Question about 1997 Toyota 4Runner

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My 97 4runner 2.7Liter has all four cylinders misfiring. Is there a common problem that causes all four to start misfiring at the same time?

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  • Toyota Master
  • 21,873 Answers

Have you checked spark to the plugs and the fuel injector circuits ?

Posted on Mar 28, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 65 Answers

SOURCE: Firefire in cylinder four / random misfires

Its not likley to be an injector fault.the air mass meter is far more common.if you unplug it it defaults to a average value and should improve the way it runs if that is the problem.

Posted on May 21, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: what would cause a cylinder 5 misfire in my 2002

04jeeplibertypo305changedinj coil plug counters stayed high for #5 saw spikes on other cyls changed chk sensor no spikes on any misfire counter a week later back with a po 305 ?

Posted on Jul 24, 2010

SOURCE: 1998 Toyota T 100 6 cyl. 2 wheel drive Autozone

I would go with the ones autozone gave to you.then I would check the coil packs for those 2 cylinders and see if that's the problem. If that ain't the problem then I would check the crank sensor

Posted on May 26, 2011

yegarboy
  • 286 Answers

SOURCE: Misfire problems on my 2006 Dodge Stratus SXT 2.4l DOHC

Thats exactly what it sounds like.

Posted on Dec 13, 2011

  • 428 Answers

SOURCE: I have a 2002 f-150

If IT Say,s That Ya Just Better Change them All Cause You Probably Have lot,s Of KM,s On It And they All Will Be Doin The Same Very Soon

Posted on Mar 04, 2015

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Mercury cougar 1997 flashing engine light


When your engine light flashes about 95 percent of the time (f not more) means that your vehicles computer (PCM) has detected a misfire and that the misfire at the time it is flashing that the misfire is bad enough to cause damage like to the catylist converter(s), oxygen sensor and a number of other things. You need to find out which cylinder has the misfire. You can go to your local auto parts store and most of them will pull diagnostic trouble codes (DTC\'s) for free. Now once you get the DTC(s) you can narrow down whcih cylinder(s) has the misfire by what DTC they pulled. For example a DTC of P0301 means a misfire in cylinder 1, P0302 would be cylinder #2 and so forth. A P0300 means multiple random misfire a much further testing needs to be done in order to diagnose. Say you have a P0301, depending on your engine size you will need to isolate cylinder # 1 to diagnose. If you have a 3.8 liter engine in most cases it\'s the fuel injector ot a bad spark plug wire for that cylinder that is bad but if you have the 4.6 liter most common cause is a bad ignition coil for that cylinder as they have a seperate coil for each cylinder but it could be an injector too instead of the coil. I\'m just giving you the most common causes but diagnosing needs to be done in order to replace the faulty part(s). Other causes of a misfire are crank or cam position sensors, a vacuum leak, Faulty spark plug wire (if you have the 3.8), engine problems (internal), electrical and/or wiring problem or even the PCM. Many other things can cause this, these are the most common. Gatting that DTC is vital in order to diagnose. If you need further help as far as testing procedures once you get any DTC\'s I\'ll be happy to helps you diagnose the problem. Hope I was able to help you understand what\'s going on...

Oct 10, 2013 | 1997 Mercury Cougar XR7

1 Answer

Spark jumping from coil pack causing the engine to miss


Hi there:
Misfire is a common driveability problem that may or may not be easy to diagnose, depending on the cause. A misfiring cylinder in a four-cylinder engine is, pardon the pun, hard to miss. The loss of 25 percent of the engine power output is the equivalent of a horse trying to run on three legs. The engine may shake so badly at idle that it causes vibrations that can be felt in the steering wheel and throughout the vehicle.



Basically, it's one of three things: loss of spark; the air/fuel mixture is too far out of balance to ignite; or loss of compression. Loss of spark includes anything that prevents coil voltage from jumping the electrode gap at the end of the spark plug. Causes include worn, fouled or damaged spark plugs, bad spark plug wires or even a cracked distributor cap. A weak coil or excessive rotor gas inside a distributor would affect all cylinders, not just a single cylinder.


