Question about 2002 GMC Sierra

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Help with 2002 GMC Sierra Denali, we drove the vehicle parked it and then it would crank but die again fuel pressure is 60 psi, changed spark plugs, fuel filter and noticed the security light is on.

Help with 2002 GMC Sierra Denali, we drove the vehicle parked it and then it would crank but die again fuel pressure is 60 psi, changed spark plugs, fuel filter and noticed the security light is on. Remote will not open doors. What is wrong with it

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  • GMC Master
  • 2,182 Answers

The security, antitheft or lock picture/icon is a visual indication that something in the car's antitheft system is failing. In most GM cars and trucks there is a hidden system that most people are unaware even exists. From the moment you put your key in the ignition, there begins a constant line of communication between your key's security chip or transponder, to the ignition's lock cylinder, and then to the car's TDM (Theft Deterrent Module). These 3 parts are in CONSTANT communication. If the key is in the ignition, then these parts are sending signals to each other. The security light illuminates when that signal gets broken, even just for a second. When the signal breaks, the car misinterprets this as an attempt at theft and goes into antitheft mode. The car thinks its being stolen or hotwired because it is not getting that signal from YOUR specific key. This is why the security light turns on and shuts down your vehicle. This link explains it pretty well.
http://www.diy-gm-security.com/
http://newrockies.com/

Posted on Jan 05, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 1999 Yukon cold start problems.

1999 Yukon Start Issue - I have replaced the octopuse, battery, fuel filter, fuel pump, still having problems starting in cold weather, sometimes after a heavy rain.

Any suggestions?

Thanks

Posted on Dec 08, 2008

GM Elec
  • 1000 Answers

SOURCE: 99 GMC Sierra Pickup: Crank but no start. starts

The theft light issue is a good observation. Have you replaced the key tumbler or an ignition component lately? Has there been a lightning storm close very recently?

What the flashing security light is indicating is an attempt to relearn the key you are using.
Turn the key to run position, allow light to flash for 10 minutes, when light stops flashing turn ignition to OFF position for 5 seconds, turn ignition to run position and start over. Do this for 3 consecutive cycles, the the theft system will relearn the key cylinder code and store it once again.
Try that first before you go any further.
Let me know what you find.
Regards,

Posted on Apr 30, 2009

inhisname
  • 76 Answers

SOURCE: !996 Chevy pick-up 4.3L CPI Fuel problem

hello, sorry for the bad luck u r having with the 4.3l cpi.........unfortunatly it is common for the "spider legs" to break or crack causing a large fuel leak inside lower plenum... the fuel injection spider is not too expensive or difficult to change, but there is some time involved.. i hope this helps, marty

Posted on May 29, 2009

  • 148 Answers

SOURCE: 96 gmc sierra hard to crank after 12-14 hours

that has a votec engine in it the fuel pressure is droping at knight and it takes 60 psi before the injectors will fire most likely cause fuel pump ,leaking injector ,or a feul pressure regulator

Posted on Jul 14, 2009

ZJLimited
  • 17970 Answers

SOURCE: I have 1997 Toyota T100

If an engine cranks but refuses to start, it lacks ignition, fuel or compression. Was it running fine but quit suddenly? The most likely causes here would be a failed fuel pump, ignition module or broken overhead cam timing belt. Has the engine been getting progressively harder to start? If yes, consider the engine's maintenance and repair history.

A good starter will normally draw 60 to 150 amps with no load on it, and up to 200 amps or more while cranking the engine. The no load amp draw depends on the rating of the starter while the cranking amp draw depends on the displacement and compression of the engine. Always refer to the OEM specs for the exact amp values. Some "high torque" GM starters, for example, may have a no load draw of up to 250 amps. Toyota starters on four-cylinder engines typically draw 130 to 150 amps, and up to 175 amps on six-cylinder engines.

ENGINE CRANKS BUT WILL NOT START
When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and compression. Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or crankshaft position (CKP) sensor.

A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit.

