Question about 2005 Nissan Frontier

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There is a vacuum line behind the air cleaner on my 4.0 that is not connected to anything. Does it connect to the air cleaner

I am thinking it is evap system connection Thanks

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  • Nissan Master
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If car is fueling good or has no engine lite....dont sweat....or buy a haynes manual at zone for details on engine

Posted on Mar 30, 2015

Testimonial: "It fuels good and know code lights are on. I have a Haynes manual but there is no hose diagram in it. Thanks"

  • Arnie Burke
    Arnie Burke Mar 30, 2015

    library sec629 has chilton shop books

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Vacuum. Diagram for a 2002 jeep grand cherokee 4.0


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On 4.0L 6 cylinder engines, a molded vacuum tube connects manifold vacuum to top of cylinder head (valve) cover at dash panel end. The vacuum fitting contains a fixed orifice of a calibrated size. It meters the amount of crankcase vapors drawn out of the engine.

On 2.5L 4 cylinder engines, a fitting on drivers side of cylinder head (valve) cover contains the metered orifice. It is connected to manifold vacuum.

A fresh air supply hose from the air cleaner is connected to front of cylinder head cover on 4.0L engines. It is connected to rear of cover on 2.5L engines.

When the engine is operating, fresh air enters the engine and mixes with crankcase vapors. Manifold vacuum draws the vapor/air mixture through the fixed orifice and into the intake manifold. The vapors are then consumed during combustion.

Mar 08, 2015 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I need a vacuum line diagram fo a 1996 Chevy Lumina, 3.1. One line that is not connected to anything, is located at the top of the engine.


Sorry I don't have the diagram, but I do have a diagram of the engine and component locations. Your vacuum system is fairly simple. You have a MAP sensor attached to the air cleaner. I have pasted a picture below. It has one electrical connector and one vacuum hose that goes to the intake manifold or the throttle body.
Behind the right headlight is your evap canister. This will have a hose or line running to the fuel tank. Then it will have another hose going to the purge valve. The purge valve should be close by and it has a connector plus another hose that goes to the intake manifold.
Then you have the PCV hose that goes from the PCV valve in the valve cover to the air cleaner or intake manifold. I think yours just has a hose from the air cleaner and the rest is internal.
There is one more vacuum hose, and that is the bog one that goes from the intake manifold (or throttle body--looks to me like there are a couple of vacuum ports on the back side of the throttle body, and there may be a "T" on one of the hoses) to the brake booster. It this one was off, the engine would not run, as the vacuum draw is large. Please let me know if you cannot figure it out from these instructions and provide a picture, if you can.

MAP sensor:
jturcotte_653.jpg

purge valve:
jturcotte_654.jpg

jturcotte_2455.gif
jturcotte_2456.gif

Oct 30, 2011 | 1996 Chevrolet Lumina Mini

1 Answer

Surging idle 2003 nissan altima s


I think you have an air leak, a vacuum line loose, or possible intake manifold gasket leaking, maybe your big air intake hose is leaking. spray carb cleaner or soapy water around mating surface of intake and on vacuum lines and connections. If idle changes, there is your leak. good luck.

Oct 27, 2011 | 2005 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

I have a 1999 GMC YUKON. About a year ago I broke down in snowshoe WV the fuel pump was bad so after I installed new fuel pump this problem has occurrence ever sense. At a stop light it bucks bogs and...


Check the Oxygen sensors, as they control gas to air ratio. By spider do you mean the Coil Pack? Cam Sensor and Crank sensor? What about a vacuum leak?

You are going to cuss me for this but, according to your description, this did not occur BEFORE you changed the pump, and you have changed it twice. Are you sure you hooked up the external tank and EVAP lines correctly? Are any of the rubber hose's under there rotten? The EVAP system use's vacuum to pull fumes from the gas tank. The EVAP canister is probably behind one of the rear wheels, and up behind the rear fender. Check those hose's too. Check the intake manifold vacuum lines and connectors for leaks and cracks. Better yet, inspect all your vacuum lines.

Aug 27, 2011 | 1999 GMC Yukon

1 Answer

Hyundai santafe 2004 how to fix p0456...or what are ur suggestions for repair? i was advised to change the gas cap!


