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I took out the cylinder head for reconditioning after the car overheated ,then resetting valve timing is my problem now?

Setting the cam belt at number 1 cylinder at top dead center with valves rocking number 5 cylinder

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Is number 1 on tdcc or tdci? It should be tdcc with both number one cylinder valves closed as they would be on number one tdcc. I have no idea why you would be rocking number 5 cylinder valves with number one on tdcc or otherwise. The valve and ignition timing needs to be set correct on number one tdcc and then all others will fall into their correct timing also.

Posted on Dec 11, 2014

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I. Need. Help. With. Cam bolts. And head bolts


Part 1 of 3: Getting to the head bolts

Materials Needed
  • Eye protection
  • Gloves
  • Oil and coolant drain
  • Parts cleaner or brake cleaner
  • Shop rags
  • Socket set and ratchet1: Drain the oil and coolant. Put on your eye protection and gloves and drain the oilfrom the vehicle.
    Make sure the vehicle can not be started by removing the negative cable from the battery. Next the coolant will need to be drained so it does not leak when the head bolts are loosened.
    Step 2: Clean valve cover. Use some of the parts cleaner or brake cleaner to clean up the valve cover and as much of the cylinder head as is reasonable.Remove valve cover. If necessary, remove other components to make the valve covers accessible, and start removing the bolts from the valve cover.
    Once all bolts are removed carefully removed the valve cover from the cylinder head. If any valve cover gasket material remains, remove it at this time and clean any excess oil from the edges. Set the valve cover aside carefully as it will be reused with a new gasket once repairs are completed.

    Part 2 of 3: Pushrod engine head bolt removal

    Materials Needed
    • Head bolt socket (if needed)
    • Numbered cardboard
    • Rubber hammer
    • Socket set and ratchetStep 1: Rocker arm and rocker removal. A pushrod engine has long pushrods that protrude through the cylinder head and attach to the rocker rail.
      The rocket arm will need to be loosened first. Many manufactures have a specific sequence for removal of the rocker arm bolts. After the rocker arm is removed, the rockers will be unbolted.
      Set all rocker arms aside in the order they were removed as they should go back to the cylinder they were removed from.Step 2: Remove the pushrods. Remove the pushrods one at a time from the cylinder head.
      Put them into a numbered piece of cardboard as the pushrods will go back into the same slot they came from.Step 3: Loosen head bolts. Use the ratchet begin to break the cylinder head bolts loose.
      Each bolt will be loosened but not removed. Loosen all of the bolts before removing any of the the bolts all the way.
      Step 4: Remove the bolts. Place each bolt through a numbered hole in the cardboard in case the head bolts are different lengths so they can be installed back into the proper hole.
      The bolts may require a special socket depending on the manufacture.
      Step 5: Lift off the cylinder head. Once all bolts are removed, lift up on the cylinder headgently; the head should come free easilyIf the cylinder head sticks, lightly use a dead blow or rubber mallet to tap the cylinder head to be able to remove it. Set to the side in a safe area.
      • Warning: Cylinder head bolts have a specific sequence that is used when removing them. Consult the manufacturer's specifications for the proper removal sequence for the engine being worked on.

