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On a relay for a car I know there is normally closed and normally open what I want to know on the relay itself it has 1,2,3,4,or 85,86,87,87a,30 now on the diagram how do you tell if they are a normally open relay or a normally closed relay.Does anyone have a logical theory I would appreciate it.Thank You

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The diagram usually displays the relay when there is no power applied. The normally open contacts are the ones not making contact until the power is applied. So, for the normally closed ones, the contacts touch until the power is applied to the relay. I hope this is the explanation you are looking for. Take care!

Posted on Dec 13, 2014

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2006 Passat 3.6 Relay J271 ECU Location Look Everywhere But Cant Seem To Locate


if there is no legend on the relay cluster cover makes it very hard to locate

J271 varies from model to model, but once you have the relay out, check one of its sides for the diagram of the pin outs. The solenoid 12V supply will always be marked as 85, the negative always as 86, the normally open (N/O) contact as 87, the normally closed (N/C) as 87a and the pin marked 30 is always the switching voltage supply. Notice that terminals of 87 and 30 are always larger than the other terminals. Connect the relay solenoid to a battery with clip leads and measure the voltage at 87 and 87a, and that it changes over when you hear the relay click. Alternatively do a continuity test between pin 30 and 87, then again between 30 and 87a. Then connect power to the solenoid and the continuity measurement should switch over to the other pin. Unlike the image above, there may be even be more than 1 double pole double throw switch contacts on the relay depending on the model of your car. The Audi J271 is different to some VW's and has more terminals.
26329198-li4g2rdronquokdv0yx25uce-5-0.jpg

just look at the way VW put relay clusters into a passat ..what a mess

2006-passat-3-6-relay-j271-ecu-location-li4g2rdronquokdv0yx25uce-5-2_0.jpg

Oct 27, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

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Where is the location of my starter relay ********* fuse on a 2003 Chrysler Sebring sedan


WARNING: CHECK TO ENSURE THAT THE TRANSMISSION IS IN THE PARK/NEUTRAL POSITION WITH THE PARKING BRAKE APPLIED.

RELAY TEST
The starter relay is located in the Power Distribution Center (PDC) in the engine compartment. Refer to the PDC label for relay identification and location.

Remove the starter relay from the PDC as described to perform the following tests:
  1. A relay in the de-energized position should have continuity between terminals 87A and 30, and no continuity between terminals 87 and 30. If OK, go to Step 2. If not OK, replace the faulty relay.
  2. Resistance between terminals 85 and 86 (electromagnet) should be 75 ±5 ohms . If OK, go to Step 3. If not OK, replace the faulty relay.
  3. Connect a battery B+ lead to terminals 86 and a ground lead to terminal 85 to energize the relay. The relay should click. Also test for continuity between terminals 30 and 87, and no continuity between terminals 87A and 30. If OK, refer to Relay Circuit Test procedure. If not OK, replace the faulty relay.
RELAY CIRCUIT TEST
  1. The relay common feed terminal cavity (30) is connected to battery voltage and should be hot at all times. If OK, go to Step 2. If not OK, repair the open circuit to the PDC fuse as required.
  2. The relay normally closed terminal (87A) is connected to terminal 30 in the de-energized position, but is not used for this application. Go to Step 3.
  3. The relay normally open terminal (87) is connected to the common feed terminal (30) in the energized position. This terminal supplies battery voltage to the starter solenoid field coils. There should be continuity between the cavity for relay terminal 87 and the starter solenoid terminal at all times. If OK, go to Step 4. If not OK, repair the open circuit to the starter solenoid as required.
  4. The coil battery terminal (86) is connected to the electromagnet in the relay. It is energized when the ignition switch is held in the Start position and the clutch pedal is depressed (manual trans). Check for battery voltage at the cavity for relay terminal 86 with the ignition switch in the Start position and the clutch pedal is depressed (manual trans), and no voltage when the ignition switch is released to the ON position. If OK, go to Step 5. If not OK, check for an open or short circuit to the ignition switch and repair, if required. If the circuit to the ignition switch is OK, see the Ignition Switch Test procedure.
  5. The coil ground terminal (85) is connected to the electromagnet in the relay. It is grounded through the transmission range sensor only when the gearshift selector lever is in the Park or Neutral positions. Check for continuity to ground at the cavity for relay terminal 85. If not OK with an automatic transmission, check for an open or short circuit to the transmission range sensor and repair. It is grounded by the PCM if the conditions are right to start the car. For automatic trans. cars the PCM must see Park Neutral switch and near zero engine rpm. For manual trans. cars the PCM only needs to see near zero engine rpm. To diagnose the Park Neutral switch of the trans range sensor refer to the transaxle section for more information. Check for continuity to ground while the ignition switch is in the start position. If not OK and the vehicle has an automatic trans. verify Park Neutral switch operation. If that checks OK check for continuity between PCM and the terminal 85. Repair open circuit as required. If OK, the PCM may be defective

location-starter-relay-big-black-fuse-gbf3labirtd4je1xpy3iayqy-4-0.jpg This should get you going on the diagnosis.