Here's the procedure:

Purge Control Solenoid Valve (PCSV) Line Inspection
1. Ignition "OFF".
2. Disconnect the hose leading from the PCSV to the intake manifold at PCSV.
3. Using a vacuum pump, apply specified vacuum(Approx. 15 in, Hg) to the manifold side of the valve and verify PCSV holds vacuum.
4. Ignition "ON" & Engine "OFF".
5. Install scantool and select "EVAP PURGE VALVE" on the Actuation Test mode.
6. Activates "EVAP PURGE VALVE" by pressing "STRT(F1)" key.
7. Verify PCSV release vacuum while valve is activating(should hear a faint click from PCSV).
8. Repeat this procedure 4 or 5 times to ensure PCSV reliability.
9. Is PCSV working properly?
YES
? Go to "Canister Closing Valve(CCV) Line Inspection" procedure.
NO
? Verify arrow on PCSV is pointing towards intake manifold. If it is not, reverse installation. Reinstall as necessary.
? If OK, check for cracks or damage in hose connecting PCSV and intake manifold. Repair or replace as necessary.
? If OK, test with a new PCSV and check for proper operation. If problem is corrected, replace PCSV and go to "Verification of Vehicle Repair" procedure.
Canister Closing Valve(CCV) Line Inspection
1. Return vehicle to original condition.
2. Ignition "OFF".
3. Disconnect the hose connecting Canister Closing Valve(CCV) to canister.
4. Blow air to the canister side of the valve and verify air escapes to the air filter side.
5. Turn ignition on and jumper a wire to GND(back probe) at terminal 2 of the ECM connector(CCV valve should click).
6. Blow air into hose and verify air does not escape.
7. Repeat this procedure 4 or 5 times to ensure CCV reliability.
8. Is CCV working properly?
YES
? Go to "Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor Inspection" procedure.
NO
? Check for cracks or damage in hose connecting CCV and canister. Repair or replace as necessary.
? If OK, replace CCV. If CCV was stuck closed, inspect all lines and canister for liquid fuel. Replace any contaminated components and blow out lines and go to "Verification of Vehicle Repair" procedure.
Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor Inspection
1. Start engine and install scan tool.
2. Monitor "FUEL TANK PRESSURE" parameter on the current data list with depressing increasing engine speed.
Specification : Signal value will vary between -2mmHg to 2 mmHg depending on variation in engine speed.
A. Approx. 0~2 mmHg(2.5V) at Ig. On
B. Approx. 0 mmHg at 1400rpm .
C. Approx. -2 mmHg at 4000rpm.

3. Is signal value within specification?
YES
? Go to "PCSV to Canister Line Inspection" procedure.
NO
? Check for cracks or damage in hose connecting canister and fuel pump. Repair or replace as necessary.
? Check for open or short in FTPS harness. Repair as necessary.
If OK, test with a new FTPS and check for proper operation. If problem is corrected, replace FTPS and go to "Verification of Vehicle Repair" procedure.
PCSV to Canister Line Inspection
1. Check for leakage in hose.
(1) Disconnect the hose leading from the canister to the PCSV at canister.
(2) Using a vacuum pump, apply specified vacuum[Approx. 10cmHg(4 inHg)] to the manifold side of the valve and verify PCSV holds vacuum.
(3) Monitor vacuum pressure for 1 minute. After 1 minute, pressure should not drop more than 2cmHg(0.8 inHg).
(4) Is pressure within specification?
YES
? Go to "2. Check for leakage in canister" procedure.
NO
? Check for cracks or damage in hose connecting PCSV and canister. Repair or replace as necessary and go to "Verification of Vehicle Repair" procedure.

2. Check for leakage in canister.


Thoroughly check all fuel vapor hoses and hose clamps between:
1. Canister and fuel tank.
2. Canister and CCV.
3. Canister and PCSV.

If NG, replace hose or clamps as necessary and go to "Verification of Vehicle Repair" procedure.
If OK, go to next step as below.
(1) Disconnect hose clamps and remove canister assembly .
(2) Block the hose of between:
A. Canister and fuel filler neck.
B. Canister and CCV.
C. Canister and PCSV.

(3) Apply maximum of 10cmHg(4 inHg) pressure through fuel tank port from canister.
(4) With system sealed and pressurized, check for leaks.
(5) Were any leak(s) found?
YES
? Repair or replace leaking system component(s) and go to "Verification of Vehicle Repair" procedure.
NO
? Go to "Fuel Tank Line Inspection" procedure.

Fuel Tank Line Inspection
1. Relieve the fuel system pressure and remove the fuel tank.


Before removing the fuel tank, make sure the fuel hoses are not leaking.

