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Is a symptom of a burned out starter motor a very heavy electrical draw, without the starter engaging? The solenoid does click.

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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Starter motors normally draw around 450 to 650 amps when starting an engine. The solenoid clicking indicates that there is not sufficient current to spin the armature. The first check is to have a load test done on the battery.( batteries are prone to sudden failure if they are weak to start with and the temperature falls really low. next is to check battery terminals and posts are shiny clean and tight . Lastly if you feel that it is still the starter motor have it removed and bench tested as the major failures are dry joints in the armature bars or worn bushes that allow the armature to hit the poles .The brushes may also be worn below a working levels

Posted on Nov 26, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

aaangie220
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SOURCE: 1997 Neon Starter Solenoid Engages,,BUT

ase mechanic here, sounds like the starter is on its way out, will have to replace since you cleaned all the connections, but in the mean time try hitting the solenoid portion with some object and see if the engine starts. if so the starter needs replacing.

Posted on Jan 26, 2009

SOURCE: Where can I get a wiring diagram for my 95 Geo

If you get a Haynes repair manual it will have all of the wiring diagrams for the car.

Posted on May 31, 2009

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SOURCE: THE STARTER WILL NOT ENGAGE ON MY 2001 MAZDA MELLENIA?

it is located on starter so you have to replace starter

Posted on Jan 10, 2010

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SOURCE: 98 Jeep Grand Cherokee - will not start - starter

I also have a 98 Jeep Cherokee with the same problem. I know I probably need to replace the starter eventually but as of now I turn it to accessory only, pop it in neutral, then start it and it works every time when it wouldn't even try to turn over with it in park. Don't know why it works, but it does. Give it a try.

Posted on Jul 22, 2009

landsend
  • 1066 Answers

SOURCE: 1995 subaru legacy with new starter and

A solenoid needs so much power to kick in.  I think your battery is getting old and not at full capacity.  Hove it check and replace if needed.

Posted on Mar 29, 2009

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3 Answers

Why does my starter engage for only a second, then spin freely after that. it was removed and tested at Autozone and passed. The starter stayed engaged during the test when no load was encountered.


Hi Anonymous

What I believe you've said is that you turn the key to start, the engine turns over for a second, then you just hear the starter spinning but no engine turn over. Yes?

Then you took it to Autozone and tested it and it stayed engaged during the test. The differences, possible or real here, are the load on the starter gear end, and the electricity driving it.

There are a couple things happening in the start cycle. The motor starts spinning and the solenoid pushes the spinning gear forward to engage the toothed edge of the flywheel. If the solenoid doesn't push enough, the gear won't engage. So, one thought is that there's an issue with the solenoid - it may push the gear out just fine, but lack power to keep it pressed forward if there is back-force from the engine.

If you have a poor connection to the battery, the solenoid may not draw the current to keep the gear engaged. Checking the hot (red) wire both at the battery and where it attaches to the starter is the primary diagnostic there. Even if the battery has a good charge, the current draw if starting is the heaviest load it encounters in a typical day of driving, so the ability of the battery to dump that charge quickly in a pulse of high current is also important, and non-corroded, tightly connected wires help.

The starter gear also has a clutch in it - akin to the freewheel on the rear of a bike, or a ratchet. This lets the gear spin faster than the starter motor once the engine catches, so that the engine doesn't essentially grab the engaged starter motor and spin it waaay too fast. letting back on the key lets the fast spinning gear disengage without trouble. If there is an issue with that clutch/ratchet, that might also be allowing the gear to spin without it actually pushing - like the clicker in a ratchet sticking so that it'll spin either way.

After that.... there is likely both a relay and a fuse for the starter. Not a bad idea to check that neither is blown, or, in the case of the relay, looking sort of browned and cooked.

Hope this helps!
D

Dec 05, 2015 | 2000 Oldsmobile Alero

Tip

Rapid clicking noise when trying to start the engine?


Hi There,

You turn the key to start your engine and....
a series of rapid clicks. Your car won't start. What's going on?

That clicking noise is your starter solenoid.

Your starter needs a lot of power to turn your engine. That much power would melt your ignition switch in no time if it passed directly through it. So what happens instead is your ignition switch actuates another electric switch called a solenoid. The solenoid is a really HEAVY DUTY switch.

Inside it are two copper contacts that look like the head of a bolt only rounded. The battery is attached to one, the starter to the other. Hovering above them on a spring is a copper clad disk attached to an iron core. The iron core is inside an electro-magnet.

When you turn your key (in a perfect world), an electromagnet is activated that yanks the disk towards the contacts (Making a single decisive healthy CLICK). When they connect, the circuit is closed and the starter turns over. OK.

When things go wrong:

Low Battery:
  • The solenoid requires power to actuate.
  • The starter takes a lot more power to turn the engine.
  • When the battery is low, there isn't enough power to do both.
  • You turn the key, solenoid engages (CLICK)
  • Power goes to the starter
  • The starter tries to turn the engine
  • The draw from the starter drops the available power below the minimum needed to keep the solenoid engaged.
  • The solenoid disengages
  • The starter is no longer drawing power
  • The additional power allows the solenoid to re-engage (Click)
  • Repeat the process for as long as you have the key turned. (CLICKCLICKCLICKCLICK)
That's where those clicks are coming from and why.

The remedy:
Short term - Jump start
Long term - Charge or replace battery.


I wanted to explain what was happening rather than just saying 'dead battery, replace it'. That way you can judge for yourself whats going on.

Best regards
Mike

on Apr 20, 2010 | Ford F-100 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine wont turn over on my gv 2006


The 1st thing i need to do is clarify what you mean by "won't trun over" do you mean the starter motor spins the engine and it will not fire up or that the starter doesn't trun the engine over? If the starter doesn't turn the engine over do you hear a clicking coming from the starter solenoid when this happens? If so replace the starter solenoid the heavy electrical contacts are burned.