Module problems as well as pickup problems are often caused by loose, broken or corroded wiring terminals and connectors. Older GM HEI ignition modules are notorious for this. If you are working on a distributorless ignition system with a Hall effect crankshaft position sensor, check the sensor's reference voltage (VRef) and ground. The sensor must have 5 volts or it will remain permanently off and not generate a crank signal (which should set a fault code). Measure VRef between the sensor power supply wire and ground (use the engine block for a ground, not the sensor ground circuit wire). Don't see 5 volts? Then check the sensor wiring harness for loose or corroded connectors. A poor ground connection will have the same effect on the sensor operation as a bad VRef supply. Measure the voltage drop between the sensor ground wire and the engine block. More than a 0.1 voltage drop indicates a bad ground connection. Check the sensor mounting and wiring harness.

If a Hall effect crank sensor has power and ground, the next thing to check would be its output. With nothing in the sensor window, the sensor should be "on" and read 5 volts (VRef). Measure the sensor D.C. output voltage between the sensor signal output wire and ground (use the engine block again, not the ground wire). When the engine is cranked, the sensor output should drop to zero every time the shutter blade, notch, magnetic button or gear tooth passes through the sensor. No change in voltage would indicate a bad sensor that needs to be replaced.

If the primary side of the ignition system seems to be producing a trigger signal for the coil but the voltage is not reaching the plugs, a visual inspection of the coil tower, distributor cap, rotor and plug wires should be made to identify any defects that might be preventing the spark from reaching its intended destination.

ENGINE CRANKS AND HAS SPARK BUT WILL NOT START
If you see a good hot spark when you crank the engine, but it won't start, check for fuel. The problem might be a bad fuel pump.

On an older engine with a carburetor, pump the throttle linkage and look for fuel squirting into the carburetor throat. No fuel? Possible causes include a bad mechanical fuel pump, stuck needle valve in the carburetor, a plugged fuel line or fuel filter.

On newer vehicles with electronic fuel injection, connect a pressure gauge to the fuel rail to see if there is any pressure in the line. No pressure when the key is on? Check for a failed fuel pump, pump relay, fuse or wiring problem. On Fords, don't forget to check the inertia safety switch which is usually hidden in the trunk or under a rear kick panel. The switch shuts off the fuel pump in an accident. So if the switch has been tripped, resetting it should restore the flow of fuel to the engine. Lack of fuel can also be caused by obstructions in the fuel line or pickup sock inside the tank. And don't forget to check the fuel gauge. It is amazing how many no starts are caused by an empty fuel tank.

There is also the possibility that the fuel in the tank may be heavily contaminated with water or overloaded with alcohol. If the tank was just filled, bad gas might be causing the problem.

On EFI-equipped engines, fuel pressure in the line does not necessarily mean the fuel is being injected into the engine. Listen for clicking or buzzing that would indicate the injectors are working. No noise? Check for voltage and ground at the injectors. A defective ECM may not be driving the injectors, or the EFI power supply relay may have called it quits. Some EFI-systems rely on input from the camshaft position sensor to generate the injector pulses. Loss of this signal could prevent the system from functioning.

Even if there is fuel and it is being delivered to the engine, a massive vacuum leak could be preventing the engine from starting. A large enough vacuum leak will lean out the air/fuel ratio to such an extent that the mixture won't ignite. An EGR valve that is stuck wide open, a disconnected PCV hose, loose vacuum hose for the power brake booster, or similar leak could be the culprit. Check all vacuum connections and listen for unusual sucking noises while cranking.

ENGINE HAS FUEL AND SPARK BUT WILL NOT START
An engine that has fuel and spark, no serious vacuum leaks and cranks normally should start. The problem is compression . If it is an overhead cam engine with a rubber timing belt, a broken timing belt would be the most likely cause especially if the engine has a lot of miles on it. Most OEMs recommend replacing the OHC timing belt every 60,000 miles for preventative maintenance, but many belts are never changed. Eventually they break, and when they do the engine stops dead in its tracks. And in engines that lack sufficient valve-to-piston clearance as many import engines and some domestic engines do, it also causes extensive damage (bent valves and valvetrain components & sometimes cracked pistons).