2. Block all of the following outlets:
(1) Fuel lines.
(2) Fuel filler neck.

3. Apply maximum of 10cmHg(4 inHg) pressure to the EVAP. hose at the fuel tank. Then, pinch the EVAP. hose to retain the pressure.
4. Check the suspect area for leaks with a soap solution.
5. Were any leak(s) found?
YES
? Repair or replace leaking system component(s) and go to "Verification of Vehicle Repair" procedure.
NO
? Check for poor connection between ECM and component: backed out terminal, improper mating, broken locks or poor terminal to wire connection. Repair as necessary and go to "Verification of Vehicle Repair" procedure.

Jun 30, 2011 | 2003 Hyundai Santa Fe

2 Answers

My 1995 subaru legacy lsi cuts out when I rev the engine around 1 rpm. Plus the check engine light is on. I took it to the dealership and they couldn't fix it, but they got a code from the check engine...


code p 0441 refers to evaporative emission (EVAP) system --incorrect flow detected ==== causes --- hose connection/s--- intake leak---EVAP canister purge valve replace the purge valve

May 21, 2017 | 1995 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

Leak detection pump sw or mechanical fault


can be caused by failure of the evaporation system leak detection pump or reed switch. When you turn your key on, the LDP sometimes comes on briefly to pressurize the fuel tank. The PCM enables a solenoid value in the pump to allow engine vacuum to shift a diaphram that pressurizes the system. Locate the LDP if the left rear bumper/fender well. With the engine running, remove the vacuum hose to see if vacuum from the engine is being supplied to the pump. If not, check the hose connection at the engine intake manifold. Repair or replace the hose as necessary to restore vacuum to the LDP.
If the engine vacuum is present, the problem may be with the pump or the electrical power to the pump solenoid. You can check the power to the solenoid by removing the connector and probing the connector with a 12 volt test light. Connect the test light clip to a ground point on the frame and probe the cable terminals. With the car running, one of the terminal should light the test light. If not, the problem is the wiring to the alternator. If the test light comes on, replace the LDP. Please let me know if you have any questions.


EVAP Leak Detection Pump Description & Operation
The evaporative emission system is designed to prevent the escape of fuel vapors from the fuel system. Leaks in the system, even small ones, can allow fuel vapors to escape into the atmosphere. Government regulations require onboard Testing to make sure that the evaporative (EVAP) system is functioning properly. The leak detection system tests for EVAP system leaks and blockage. It also performs self-diagnostics. During self-diagnostics, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) first checks the Leak Detection Pump (LDP) for electrical and mechanical faults. If the first checks pass, the PCM then uses the LDP to seal the vent valve and pump air into the system to pressurize it. If a leak is present, the PCM will continue pumping the LDP to replace the air that leaks out. The PCM determines the size of the leak based on how fast/long it must pump the LDP as it tries to maintain pressure in the system.
The main purpose of the LDP is to pressurize the fuel system for leak checking. It closes the EVAP system vent to atmospheric pressure so the system can be pressurized for leak Testing. The diaphragm is powered by engine vacuum. It pumps air into the EVAP system to develop a pressure of about 0.25 psi. A reed switch in the LDP allows the PCM to monitor the position of the LDP diaphragm. The PCM uses the reed switch input to monitor how fast the LDP is pumping air into the EVAP system. This allows detection of leaks and blockage.
The LDP assembly consists of several parts. The solenoid is controlled by the PCM, and it connects the upper pump cavity to either engine vacuum or atmospheric pressure. A vent valve closes the EVAP system to atmosphere, sealing the system during leak Testing. The pump section of the LDP consists of a diaphragm that moves up and down to bring air in through the air filter and inlet check valve, and pump it out through an outlet check valve into the EVAP system. The diaphragm is pulled up by engine vacuum, and pushed down by spring pressure, as the LDP solenoid turns on and off.
The LDP also has a magnetic reed switch to signal diaphragm position to the PCM. When the diaphragm is down, the switch is closed, which sends a 12v (system voltage) signal to the PCM. When the diaphragm is up, the switch is open, and there is no voltage sent to the PCM. This allows the PCM to monitor LDP pumping action as it turns the LDP solenoid on and off.
Diaphragm Downward Movement
Based on reed switch input, the PCM de-energizes the LDP solenoid, causing it to block the vacuum port, and open the atmospheric port. This connects the upper pump cavity to atmosphere through the EVAP air filter. The spring is now able to push the diaphragm down. The downward movement of the diaphragm closes the inlet check valve and opens the outlet check valve pumping air into the evaporative system. The LDP reed switch turns from open to closed, allowing the PCM to monitor LDP pumping (diaphragm up/down) activity.
During the pumping mode, the diaphragm will not move down far enough to open the vent valve. The pumping cycle is repeated as the solenoid is turned on and off. When the evaporative system begins to pressurize, the pressure on the bottom of the diaphragm will begin to oppose the spring pressure, slowing the pumping action. The PCM watches the time from when the solenoid is de-energized, until the diaphragm drops down far enough for the reed switch to change from opened to closed. If the reed switch changes too quickly, a leak may be indicated. The longer it takes the reed switch to change state, the tighter the evaporative system is sealed. If the system pressurizes too quickly, a restriction somewhere in the EVAP system may be indicated.
Diaphragm Upward Movement
When the PCM energizes the LDP solenoid, the solenoid blocks the atmospheric port leading through the EVAP air filter and at the same time opens the engine vacuum port to the pump cavity above the diaphragm. The diaphragm moves upward when vacuum above the diaphragm exceeds spring force. This upward movement closes the vent valve. It also causes low pressure below the diaphragm, unseating the inlet check valve and allowing air in from the EVAP air filter. When the diaphragm completes its upward movement, the LDP reed switch turns from closed to open.

