has been connected.

hi if you feel the information which i gave is useful please vote me

Posted on Jul 10, 2010

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I have a 2000 crown vic and my coolant fan wont come on unless i cut the a/c on or unplugged the cylinder head sensor i changed thermostat and temp sensor it still same thing what could be the problem


You have a wiring problem from sensor to the PCM - engine computer .
DL22 CHECK CHT SIGNAL CIRCUIT FOR SHORT TO GROUND
    Note: Refer to the PCM connector pin numbers in the beginning of this pinpoint test.
  • Disconnect PCM.
  • Measure resistance between CHT signal and SIG RTN circuits and then between CHT signal and PWR GND circuits at the PCM harness connector.
  • the PCM is what controls the cooling fan !
  • This Pinpoint Test is intended to diagnose the following:
    • Cylinder head temperature (CHT) sensor (6G004)
    • Harness circuits: CHT, VREF, and SIG RTN
    • Powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650)

    Tables and Graphs

    On applications that do not use a ECT sensor, the CHT sensor is used to determine the engine coolant temperature in place of the ECT sensor. In this case the PCM may store both CHT and ECT Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs). To cover the entire temperature range of both the CHT and ECT sensors, the PCM has a dual switching resistor circuit on the CHT input. A graph showing the temperature switching from the COLD END line to the HOT END line with increasing temperature and back with decreasing temperature is included. Note the temperature to voltage overlap zone. Within this zone it is possible to have either a COLD END or HOT END voltage at the same temperature. For example, at 90°C (194 °F) the voltage could read either 0.60 volt or 3.71 volts. Refer to the table for the temperature to voltage expected values.
    Voltage values were calculated for VREF = 5.0 volts. These values can vary 15 percent due to sensor and VREF variations.
  • DL1 DTC P1288 OR P1116: CHECK OPERATION OF CYLINDER HEAD TEMPERATURE SENSOR
    • Run engine at 2000 rpm until engine temperature becomes stabilized.
    • No Starts or Vehicle that Stalls:
      • GO to DL3 .
    • Check that upper radiator hose is hot and pressurized.
    • Rerun Key On Engine Running (KOER) Self-Test.
    Is DTC P1288 or P1116 present? Yes No GO to DL2 . Engine temperature was not stabilized. REPAIR any other DTCs as necessary. DL2 CHECK VREF CIRCUIT VOLTAGE AT TP SENSOR
    • Refer to schematic at the beginning of this pinpoint test.
    • Disconnect throttle position (TP) sensor.
    • Key on, engine off.
    • Measure the voltage between VREF and SIG RTN circuits at the TP sensor harness connector.
    Is voltage between 4.0 volts and 6.0 volts? Yes No There is sufficient VREF voltage. RECONNECT TP sensor. GO to DL3 . GO to C1 . DL3 CHECK RESISTANCE OF CYLINDER HEAD TEMPERATURE SENSOR WITH ENGINE OFF
    • Disconnect CHT sensor.
    • Measure resistance between CHT signal and SIG RTN pins at the CHT sensor. Refer to the table at the beginning of this pinpoint test for resistance specifications.
    Is resistance within specification? Yes No For No Starts or Stalls, RETURN to Section 3 , Symptom Charts.

    All others, GO to DL4 . REPLACE CHT sensor. You need a scan tool to do some of these tests
  • DL4 CHECK RESISTANCE OF CHT SENSOR WITH ENGINE RUNNING
      Note: Verify that engine is at operating temperature before taking CHT readings.
    • Run engine for two minutes at 2000 rpm.
    • Measure resistance between CHT signal and SIG RTN pins at the CHT sensor. Refer to the table at the beginning of this Pinpoint Test for resistance specifications.
    • Key off.
    Is resistance within specification? Yes No REPLACE PCM (refer to Section 2, Flash Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory (EEPROM) ). REPLACE CHT sensor. DL5 DTC P1289 OR P1290: ACCESS CHT PID AND CHECK VOLTAGE
    • Connect scan tool.
    • Key on, engine off.
    • Access CHT V PID.
    Is the CHT V PID less than 0.2 volt? Yes No GO to DL6 . GO to DL7 . DL11 CHECK CHT SENSOR SIGNAL AND SIG RTN CIRCUITS FOR OPEN IN HARNESS
      Note: Refer to the PCM connector pin numbers in the beginning of this pinpoint test.
    • Disconnect PCM.
    • Measure resistance of CHT circuit between PCM harness connector pin and CHT sensor harness connector.
    • Measure resistance of SIG RTN circuit between PCM harness connector pin and CHT sensor harness connector.
    Is each resistance less than 5.0 ohms? Yes No REPLACE PCM (refer to Section 2, Flash Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory (EEPROM) ). REPAIR open circuits. free wiring diagrams at www.bbbind.com