Sep 03, 2016 | 2003 Chrysler Sebring

1 Answer

My trunk will not open. When I take off battery cable and replace, it opens once. Is there an easy fix? relay etc?


When the rear compartment lid release switch is pushed, the rear compartment lid release signal circuit to the body control module (BCM) is grounded. BCM then grounds the coil side of the trunk release relay through the trunk release relay control circuit. With this voltage is applied to the rear compartment lid release actuator, opening the rear compartment.
Rear Compartment Lid Release Relay
  1. Ignition OFF, disconnect the trunk relay.
  2. Test for 65-90 ohms of resistance between terminals 85 and 86.
  3. ?‡'
    If the resistance is not within the specified range, replace the trunk relay.

  4. Test for infinite resistance between the following terminals:
  5. ?€¢
    30 and 86


    ?€¢
    30 and 87


    ?€¢
    30 and 85


    ?€¢
    85 and 87


    ?‡'
    If less than infinite resistance, replace the relay.

  6. Install a 10-amp fused jumper wire between relay terminal 85 and 12 volts. Install a jumper wire between relay terminal 86 and ground. Measure for less than 2 ohms of resistance between terminals 30 and 87.
?‡'
If greater than 2 ohms, replace the relay.


Rear Compartment Lid Release Relay Malfunction

  1. Ignition OFF, disconnect the trunk relay.
  2. Verify that a test lamp illuminates between the coil side B+ circuit of the trunk relay and ground.
  3. ?‡'
    If the test lamp does not illuminate, test the B+ circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal and the B+ circuit fuse is open, test the voltage control circuit for a short to ground. If the circuit tests normal, test or replace the trunk relay.

  4. Verify that a test lamp illuminates between the switch side B+ circuit of the trunk relay and ground.
  5. ?‡'
    If the test lamp does not illuminate, test the B+ circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance.

  6. Disconnect the harness connector at the rear compartment lid latch.
  7. Ignition OFF, test for less than 5 ohm of resistance between the rear compartment lid latch ground circuit and ground.
  8. ?‡'
    If greater than the specifed range, test the ground circuit for an open/high resistance.

  9. Connect a test lamp between the trunk release relay control circuit and the coil side B+ circuit of the trunk relay.
  10. Command the trunk release solenoid ON and OFF with a scan tool.
  11. ?‡'
    If the test lamp remains ON all the time, test the control circuit for a short to ground. If the circuit tests normal, replace the BCM.


    ?‡'
    If the test lamp remains OFF all the time, test the control circuit for a short to voltage or an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, replace the BCM.

  12. Connect the harness connector at the rear compartment lid latch.
  13. Connect a 3-amp fused jumper wire between the switch side B+ circuit of the trunk relay and the voltage control circuit of the lid latch. Verify that the lid latch activates.
  14. ?‡'
    If the lid latch does not activate, test the control circuit for an open/high resistance. If the circuit tests normal, test or replace the rear compartment lid latch.

  15. If all circuits test normal, test or replace the trunk relay.
Component Testing
Rear Compartment Lid Release Switch
  1. Ignition OFF, disconnect the harness connector at the rear compartment lid release switch.
  2. Test for infinite resistance between the trunk release switch supply voltage and ground terminals with the switch in the open position.
  3. ?‡'
    If less than infinite resistance, replace the rear compartment lid release switch.

  4. Test for less than 2 ohms of resistance between the trunk release switch supply voltage and ground terminals with the switch in the closed position.
  5. ?‡'
    If greater than 2 ohms, replace the rear compartment lid release switch.

  6. Test for infinite resistance between each terminal and the lid release switch housing/case.
?‡'
If less than infinite resistance, replace the rear compartment lid release switch.


Could be the relay , could be the switch , could be a problem with the BCM !

Apr 17, 2016 | 2007 Pontiac G6 GT Convertible

1 Answer

How do I wire up my driving lights on a 2011 kia sorento so they go out when the highbeams com on


use a relay with a normally closed contacts in series with the driving light. power the relay coil (in parallel) with the high beam. (use a relay for each left & right, if left driving light has a separate circuit from the right, to prevent circuit overload. (most relays with 5 terminals has both normally open & normally closed contacts)

Sep 23, 2015 | Kia Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Windshield wiper relay


no the relay will be located in a box mark relay or fuse open box look at top a daghme will show witch relay is the wiper

Sep 02, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Rear wiper comes on all the time