Removal & Installation
The Leak Detection Pump (LDP) is located under the left quarter panel behind the left/rear wheel. It is attached to a two-piece support bracket. The LDP and LDP filter are replaced (serviced) as one unit.

  1. Remove stone shield behind left/rear wheel. Drill out plastic rivets for removal.
  2. Remove 3 LDP mounting bolts.
  3. Remove support bracket brace bolt.
  4. Loosen, but do not remove 2 support bracket nuts at frame rail.
  5. To separate and lower front section of two-piece support bracket, remove 3 attaching bolts on bottom of support bracket. While lowering support bracket, disconnect LDP wiring clip.
  6. Disconnect electrical connector at LDP.
  7. Carefully remove vapor/vacuum lines at LDP.
  8. Remove LDP.

To Install:
  1. Position LDP and carefully install vapor/vacuum lines to LDP and LDP filter.
    WARNING The vapor/vacuum lines and hoses must be firmly connected. Check the vapor/vacuum lines at the LDP; LDP filter and EVAP canister purge solenoid for damage or leaks. If a leak is present, a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) may be set.
  2. Connect electrical connector to LDP.
  3. While raising front section of support bracket, connect LDP wiring clip.
  4. Install 3 LDP mounting bolts.
  5. Join front and rear sections of two-piece support bracket by installing 3 bolts on bottom of support bracket. Do not tighten bolts at this time.
  6. Install support bracket brace bolt. Do not tighten bolt at this time.
  7. Tighten 2 support bracket nuts at frame rail and 3 support bracket bolts and brace bolt.
  8. Position stone shield behind left/rear wheel. Install new plastic rivets.
  9. jturcotte_55.gif

Nov 05, 2010 | 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

3 Answers

Emission control malfuction p0440


Easier said then done without professional tools

However, I'll start you will some theory, then the shop manual procedures followed by some "common" problems

Theory:
Evaporative leak detection strategy is based on applying vacuum to EVAP system and monitoring vacuum decay. Powertrain Control Module (PCM) monitors vacuum level by means of fuel tank vacuum sensor input. At a predetermined time, EVAP purge solenoid and EVAP vent solenoid are turned on. This allows engine vacuum to draw a small vacuum on entire EVAP system. Whenever a sufficient vacuum level cannot be achieved, a large leak or faulty EVAP purge solenoid is indicated.

Conditions for setting this DTC are as follows:
No TP sensor, ODM, IAT sensor, or MAP sensor DTCs present.
Start-up ECT 40-86°F (4-30°C).
Start-up ECT not greater than 14°F (8°C) greater than start-up IAT.
Start-up IAT not greater than 4°F (2°C) of start-up ECT.
Fuel tank level is 15-85 percent.
BARO is greater than 75 kPa.
Vehicle has been driven at least 11 miles.
EVAP system is unable to achieve or maintain vacuum during diagnostic test.

Diagnostic Procedures
1.) Perform On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) system check.
After performing OBD system check, go to next step.

2.) Check if DTC P1665 or P1676 is also set. If any of DTCs is present, diagnose affected DTCs. If DTCs are not present, go to next step.

3.) Turn ignition off. Remove fuel filler cap. Turn ignition on. Using scan tool, observe fuel tank pressure. If fuel tank pressure is zero in. H2O, go to next step. If fuel tank pressure in not zero in. H2O, diagnose evaporative system.