Jul 13, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cooling problem,code#P1299,on a 06 Ford Escape 2.3l


P1299 - Cylinder Head Over Temperature Protection Active Description: Indicates an engine overheat condition was detected by the cylinder head temperature (CHT) sensor. An FMEM strategy called fail-safe cooling was activated to cool the engine. Possible Causes:
  • Engine cooling system concerns
  • Low engine coolant level
  • Base engine concerns
Diagnostic Aids: Refer to Section 1, Powertrain Control Software , for more information on the fail-safe cooling strategy and cylinder head temperature sensor. Application Key On Engine Off Key On Engine Running Continuous Memory All GO to Pinpoint Test DL .


Feb 19, 2015 | 2006 Ford Escape

1 Answer

This isn't the hottest it gets. It goes all the way up to almost the red. It's over heating and we have changed the water pump,


A water pump in itself WILL NOT cause and engine to overheat, if it leaks badly and the coolant level drop very low then this will indirectly cause the engine to run hot or overheat. What I see in the video clip is NOT overheating, the fan doesn't come on until the engine reaches about 230 Degrees Fahrenheit, that is pretty well up about where the needle is in the video, if the cooling fan never kicks on after about 20 minutes of idle or doesn't engage when the AC (this assumes the AC is working)n issue.

Oct 04, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Replaced thermastat but still overheating


OK, you have addressed the first possibility. There are a few more, each progressively more expensive to fix. First, are the radiator electric cooling fans operating? If you find the vehicle runs ok on the highway, but overheats around town in stop-and-go traffic, it could be that the fans are not running. Quick check for the fans - with the ignition on (the engine doesn't need to be running), move the cooling control to the A/C position. If the fans come on, they are good, but you could still have a fan-related cooling problem. If the fans don't work, you have a problem. If the fans worked, the car runs fine at highway speed but not in town, then suspect the coolant sensor that engages the fans. If the fans work and the car overheats in all conditions, then a system blockage is possible. Blockages occur usually one of two ways: Radiator rust/corrosion, and collapsed radiator hoses. Radiator corrosion will require radiator replacement; if it is blocked badly enough to overheat, flushing it is a waste of effort, and could cause more problems with all the **** you circulate into the engine. If the system is low on water (air in system) it can rise to the top radiator hose and cause it to collapse partially or fully, restricting flow. Some engines have water jackets that extend higher than the radiator cap, so they can trap air. These cars have bleeder ports at these locations to remove to trapped air. Check to see if that is the problem.

Dec 17, 2011 | 2001 Chevrolet Lumina

1 Answer

Fans will not turn on therefore cause vehicle to overheat


cooling fan will not come on until about 230 degrees, if fans still do not work. check the fuses and relay. if ok then run a wire to fan from battery.on fan side connection, run a wire from battery positive to fan connection. run a wire from negative to ground connection.if fan will not come on it is either bad or the coolant temp, sensor is bad. because this sensor send info to pcm from various running conditions. it is very important that this sensor works. it can cause;
  • Extended crank time when the engine is cold
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Spark knock
  • Lack of engine power
  • Erratic and/or high idle
  • Engine cooling fan stays running all the time
  • Engine cooling fan fails to turn on
  • Engine overheating
  • Jun 20, 2010 | 1996 Nissan Sentra

    2 Answers

    It has an overheating problem. I changed the


    SOUND LIKE COOLING FANS NOT RUNNING CHECK AND SEE DOES COOLING FANS TURN ON WHEN ENGINE OVERHEATS IF NOT CHECK COOLING FANS FUSE AND RELAY IF BOTH CHECKS OUT GOOD HOT WIRE COOLING FAN.IF IT WORKS.PROBLEM COULD BE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR- PCM- AND OPEN OR SHORT IN WIRES.IF COOLING FAN DONT WORK WHEN YOU HOT WIRE IT PROBLEMS THE FAN MOTOR.