Lean misfire can occur when the air/fuel mixture is too lean (not enough gasoline in the mixture) to burn. This can be caused by a dirty, clogged or inoperative fuel injector; air leaks; or low fuel pressure because of a weak pump, restricted filter or leaky pressure regulator. Low fuel pressure would affect all cylinders rather than an individual cylinder, as would most air leaks. A leaky EGR valve can also have the same effect as an air leak. In fact, if a vehicle has one or more misfire codes and a P0401 EGR code, the fault is likely carbon buildup under the EGR valve.


Loss of compression means the cylinder loses most of its air/fuel mixture before it can be ignited. The most likely causes here are a leaky (burned) exhaust valve or a blown head gasket. If two adjacent cylinders are misfiring, it's likely the head gasket between them has failed. Also, if an engine is overheating or losing coolant, it's likely the head gasket is the culprit.

Intermittent misfires are the worst kind to diagnose because the misfire comes and goes depending on engine load or operating conditions. They seem to occur for no apparent reason. The engine may only misfire and run rough when cold but then smooth out as it warms up. Or, it may start and idle fine but then misfire or hesitate when it comes under load. Also, it may run fine most of the time but suddenly misfire or cut out for no apparent reason.


Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 18, 2012 | Ford Mustang Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

98 ford mustang spark jumping from coil pack


Hi there:
Misfire is a common driveability problem that may or may not be easy to diagnose, depending on the cause. A misfiring cylinder in a four-cylinder engine is, pardon the pun, hard to miss. The loss of 25 percent of the engine power output is the equivalent of a horse trying to run on three legs. The engine may shake so badly at idle that it causes vibrations that can be felt in the steering wheel and throughout the vehicle.



Basically, it's one of three things: loss of spark; the air/fuel mixture is too far out of balance to ignite; or loss of compression. Loss of spark includes anything that prevents coil voltage from jumping the electrode gap at the end of the spark plug. Causes include worn, fouled or damaged spark plugs, bad spark plug wires or even a cracked distributor cap. A weak coil or excessive rotor gas inside a distributor would affect all cylinders, not just a single cylinder.


Lean misfire can occur when the air/fuel mixture is too lean (not enough gasoline in the mixture) to burn. This can be caused by a dirty, clogged or inoperative fuel injector; air leaks; or low fuel pressure because of a weak pump, restricted filter or leaky pressure regulator. Low fuel pressure would affect all cylinders rather than an individual cylinder, as would most air leaks. A leaky EGR valve can also have the same effect as an air leak. In fact, if a vehicle has one or more misfire codes and a P0401 EGR code, the fault is likely carbon buildup under the EGR valve.


Loss of compression means the cylinder loses most of its air/fuel mixture before it can be ignited. The most likely causes here are a leaky (burned) exhaust valve or a blown head gasket. If two adjacent cylinders are misfiring, it's likely the head gasket between them has failed. Also, if an engine is overheating or losing coolant, it's likely the head gasket is the culprit.


Intermittent misfires are the worst kind to diagnose because the misfire comes and goes depending on engine load or operating conditions. They seem to occur for no apparent reason. The engine may only misfire and run rough when cold but then smooth out as it warms up. Or, it may start and idle fine but then misfire or hesitate when it comes under load. Also, it may run fine most of the time but suddenly misfire or cut out for no apparent reason.




Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 18, 2012 | Ford Mustang Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Spark jumping from coil pack


Hi there:
Misfire is a common driveability problem that may or may not be easy to diagnose, depending on the cause. A misfiring cylinder in a four-cylinder engine is, pardon the pun, hard to miss. The loss of 25 percent of the engine power output is the equivalent of a horse trying to run on three legs. The engine may shake so badly at idle that it causes vibrations that can be felt in the steering wheel and throughout the vehicle.