4.) Replace fuel filler cap. Using scan tool, capture FAILURE RECORD data for DTC P0440 and clear DTC. Command EVAP vent solenoid on. Connect EVAP Pressure/Purge Diagnostic Station (J-41413) to EVAP service port. Pressurize EVAP system using diagnostic station. Monitor pressure on EVAP pressure gauge on diagnostic station. If pressure is 5 in. H2O, go to next step. If pressure is not 5 in. H2O, go to step 6.

5.) Maintain EVAP pressure at 5 in. H2O. Observe fuel tank pressure on scan tool. If fuel tank pressure reading on scan tool is 5 in. H2O, go to step 8. If reading is not 5 in. H2O, go to next step.

6.) Disconnect fuel tank vapor line and EVAP purge line from EVAP canister. Block canister fitting for fuel tank pressure line. Connect a hand-held vacuum pump to canister fitting for EVAP purge line. Ensure that EVAP vent solenoid is still commanded on. Apply vacuum to EVAP canister. If vacuum can be maintained at 5 in. Hg, go to step 11. If vacuum cannot be maintained at 5 in. Hg, go to step 10.

7.) Check for restriction in fuel tank vapor line or EVAP purge line. Repair as necessary. After repairs, go to step 16. If restriction is not found, diagnose EVAP system.

8.) Disconnect vacuum source line at EVAP purge solenoid and plug vacuum source fitting on solenoid. Using scan tool's output tests function, select and activate SYSTEM PERF. Pressurize EVAP system to 5 in H2O. Observe EVAP pressure gauge on diagnostic station while removing plug from EVAP purge solenoid vacuum source fitting. If EVAP pressure decreases to zero in. H2O within 15 seconds while system performance is activated, go to next step. If EVAP pressure does not decrease to zero in. H2O within 15 seconds, go to step 13.

9.) Install vacuum gauge on EVAP diagnostic station to vacuum source line. Start and operate engine to greater than 2000 RPM. Observe source vacuum level. If vacuum level is greater than -15 in. Hg, If vacuum level is not greater than -15 in. Hg, go to step 14.

10.) Check for disconnected or damaged vent hose. Check for damaged EVAP canister. Repair as necessary. After repairs, go to step 16. If no problems are found, go to next step.

11.) Check for faulty or missing fuel filler cap. Check for disconnected or leaking fuel tank vapor line. Check for disconnected or damaged EVAP purge line. If problem is found, repair as necessary. After repairs, go to step 16. If no problems are found, go to next step.

12.) Using scan tool, command EVAP vent solenoid on. Continuously attempt to pressurize the EVAP system by leaving the EVAP diagnostic station control knob in the pressurized position. Using the Ultrasonic Leak Detector (J-41416), locate and repair leak in EVAP system. After repairs, go to step 16.

13.) Replace EVAP purge solenoid. After replacing solenoid, go to step 16.

14.) Check for carbon release into the EVAP system. Repair as necessary. After repairs, go to step 16.

15.) Replace EVAP vent solenoid. After replacing solenoid, go to next step.

15.) Turn ignition on. Using scan tool, command EVAP vent solenoid on. Using EVAP diagnostic station, pressurize EVAP system to 15 in. H2O. Move rotary switch in diagnostic station to HOLD and observe EVAP pressure gauge. If EVAP pressure decreases to less than 10 in. Hg within 2 minutes, repeat step 3. If EVAP pressure does not decrease, system is okay.

Diagnostic Aids
Check for the following:
Cracked or punctured EVAP canister.
Damaged or disconnected source vacuum line, EVAP purge line, vent hose, for fuel tank vapor line.
Poor connection at PCM.
Inspect harness connectors for backed-out terminals, improper mating, broken lock, damaged terminals, or poor wire connection.
Check for intermittent in circuit.
Check for kinked, pinched or plugged vacuum lines to EVAP purge or fuel tank vapor line. Also check for restrictions.
Faulty or damaged evaporative canister.

