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Is it easy to press bushings out of trailing arms,control arms all rubber with the steel guid pin,do I and what can I use for lubricant or no,,do I need to be careful how much presher or just go for i

I never have pressed bushing before and have watched tube people doing it on $150 10 ton press for auto shop not bad for the price,any tips trick would be very helpful as I am not a mechanic and input from one would be great thank u and have a great day

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I seen those video too and bought a 12 ton press from Harbor Freight delivered to my door for $110 with 20% off discount.
You need the press to get the old ones out. The new one go in easily but still needed pressing.
If you are doing A-arms, make sure you measure the distance between the arms from the inside. Cut a couple of pieces of wooden dowels to jam between them before any pressing. If not you will close the spread and they won't reintall properly. It's a pain to spread them if they close up due to pressing the new bushing in. Yea, did one to learn not to do.
No lube needed. Find a YouTube video that has the same/similar type as yours and follow what they did.

Posted on Nov 27, 2014

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  • Cars & Trucks Expert
  • 315 Answers

Yes it's not that hard to do, make sure everything is square and push the outer part of the bush, you shouldn't need any more then 5t of pressure, again be careful and wear safety glasses just in case, and again make sure all is flat and square on the press, hope this helps

Posted on Nov 27, 2014

  • Ron Kentwell
    Ron Kentwell Nov 27, 2014

    thanks for the tips,as i would not have worn eye protecion. as i do when useing power tools.as to the press under that much force makes total sense thanks

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tripletauto
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SOURCE: Malibu 2002 - Control Arm bushing replacement

these arent available have to replace control arm assembly. unless u can get aftermarket

Posted on Sep 22, 2008

  • 30 Answers

SOURCE: 2000 Grand Cherokee Upper Ball Joint

Illustration of control arm:
http://www.penguinscouts.com/pics/jeep/Differential%20Suspension.jpg

The wishbone part, number 12, is the control arm. In the two ends, left side of picture, are the two bushings. These are pressed in bushings.

The rubber bushings, with their bonded steel shells, are separate parts, the part number for the (2) bushings are: 52088425

These bushings normally won't be damaged, but, in my case, due to extensive towing of a heavy trailer, these bushings had tears in the rubber bonding between the shell and the central spindle. These tears caused by the trailer snatching the frame around (trailer hitch is frame mounted) while the differential is essentially connected to the earth, through the tire rubber, and to the frame, through the ball joint and arm rubber bushings.

You can easily view the condition of the rubber simply by rolling under the vehicle with a flashlight, and looking. The bolts are vertical, right up through the bushing spindle, into the frame.

The bolts through the bushing spindle mount the arm to the frame.

The ball joint, at the apex of the arm, is number 8, and is Jeep part number 52088808AB.

This ball joint is an assembly which also includes the mounting flange plate. This plate bolts atop the differential housing with three bolts. The ball joint pin protrudes through the hole in the apex of the arms, and is secured by a nut, item 11, Jeep part number 06502698

Again, don't replace the bushings unless you see visible tears in the rubber web, or rotted, aged, cracked out webbing.

One more thing to note if you take down the arm... the emergency brake cables and brake lines are secured to the arm with small metal clips and bolts. Minor point here is when you reattach these bolts, don't crank down on them more than about 12 ft lbs torque, as these bolts go into the sheet metal wall of the arm, and there's no need to try to strip out these threads... Just secure them a bit, not to tank down on them.

Posted on Oct 06, 2008

moparownr
  • 667 Answers

SOURCE: need to replace upper & lower control arm bushings

yes

Posted on Apr 02, 2009

cadman000
  • 607 Answers

SOURCE: control arm bushings

Special tools are required. Definitely not for the novice. An alignment will be needed after the required work is performed

Posted on Apr 03, 2009

alicantecoli
  • 22095 Answers

SOURCE: Are the upper control arm bushing pressed in or

pressed in but can be removed by cutting with a hacksaw in reverse so to speak ,remove blade and push through bush to cut out the metal casing then pull new ones through with a long bolt and socket

Posted on Apr 11, 2009

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3 Answers

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1 Answer

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Illustration of control arm:
http://www.penguinscouts.com/pics/jeep/Differential%20Suspension.jpg

The wishbone part, number 12, is the control arm. In the two ends, left side of picture, are the two bushings. These are pressed in bushings.

The rubber bushings, with their bonded steel shells, are separate parts, the part number for the (2) bushings are: 52088425

These bushings normally won't be damaged, but, in my case, due to extensive towing of a heavy trailer, these bushings had tears in the rubber bonding between the shell and the central spindle. These tears caused by the trailer snatching the frame around (trailer hitch is frame mounted) while the differential is essentially connected to the earth, through the tire rubber, and to the frame, through the ball joint and arm rubber bushings.

You can easily view the condition of the rubber simply by rolling under the vehicle with a flashlight, and looking. The bolts are vertical, right up through the bushing spindle, into the frame.

The bolts through the bushing spindle mount the arm to the frame.

The ball joint, at the apex of the arm, is number 8, and is Jeep part number 52088808AB.

This ball joint is an assembly which also includes the mounting flange plate. This plate bolts atop the differential housing with three bolts. The ball joint pin protrudes through the hole in the apex of the arms, and is secured by a nut, item 11, Jeep part number 06502698

Again, don't replace the bushings unless you see visible tears in the rubber web, or rotted, aged, cracked out webbing.

One more thing to note if you take down the arm... the emergency brake cables and brake lines are secured to the arm with small metal clips and bolts. Minor point here is when you reattach these bolts, don't crank down on them more than about 12 ft lbs torque, as these bolts go into the sheet metal wall of the arm, and there's no need to try to strip out these threads... Just secure them a bit, not to tank down on them.

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