    May 27, 2010 | 2001 Chevrolet Malibu

    2 Answers

    Coolant temp sensor


    NO, the sensor is good.

    Apr 25, 2010 | 1997 Ford Taurus

    1 Answer

    2003 Ford Taurus will not rev above 3000 RPM


    you have a rev limiter in neutral. Is that when this happens?

    Engine RPM/Vehicle Speed Limiter The powertrain control module (PCM) will disable some or all of the fuel injectors whenever an engine rpm or vehicle overspeed condition is detected. The purpose of the engine rpm or vehicle speed limiter is to prevent damage to the powertrain. The vehicle will exhibit a rough running engine condition, and the PCM will store a Continuous Memory DTC P1270. Once the driver reduces the excessive speed, the engine will return to the normal operating mode. No repair is required. However, the technician should clear the PCM and inform the customer of the reason for the DTC.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Fail-Safe Cooling Strategy The fail-safe cooling strategy is activated by the PCM only in the event that an overheating condition has been identified. This strategy provides engine temperature control when the cylinder head temperature exceeds certain limits. The cylinder head temperature is measured by the Cylinder Head Temperature (CHT) sensor. For additional information about the CHT sensor, refer to PCM Inputs for a description of the CHT sensor. Note: Not all vehicles equip with a CHT sensor will have the fail-safe cooling strategy.
    A cooling system failure such as low coolant or coolant loss could cause an overheating condition. As a result, damage to major engine components could occur. Along with a CHT sensor, the fail-safe cooling strategy is used to prevent damage by allowing air cooling of the engine. This strategy allows the vehicle to be driven safely for a short time with some loss of performance when a overheat condition exist.
    Engine temperature is controlled by varying and alternating the number of disabled fuel injectors. This allows all cylinders to cool. When the fuel injectors are disabled, their respective cylinders work as air pumps, and this air is used to cool the cylinders. The more fuel injectors that are disabled, the cooler the engine runs, but the engine has less power.
    Note: A wide open throttle (WOT) delay is incorporated if the CHT temperature is exceeded during WOT operation. At WOT, the injectors will function for a limited amount of time allowing the customer to complete a passing maneuver.
    Before injectors are disabled, the fail-safe cooling strategy alerts the customer to a cooling system problem by moving the instrument cluster temperature gauge to the hot zone and a PCM DTC P1285 is set. Depending on the vehicle, other indicators, such as an audible chime or warning lamp, can be used to alert the customer of fail-safe cooling. If overheating continues, the strategy begins to disable the fuel injectors, a DTC P1299 is stored in the PCM memory, and a malfunction indicator light (MIL) (either CHECK ENGINE or SERVICE ENGINE SOON), comes on. If the overheating condition continues and a critical temperature is reached, all fuel injectors are turned off and the engine is disabled.

    Mar 15, 2009 | 2003 Ford Taurus

    2 Answers

    95 grand am radiator fan only runs with AC on


    Cooling Fan Temp Sensor is the First thing You Check (with what you have described) Cooling Fan Should ALways come On When The A/C is turned On as A/C Adds A Load to Engine, If Temp Sensor is Faulty it Will Not Give GROUND Signal to ECM >For COOLING FAN >RELAY to Give ground and turn ON The Fan.
    There ARE 2 temp Sensors that Serve Different Purposes 1 is for Dash READING GAGE & Or TEMP LIGHT the Other is For ECM or Fan Relay (SAME Thing) you Said>""can disconnect the sensor and fan continues to run" < This Leads me to think you Changed the Wrong One. Not Questioning your Skills Just Here to Help.
    TEMP SENSOR FOR 3.1L V6 is Located upper RH rear of engine compartment, near exhaust system. Temp SENSOR for 2.3L Engine is Located in LH rear of engine compartment.
    I Hope this Helps Lead you to a NON-OVERHEATING Pontiac.
    Good Luck and Have A Great Evening. rejakwilson

    Feb 04, 2009 | 1995 Pontiac Grand Am

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