Apr 28, 2010 | 1999 Buick Century

2 Answers

Error codes P0442 and P0455 in Dodge Dakota 2001


Hello shoretex...Yes sir you can repair this yourself...
p0442 is medium leak detected ...p0456 is small leak....and p0440 is a general evap system failure.. evap codes are a common thing. gas caps are an inexpensive place to start. There are two types of evap hoses on the Dodge... hard plastic and soft rubber.... before you replace parts check the soft rubber first at the evap cans and pump located about a foot in front of the gas tank fill pipe on trucks located next to the transfer case or right behind the trans on the driver side. hard plastic lines will brake or rub through...check spots where lines come in contact with anything. this is a common thing with older trucks...hair line cracks will kick a p0442 code, and a p0445 code...When you find a leak, repair it, and rescan...sometimes there are several leaks, continue with inspection and repairs until you get it all fixed up.... Remember..start at simple and work from there...
i will post the evap. system in more detail to help you troubleshoot the problem.
EVAP System: The Evaporative Emission (EVAP) Control system used on all vehicles is the charcoal canister storage method. This method transfers fuel vapor from the fuel tank to an activated carbon (charcoal) storage device (canister) to hold the vapors when the vehicle is not operating. When the engine is operating, the fuel vapor is purged from the carbon element by intake air flow and consumed in the normal combustion process. The evaporative system includes the following components: *Fuel tank *Evaporative emission canister vent solenoid *Fuel tank pressure sensor *Fuel pipes and hoses *Vapor lines *Fuel cap *Evaporative emission canister *Purge lines *Purge valve solenoid EVAP System Operation: The EVAP purge solenoid valve allows manifold vacuum to purge the canister. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) supplies a ground to energize the EVAP purge solenoid valve (purge on). The EVAP purge solenoid control is Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) or turned on and off several times a second. The EVAP canister purge PWM duty cycle varies according to the operating conditions determined by the mass air flow, the fuel trim, the engine coolant temperature, and the intake air temperature. For certain EVAP tests, the diagnostic will be disabled if the TP angle increases to above 75% . The evaporative leak detection diagnostic strategy is based on applying vacuum to the EVAP system and monitoring for vacuum decay. The fuel level sensor input to the PCM is used to determine if the fuel level in the tank is correct to run the EVAP diagnostic tests. To ensure sufficient volume in the tank to begin the various diagnostic tests, the fuel level must be between 15% and 85% . The PCM monitors the fuel tank pressure/vacuum level via the fuel tank pressure sensor input. Results of Incorrect Operation: Poor idle, stalling and poor driveability can be caused by the following: *Malfunctioning purge solenoid. *Damaged canister. *Hoses/lines split, cracked and/or not connected properly. Evidence of fuel loss or fuel vapor odor can be caused by the following: *Liquid fuel leaking from the fuel lines *Cracked or damaged canister *Inoperative canister control valve Vacuum hoses that are: *Disconnected *Mis-routed *Kinked *Deteriorated *Damaged The evaporative leak detection diagnostic strategy is based on applying vacuum to the EVAP system and monitoring vacuum decay. The PCM monitors vacuum level via the fuel tank pressure sensor input. At an appropriate time, the EVAP purge solenoid and the EVAP vent solenoid are turned on, allowing engine vacuum to draw a small vacuum on the entire evaporative emission system. After the desired vacuum level has been achieved, the EVAP purge solenoid is turned off, sealing the system. A leak is detected by monitoring for a decrease in vacuum level over a given time period, all other variables remaining constant. A small leak in the system causes DTC P0442 to be set. If the desired vacuum level cannot be achieved in the test described above, a large leak or a faulty EVAP purge solenoid is indicated. This can be caused by the following conditions: *Disconnected or faulty fuel tank pressure sensor. *Missing or faulty fuel cap. *Disconnected, damaged, pinched, or blocked EVAP purge line. *Disconnected or damaged EVAP vent hose. *Disconnected, damaged, pinched, or blocked fuel tank vapor line. *Disconnected or faulty EVAP canister solenoid. *Disconnected or faulty EVAP vent solenoid. *Open ignition feed circuit to the EVAP vent or purge solenoid. *Damaged EVAP canister. Any of the above conditions sets DTC P0440. A restricted or blocked EVAP canister vent path is detected by drawing vacuum into the EVAP system. The PCM turns off the EVAP vent solenoid and the EVAP purge solenoid (EVAP vent solenoid Open, EVAP purge PWM 0% ). The PCM monitors the fuel tank pressure sensor input. With the EVAP vent solenoid open, any vacuum in the system should decrease quickly unless the vent is blocked. A blockage is caused by the following conditions: *Faulty EVAP vent solenoid (stuck closed). *Plugged, kinked, or pinched vent hose. *Shorted EVAP vent solenoid driver circuit. *Plugged evaporative canister.

Good luck shoretex, hope this helps...please take time to rate me a fixya.

Jul 20, 2009 | 2001 Dodge Dakota

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