      Part 3 of 3: Overhead cam head bolt removal

      Material Needed
      • Socket set and ratchetStep 1: Remove the timing cover. The timing cover will need to be removed to gain access to the timing belt or chain.
        This is necessary because the cam shaft sits in the cylinder head and is attached to the crankshaft with either a timing belt or timing chain.
        Step 2: Time the engine to remove the belt. The engine will need to be timed to avoid damage when the timing belt is removed.
        Each engine is different and will have its own procedures to time. There should be marks on the camshaft and crankshaft that will be aligned to set the timing at top dead center (TDC)Step 3: Remove the timing belt. The timing belt tensioner will be removed or released to take the tension off the belt.
        Once the belt is loosened, it should be able to be slipped of the camshaft in the cylinder head.Step 4: Remove the head bolts. Every engine will have its own procedures for the order that the head bolts are removed or tightened.
        Loosen head bolts ¼ turn each in the order specified, which may require a special socket. Once all the bolts have been loosened they may be removed one at a time. The bolts must be organized or marked in case they are different lengths.
        Step 5: Remove the cylinder head. Once all the bolts are removed, the cylinder head may be removed from the engine. If it is stuck, tap lightly on the side of the head with a rubber hammer to loosen the cylinder head.
        • Warning: Most head bolts are torque-to-yield. These head bolts are single use only and once removed must be replaced. Torque-to-yield head bolts stretch when they are torqued to allow them to tighten properly and repeated application can cause the head bolt to break.
        Removing the head bolts can seem like a daunting process

Sep 29, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How to set camshaft timing


you should have bought a Chilton or Haynes manual. most cars and trucks are all different and have a set way to set them. if you broke the chain or belt and bent a valve. you will need to do expensive repairs pulling the heads to change valves. not sure what car you have or why you pulled the timing off. so I cant be sure what to tell you.

Mar 12, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2004 Dodge NEON with an interference engine that the timing belt broke on. What are the chances of valve damage and about how much does that cost to fix?


The valves will be bent and you will need a head job done. The time to do the job outside head reconditioning would be around 4 hours labour and the parts will include valves, head gasket kit, timing belt, adjuster pulley, and if the job is done properly crankshaft and cam shaft seals as oil is the main cause of belt failure.

Apr 27, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I replace timing belt but cant set timing


Hi Robert, It would help to know what engine is in your vehicle? A rule of thumb way to set up the valve timing is as follows. Rotate the crank shaft until the crank shaft mark is about 90 degrees from TDC. This will protect the valves from damage when rotating the cams to align them. With the tappet cover removed rotate the cam shaft or shafts so that the number one cylinder is on compression (both inlet and exhaust valves fully closed) and the last cylinder in line on overlap, Look for adjacent timing marks on the cam gears and somewhere close to those look for the alignment marks (maybe notch marks, holes or indented match marks). (Some manufactures use the machined gasket surface where the tappet cover closes onto the cylinder head). Look closely for the static mark on the cylinder head and align the cam(s) to it or them. Once completed, set the crank at Top Dead Center and look carefully for a timing mark which aligns with the gear and set them. Fit the belt so the marks align when the tensioner bearing is released and presses the belt under load. (follow the manufactures recommended tightening instructions.) . (Remember never to crimp a timing belt, if it has been, throw it away and get another, even if it is new!) If the belt snapped and that is the reason for replacement, internal damage may have resulted inside the engine. A snapped belt may cause damage to the valves, the camshafts, the cam shaft caps and to the pistons. If the engine turns much faster than expected and sounds as if there is no compression, you have problems! (Those I've just mentioned. I hope not for your sake. best of luck Regards John

Dec 12, 2011 | 2000 Hyundai Accent

1 Answer

Broken timing belt


Hi Nunley, I'm not sure if this engine design protects the valves or not in the event of the timing belt breaking. If it does all you need do is replace a new belt and you're off, but I think that if it breaks it means big problems. The problems will come in the form of bent and damaged valves and possibly also damaged pistons. The best way to find out for sure is to fit a new belt, with the crankshaft on the TDC mark and with the cam shaft aligned to the notch marks at the rear of the cylinder head (if memory serves well) I believe that an insert is needed that fits into the slots and aligns with the top surface of the cylinder head. Fit it and then give it the correct tension, rotate the engine by hand with the correct size spanner (wrench) and recheck the alignment of the marks with each second revolution of the engine. if they match up, before doing any more assembly, carry out a compression test. If the compression shows a failure of pressure build up, suspect bent and damaged valves and that will mean a cylinder head reconditioning job. Don't shoot the messenger. Best of luck John

Nov 29, 2011 | 1994 Ford Escort

1 Answer

How do i set the valve timing if i cant see the timing marks on a VW 1.8 20valve golf cylinder head timing chain , i can only find the one on the belt side i have put the cam on TDC for the ex-valve but...