Basically, it's one of three things: loss of spark; the air/fuel mixture is too far out of balance to ignite; or loss of compression. Loss of spark includes anything that prevents coil voltage from jumping the electrode gap at the end of the spark plug. Causes include worn, fouled or damaged spark plugs, bad spark plug wires or even a cracked distributor cap. A weak coil or excessive rotor gas inside a distributor would affect all cylinders, not just a single cylinder.

Lean misfire can occur when the air/fuel mixture is too lean (not enough gasoline in the mixture) to burn. This can be caused by a dirty, clogged or inoperative fuel injector; air leaks; or low fuel pressure because of a weak pump, restricted filter or leaky pressure regulator. Low fuel pressure would affect all cylinders rather than an individual cylinder, as would most air leaks. A leaky EGR valve can also have the same effect as an air leak. In fact, if a vehicle has one or more misfire codes and a P0401 EGR code, the fault is likely carbon buildup under the EGR valve.

Loss of compression means the cylinder loses most of its air/fuel mixture before it can be ignited. The most likely causes here are a leaky (burned) exhaust valve or a blown head gasket. If two adjacent cylinders are misfiring, it's likely the head gasket between them has failed. Also, if an engine is overheating or losing coolant, it's likely the head gasket is the culprit.

Intermittent misfires are the worst kind to diagnose because the misfire comes and goes depending on engine load or operating conditions. They seem to occur for no apparent reason. The engine may only misfire and run rough when cold but then smooth out as it warms up. Or, it may start and idle fine but then misfire or hesitate when it comes under load. Also, it may run fine most of the time but suddenly misfire or cut out for no apparent reason.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 18, 2012 | 1998 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

My girlfriend has a 99 pontiac grand am with the 2.4 l an has a cylinder number 2 misfire .. it spits an spudders out exhaust any ideas where to start ?


Plugs, a coil tower, and four spark plug boots would be a good start. Wery common for the towers to go bad on these.

Jan 13, 2012 | Pontiac Grand Am Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Misfire #4 p0304 engine is sluggish.rough idle at times


Check the coil, a good test is to change the coil with another cylinder and see if the misfire moves to that cylinder, if it moves then you will know its the coil make sure to mark it so you know which one to replace, this is very common for coils to go bad, heres a diagram to help you locate #4 cylinder.couldnt get diagram but if its a four cylinder then #4 is the last one back if its a 6 cylinder then it will be the first cylinder on the driverside .first cylinder from the front to rear,

Dec 12, 2010 | 2005 Ford Escape

1 Answer

Cylinder 1 misfire


Misfire codes (including P0301 (THIS WOULD BE YOUR CODE), P0302, P0303, P0304, P0305, P0306, P0307 & P0308) indicate that there is a misfire in a cylinder, the last number indicates which cylinder has the problem. If something is causing a miss in random cylinders or is affecting all of them, a P0300 misfire code will be stored in the car's computer. It's always smart to begin with the basics. Also consider the mileage and service history when diagnosing a misfire. Higher mile vehicles are more inclined to have mechanical issues with the engines, like low compression from worn valves or rings etc. Any accompanying codes should also be considered in case they may be related. If the spark plugs are worn (excessive gap) or the car is past due for a tune up, it may be smart to go ahead and start with spark plugs and spark plug wires and go from there.
The most common misfire causes on the cars I've worked on have been:
  1. Spark plugs
  2. Spark plug wires
  3. Ignition coil
  4. Fuel injector
  5. Wiring to fuel injector
  6. Timing Belt (IF EQUIPPED)
  7. Vacuum leak or stuck open EGR
  8. Contaminated fuel or bad fuel pump
  9. Weak compression
  10. Blown head gasket

Obviously there are many different types of cars, so a service manual for the specific one that you are working on may be required to help pinpoint the misfire you're looking for, but hopefully this will direct you to some of the most common causes of misfires in cars of today.
When diagnosing a SES light, it's best to start with a quick scan with a code reader. If checking the engine's mechanical integrity specialty tools, like a compression tester, an exhaust back pressure gage or cylinder leak down tester may be needed.

