Question about 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe

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When I go to accelerate no power. WHEN i tryed to get on the freeway it took 3/4 mile to get up to 60 mph foot on the floor.

I have changed the fuel pump,removed the guts from both catalytic converters.

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Replace the cat converters as the oxygen sensors need them to adjust the ECM program to give you power
Instead of wasting money ,it is better to just have the fault codes read so that you can find where the problem is exactly

Posted on Mar 30, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I ask a question on what is the drive cycle to reset obd for toyota2005 rav4


Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle
  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion-not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
  • Step Four: More City Driving
    • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
    • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
    • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
    Step Five: Have your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
    • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
    • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.

Feb 21, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to do the drive cycle of a 1996 Nissan pathfinder


How to Perform a Basic Drive Cycle


Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle

  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion-not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
Step Four: More City Driving
  • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
  • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
  • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
Step Five: Wave your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
  • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
  • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.
  • If your monitors are not ready, please click here for more information.

May 26, 2016 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to do the drive cycle on a 1996 nissan pathfinder


How to Perform a Basic Drive Cycle


Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle

  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion-not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
Step Four: More City Driving
  • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
  • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
  • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
Step Five: Wave your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
  • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
  • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.
  • If your monitors are not ready, please click here for more information.

May 26, 2016 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Car accelerated on its own


most likely the pedal get caught by the floormat. Try adjusting your floormat.

Apr 30, 2012 | 1998 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Golf SE 1.8l 1781 cc auto, constant jerking. Have tried all possibles suggestions but still not fixed


try this to see if it gets any better,from stop.put into drive and let car accelerate without gas(do not touch gas pedal) around 30/35 mph is about right.STOP.then use 1/3rd gas(keep foot still)and do same(around 60/70 mph)STOP. then foot to floor and go to max legal speed.then back off to 1/3rd pedal.then stop.you have just reset computerised gearbox settings.(only use 1/3rd gas for about 250miles,and you will feel the difference(boring)but saves you a fortune in fuel costs.and if you still have problem put on diagnostic to check out.

Aug 11, 2010 | Volkswagen Golf Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Reset computer in doege stratus wont pass inspection drove 50 miles and computer still didnt reset help


U have to operate the engine at all kinds of diff speeds and drive modes, it is called a OBDII drive cycle, here is how u do one.
1. As soon as the engine starts, idle the engine in drive for two and a half minutes with the A/C and rear defrost on. OBDII checks oxygen sensor heater circuits, air pump and EVAP purge.

2. Turn the A/C and rear defrost off, and accelerate to 55 mph at half throttle. OBDII checks for ignition misfire, fuel2_bing.gif trim and canister purge.

3. Hold at a steady state speed of 55 mph for three minutes.

OBDII monitors EGR, air pump, O2 sensors and canister purge.

4. Decelerate (coast down) to 20 mph without braking or depressing the clutch. OBDII checks EGR and purge functions.

5. Accelerate back to 55 to 60 mph at half throttle. OBDII checks misfire, fuel trim and purge again.

6. Hold at a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for five minutes.

OBDII monitors catalytic converter efficiency, misfire, EGR, fuel trim, oxygen sensors and purge functions.

7. Decelerate (coast down) to a stop without braking. OBDII makes a final check of EGR and canister purge

Jun 02, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Stratus

1 Answer

It only comes on when I am on the freeway @ 60 mph. Driving on local streets there isn't any "problem". I took the car to an emmissions testing facilty where it passed the test.


add a can of SEAFOAM to a tank or at least 1/2 tank of Premium gas. later change the fuel filter, and see how that does. ethanol gas problem #99. add a can of SEAFOAM every 3000 miles and it will cure your emission.fuel and engine ping, and carbon problems.

Aug 30, 2009 | Audi 100 Cars & Trucks

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'02' Chevy Malibu loss of power


how it seems that your problem is in the tranmission. has the transmission ever had the fluid changed in it? if not then i would have it checked out and changed. it might even be a bad sensor causing the engine to free spin and not engage the transmission i would defently have the transmission checked out.

Jun 09, 2009 | 2002 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

Loss of Power at Freeway Speeds


Sounds like itr is not getting enough fuel. Try or check the fuel filter for dirt or water, and also check the fuel pump pressure to see if it meet factory specs.
Good Luck Jerry
jerry1938@hotmail.com

Dec 13, 2008 | 2004 GMC Envoy

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