The 2 cams are linked with a chain at the rear of the cylinder head.

The cams need to be set so the slots on the chain sprockets line up with the cam tower caps with 16 links between cam caps.

You cannot see the front crank pulley tdc mark so you need to lock the engine at tdc with a screwdriver jammed into the timing hole on the bell housing after setting engine at tdc or use a DTI
to check to tdc in the #1 spark plug hole.

If the cams have not been disturbed you only need to set the belt cam sprocket to the mark and crank to tdc.....all this means pulling the core support into the service position so the belt tensioner can be locked down and/or doing a complete belt job along with a coolant pump if over 70,000 miles..

Aug 20, 2011 | Volkswagen Golf Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have 2001 Hyundai sonata and time belt and valve are broken


Must have Cylinder Head reconditioned at a shop $275-400, and replace broken belt and bearings with a new timing component kit $100. Labor varies by location as a guess.. $400 for a single head and $600 for V-6. Gasket set $100. If its a V-6 both heads need to come off and be serviced.

all in all about $1100 for a 4 cylinder and $1300 for a V-6.
Not a do it yourself project. Call around different shops for prices and warranty on work.

Good Luck!

Jul 21, 2011 | Hyundai Tucson Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1994 s10 truck has spark and fuel but will not start This all happened suddenly no warning signs


Hi, An engine that has fuel and spark, no serious vacuum leaks and cranks normally should start. The problem is compression 57f07a7.jpg If it is an overhead cam engine with a rubber timing belt, a broken timing belt a35cd82.jpg would be the most likely cause especially if the engine has a lot of miles on it. Most OEMs recommend replacing the OHC timing belt every 60,000 miles for preventative maintenance, but many belts are never changed. Eventually they break, and when they do the engine stops dead in its tracks. And in engines that lack sufficient valve-to-piston clearance as many import engines and some domestic engines do, it also causes extensive damage (bent valves and valvetrain components & sometimes cracked pistons). Overhead cams can also bind and break if the head warps due to severe overheating, or the cam bearings are starved for lubrication. A cam seizure may occur during a subzero cold start if the oil in the crankcase is too thick and is slow to reach the cam (a good reason for using 5W-20 or 5W-30 for winter driving). High rpm cam failure can occur if the oil level is low or the oil is long overdue for a change. With high mileage pushrod engines, the timing chain may have broken or slipped. Either type of problem can be diagnosed by doing a compression check and/or removing a valve cover and watching for valve movement when the engine is cranked. A blown head gasket 1e00f0b.gifmay prevent an engine from starting if the engine is a four cylinder with two dead cylinders. But most six or eight cylinder engines will sputter to life and run roughly even with a blown gasket. The gasket can, however, allow coolant to leak into the cylinder and hydrolock the engine.
Take care

Jul 09, 2010 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

One cylinder has zero compression. took head off replaced bent valves in cylinder 3 from timing belt breaking. Had head professionally rebuilt. cylinders 1, 2 & 3 have 120# compression. checked...


OK!... did you do a cylinder 'leak down test'?.. .if not, do it! If any 'unacceptable' leakage, have the head REDONE! NOW!.. you must BE SURE the valve timing is accurate!... Go to www.hmaservice.com and register( Vehicle by VIN). Afterward, you have access to shop manuals, service bulletins, wiring diagrams, etc. about your vehicle.

Sep 24, 2009 | 2001 Hyundai Accent

1 Answer

Broke timing belt and bent valves . i have reconditioned the head and replaced timing belt but have no oil presure . how do i get to the oil pump to check


When you put on the head there are two oil pressure plugs under the cams with reverse torque heads. Did you put them in the new head?

Mar 14, 2009 | 1999 Daewoo Nubira

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