Overhead cams can also bind and break if the head warps due to severe overheating, or the cam bearings are starved for lubrication. A cam seizure may occur during a subzero cold start if the oil in the crankcase is too thick and is slow to reach the cam (a good reason for using 5W-20 or 5W-30 for winter driving). High rpm cam failure can occur if the oil level is low or the oil is long overdue for a change.

With high mileage pushrod engines, the timing chain may have broken or slipped. Either type of problem can be diagnosed by doing a compression check and/or removing a valve cover and watching for valve movement when the engine is cranked.

A blown head gasket may prevent an engine from starting if the engine is a four cylinder with two dead cylinders. But most six or eight cylinder engines will sputter to life and run roughly even with a blown gasket. The gasket can, however, allow coolant to leak into the cylinder and hydrolock the engine.


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Posted on Sep 02, 2010

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1 Answer

My van just died 1 day after work. it's getting spark and fuel but wont start. i already replaced the crank sensor and it still wont start. please help me?!!!!!!!!!!


the first thing is check your fuel pressure for the right psi. some vehicles will not start if the pressure is off only by a couple psi. your particular van is epuipped with a injector module assembly under the upper intake manifold. commonly called a injector spider. those are notorious for leaking and will keep a vehicle from starting. also while your checking your spark how did you do it? if the spark was any color but blue it is too weak of a spark and the vehicle will not start with that. this could be worn plugs, wires or weak coil.

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Start with the simple and replace the fuel filter. The fuel filter may have reached the end of it's life time and is dirty causing the issues you have. The worst is the fuel pump it self has gone bad and needs to be replaced, the fuel pump should be producing 62 to 65 PSI when the engine is started and should drop no more then 5 PSI when the engine is running. You can check the fuel pressure at the shredder valve with a fuel pressure gauge. Good luck and keep me posted, be glad to help get your Yukon running 100% again.

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Can Fuel pressure cause no spark in a 1997 GMC Sierra? I replaced the fuel pump. drove 30kms and it died. I have no spark. Any ideas for this?


Do you still have fuel pump pressure?Is there fuel getting to the cylinders?If all the fuses are good,then replace the crankshaft sensor.

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96 gmc sierra hard to crank after 12-14 hours


that has a votec engine in it the fuel pressure is droping at knight and it takes 60 psi before the injectors will fire most likely cause fuel pump ,leaking injector ,or a feul pressure regulator

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U NEED TO CK THE FUEL PRESSURE 55 TO 62 PSI.IT CAN LOOK LIKE U HAVE FUEL.IT MAY NOT BE ENOUGH.IF U HAVE LOW PRESSURE CK THE FUEL FILTER BEFORE U CHANGE THE PUMP

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You need to find out if you have enough fuel pressure, and if you have injector pulse. A noid light is a simple kind of test light that you can get at a parts house to test injector pulse. Unplug an injector and plug the noid light into the harness. Have someone crank the engine, if it flashes then your injectors are firing. Check all the fuses under the hood. You should have 55 to 60 psi fuel pressure.

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Just having fuel is not enough on this engine, here are the spec's. Even 1 psi out of spec can cause a no start.

Fuel Pressure
Pressure 1 (PSI) Pressure 2 (PSI) Pressure 3 (PSI) Range Note Range Note Range Note 60.0 - 66.0 Y131 50.0 - 63.0 Y132 66.0 Y133 Y131: System pressure with ignition on (PSI).
Y132: System pressure while idling (PSI).
Y133: Fuel pump pressure (PSI) with return line briefly restricted.



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Hello, 9-10 volts is not enough to keep a modern vehicle running. Taking in consideration the age and model of this truck, it could easily be an alternator failure.
I hope this helps.
CYA Gator241

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