May 22, 2010 | 2001 Pontiac Grand Am SE

1 Answer

I am having ongoing problems with the truck miss firing and rough running. Timing is ok, replaced cap and rotor,coil. It still starts rough,idles rough and misses when at cruising speed,although it seems...


Misfire is a common driveability problem that may or may not be easy to diagnose, depending on the cause. A misfiring cylinder in a four-cylinder engine is, pardon the pun, hard to miss. The loss of 25% of the engine's power output is the equivalent of a horse trying to run on three legs. The engine may shake so badly at idle that it causes vibrations that can be felt in the steering wheel and throughout the vehicle. The engine also may be hard to start and may even stall at idle, depending on the accessory load (air conditioning, headlights and electric rear defroster, for example).

When misfire occurs, performance suffers along with fuel economy, emissions and idle quality. And, when a misfiring vehicle is subjected to an emissions test, it will usually fail because of the unusually high levels of hydrocarbons (HC) in the exhaust.

What causes a cylinder to misfire? Basically, it's one of three things: loss of spark; the air/fuel mixture is too far out of balance to ignite; or loss of compression. Loss of spark includes anything that prevents coil voltage from jumping the electrode gap at the end of the spark plug. Causes include worn, fouled or damaged spark plugs, bad spark plug wires or even a cracked distributor cap. A weak coil or excessive rotor gas inside a distributor would affect all cylinders, not just a single cylinder.

"Lean misfire" can occur when the air/fuel mixture is too lean (not enough gasoline in the mixture) to burn. This can be caused by a dirty, clogged or inoperative fuel injector; air leaks; or low fuel pressure because of a weak pump, restricted filter or leaky pressure regulator. Low fuel pressure would affect all cylinders rather than an individual cylinder, as would most air leaks. A leaky EGR valve can also have the same effect as an air leak.

Loss of compression means the cylinder loses most of its air/fuel mixture before it can be ignited. The most likely causes here are a leaky (burned) exhaust valve or a blown head gasket. If two adjacent cylinders are misfiring, it's likely the head gasket between them has failed. Also, if an engine is overheating or losing coolant, it's likely the head gasket is the culprit.

Intermittent misfires are the worst kind to diagnose because the misfire comes and goes depending on engine load or operating conditions. They seem to occur for no apparent reason. The engine may only misfire and run rough when cold but then smooth out as it warms up. Or, it may start and idle fine but then misfire or hesitate when it comes under load. Also, it may run fine most of the time but suddenly misfire or cut out for no apparent reason. Intermittent misfires can be a real challenge to diagnose, so let's start with a steady misfire in one cylinder before moving on to intermittent misfires.

Hope this help.

Mar 25, 2010 | 1989 GMC Sierra

1 Answer

Firefire in cylinder four / random misfires


Its not likley to be an injector fault.the air mass meter is far more common.if you unplug it it defaults to a average value and should improve the way it runs if that is the problem.

May 20, 2009 | 2003 Volkswagen Passat

5 Answers

Hi, I have a 1997 Porsche 993. Motronic 5.2 M07. I am getting these fault codes 1) 62 misfire emissions-relvant 2) 51 Cylinder 2 misfire emissions-relevant) 3) 54 Cylinder 5 misfire ...


misfire :-------- try checking your 02 sensors /fuel pump and filter.

for 51 cylinder misfire :---
Change the coil. Period. Very easy to remove from the vehicle if it's a 4 cyl. Follow that spark plug wire from the spark plug to the other end. What it's attached to you should replace
for 54 cylinder 5 misfire :---First you have to eliminate the most obvious problems, like spark plug and spark plug wire. If you replace those and you still have a misfire, then it's a good idea to look for a vacuum leak in the intake manifold

Mar 07, 2009 | Porsche 911 Cars & Trucks

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