Remove the rear wiper relay. The relay works just like a fuel pump relay or any other relay.
Here is example of your relay system and how to test it: Remove the relay and turn the ignition switch on and the rear wiper should not operate. If the motor works with the relay out then seek out a priest as the motor is haunted. To test the circuit do the following:
Bypass the relay with a piece of wire, (preferably fused). This means: Remove the relay and put the piece of wire in place of terminal 30 and 87 in the cavity where the relay lives. Even if you don't use a fuse all you are doing is giving the wiper motor the same voltage it would be getting if the relay was closed. All electrical diagnoses should come from the relay. It gives you the input and output for the accessory. The input is 12v hot on terminal 30. This usually this is constant hot wire from the main buss line on the fuse box. The 87 terminal goes to the fan itself so that the output of this terminal will be a grounded motor waiting for voltage. The 86 wire on this relay is normally fed through the fuse box via the appropriate fuse and gets voltage when the ignition is turned on. The 85 terminal on the relay is the field ground and energizes the relay. This wire comes from the switch. When the rear wiper switch is turned on it sends ground the relay terminal 85 which closes the points of the relay and allow power to travel from the 30 terminal to the 87 terminal. This gives power from the 30 terminal to the appliance at the other end of the 87 terminal. The grounded rear window motor receives this power, begins to spin and operate the wiper. By the way relays have a failure rate of about .015% so the problem probably isn't the relay itself.Joe
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May 28, 2014 | 2006 GMC Yukon SLE

2 Answers

Engine fan does not come on after replacing relay switch


Bypass the relay with a piece of wire, (preferably fused). This means: Remove the relay and put the piece of wire in place of terminal 30 and 87 in the cavity where the relay lives. Even if you don't use a fuse all you are doing is giving the fan the same voltage it would be getting if the relay was closed. If the fan doesn't come on then leave the jumper wire in place and smack the fan motor with something like a screwdriver handle or small hammer with the voltage applied and see if that makes the fan come on. (Stuck fan- replace fan). All electrical diagnoses should come from the relay. It gives you the input and output for the fan. The input is 12v hot on terminal 30. This usually this is constant hot wire from the main buss line on the fuse box. The 87 terminal goes to the fan itself so that the output of this terminal will be a grounded motor waiting for voltage. The 86 wire on this relay is normally fed through the fuse box via the fuel pump fuse and gets voltage when the ignition is turned on. The 85 terminal on the relay is the field ground and energizes the relay. This wire comes from the switch which in this case is the computer or ECM. When the engine gets hot the coolant temperature swich sends a signal to the ECM to ground the relay terminal 85 which colses the points of the relay and allow power to travel from the 30 terminal to the 87 terminal. this gives power from the 30 terminal to the fan at the other end of the 87 terminal. the grounded fan receives this power, begins to spin and cool the engine. By the way relays have a failure rate of about .015% so the problem probably isn't the relay itself. Joe
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May 28, 2014 | Mazda 323 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Radiator fans do not come on . no powedr to the fan control relay


it has a switch(two wires coming out) or sender(on wire coming out) near the thermostat housing when the coolant reaches a certain temperature the sender grounds itself and this turns on the relays for the fan. How to check with a continuity tester when the engine is cold disconnect the connector right at the sender then put a test lead on a ground near the sender and the other lead at the end of the sender it should read OL(overload) or open when the engine is hot the reading should be zero (circuit is closed) or viceversa depending on the type of relay because some relays are normally open and some are normally closed. With the switch do same measurement except that you don't connect one end of the test lead to the ground remember the switch has two wire one lead in wire and the other test lead in the other should read open(or no measurement) when cold and zero when hot meaning circuit is closed

Jul 24, 2009 | 1997 Chrysler Town & Country

1 Answer

I have a solid red circle above my check engine light. Car won't turn over....maybe control module problem?


If the relay is energizing when you supply battery power to it, does it get battery power when the car gets hot (ecm controlling it) .Most relays work with 4 pins. 30 will be power to run the fan 87 is power out (normally open pin with 87a being normally closed part) 85 and 86 are the relay coil pins (that energize it) and you should have power and ground to those pins (only when car is hot enough to turn on fan). You can also check by jumping pin 30 to 87 where the relay plugs in and see if the fan comes on.

Mar 26, 2009 | 2002 Dodge Neon

1 Answer

1997 mercury marquis ac & blower


you could have. Take a look and find out. If the lid/cover of the fusebox does not name the fuses and relay's check owners manual, find the fuse(s) and/or relay and check it out.

Relay can be tested in a few ways,

first, easiest way get a buddy to go in the vehicle and switch your AC on and off, find the relay and get in real close and listen and feel for the relay clicking as he turns it on and off, if the relay is clicking it is most likely working fine.

if you are unsure on relay working you can try this method: theres usually 2 switches one is normally closed one normally open. Using a multimeter and the electrical diagram that should be on the side of the relay itself you should be able to figure out which switch is normally open and which is normally closed. Look carefully sometimes the writing, labels and numbers are hard to see.


Another possible cause is that your temp sensor failed so the computer thinks its -40 degrees and therefor won't run the fan. check the temperature sensor wiring, and the sensor itself after you look at fuses and relay operation.

Hope this helps :)

Sep 04, 2008 | 1999 Mercury Grand Marquis

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