Dec 28, 2011 | 2006 Suzuki Grand Vitara

2 Answers

Car clicks but wont start...power is good with interior/dash lights.....


this is caused by a defective starter solenoid, the heavy contact that engage the starter get burned the solenoid engages (the click u hear) but the starter gets no power due to the contacts being burned away

Oct 26, 2010 | 2001 GMC Yukon XL

2 Answers

2001 mustang gt,all access. work fully charged


I would suspect the starter solenoid has failed.

A starter solenoid (or starter relay) is the part of an automobile which relays a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. In many vehicles the solenoid also engages the starter pinion with the ring gear of the engine.

The starter solenoid receives a large electric current from the car battery and a small electric current from the ignition switch. When the ignition switch is turned on, a small electric current is sent to the starter solenoid. This causes the starter solenoid to close a pair of heavy contacts, thus relaying a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. The starter motor is an electric motor that initiates piston motion in a car's internal combustion engine before it can power itself.

Nov 27, 2009 | 2001 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

I have a starting problem problem with my 2006 dodge durango. this problem does not happen at all attempts to start but when it happens i get a clicking sound and have toget the truck boost started. i had...


It sounds like your starter solenoid (relay) is failing. The clicking is a classic symptom. It's time to have it replaced.

A starter solenoid (or starter relay) is the part of an automobile which relays a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion .In many vehicles the solenoid also engages the starter pinion with the ring gear of the engine.

The starter solenoid receives a large electric current from the car battery and a small electric current from the ignition switch. When the ignition switch is turned on, a small electric current is sent to the starter solenoid. This causes the starter solenoid to close a pair of heavy contacts, thus relaying a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. The starter motor is an electric motor that initiates piston motion in a car's internal combustion engine before it can power itself.

Oct 27, 2009 | 2005 Dodge Durango

3 Answers

1999 acura cl 3.0 will not start. It is clicking when I try to and with the clicking the lights and panel go on and off in unison with the clicking


Several things at play: Possible the battery, can you have the car jumped to see if it may start? If the same condition exist I expect the starter and its solenoid has failed. THe clicking your hearing I expect is the starter solenoid engaging; being the starter does not rotate it will pull heavy amps causing the lights to dim and such. I'd hold off on trying to start it until you confirm which. If the starter is bad and you continually try to start it the heavy amps draws from the starter can damage the battery. Also check your cable connections too. Be certain they are clean and tight; this is for the ground connection too. Please remember if you do need to remove the starter to remove the ground cable from the battery first; this is to protect you and your car's electrical system.
I hope this may have helped,
Tom

Oct 14, 2009 | 1999 Acura CL

1 Answer

2006 uplander has new battery and clamps no corrosion just clicks and no start


While your Chevy is still pretty new, it sounds like you have a starter solenoid issue. That's a typical symptom of its failure.

A starter solenoid (or starter relay) is the part of an automobile which relays a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion.In many vehicles the solenoid also engages the starter pinion with the ring gear of the engine.

Oct 13, 2009 | 2007 Chevrolet Uplander

1 Answer

Changed battery, starter, checked timing belt. Clicks but won't turn over.


this car uses a Nippon Denso starter, this click means the heavy electrical contacts in the starter mountedr starter solenoid are burned, the solenoid works (the click u hear) but because of the burned contacts the starter gets no power to engage, u can replace the contacts only for around $15 from the following link, u will need the starter motor number.

http://www.iowamotorparts.com/index.htm

Apr 23, 2009 | 1997 Mitsubishi Eclipse

2 Answers

1996 honda civic wont start


Hi Meadors,

The clicking sound you heard most likely the starter solenoid engaging the starter. Only in this case it's failing to engage the starter. This is a classic symptom of a low battery. Here's why.

In a perfect world, when you turn the key to start:
  1. the solenoid is fed 12VDC which engages an electromagnetic coil inside it.
  2. A spring loaded steel piston inside this coil reacts to the magnetic field. It is pulled against the spring. By itself this sounds like a loud decisive CLICK.
  3. The movement of the piston simultaneously pushes the starter gear into the flywheel and sends power to the starter via heavy duty contacts. The starter draws a lot of power.
  4. The starter spins, turns the engine, the engine starts, life is good.
  5. When the key is released, the solenoid disengages, the spring pushes the piston back, the starter gear disengages from the flywheel.
In our world, when you turn the key to start:
  1. The solenoid which draws it's share of power engages as before. Click.
  2. As the starter tries to spin, the power available is insufficient. It draws all remaining power, there isn't enough left to keep the solenoid active and it turns off.
  3. Since the starter isn't drawing power anymore, the solenoid re-engages and the cycle starts over. Click.
  4. The cycle repeats. Click. A series of rapid clicks. Same page?
While a dead battery is the prime suspect, there can be other causes. Things to do:

  • Check belts, specifically on the alternator.
  • Terminal connections clean and tight.
  • In the 'Let's not over look the obvious' department: Battery voltage?
  • Get a jump. Try a jump start.
  • If a jump gets you going, it is either the battery not holding a charge or the alternator not providing one.
Even new batteries can be bad off the shelf. Especially if they have been on that shelf for a while. They may show the voltage but not the amps. This is called a 'Surface Charge'.

If you don't have a voltmeter, what you need to do now is visit an auto parts store (not a shop). Most (in the hope of making a sale) will provide free testing of batteries and charging systems.

What you need is called a "Load Test" on the battery. It simulates the load of an engine being started. This will confirm the battery is good or bad.

Then with the car running, they need to check the voltage to the battery (they will know this). If it's not above +13VDC, the alternator is bad or not connected correctly.

And if it doesn't start, what better place to be?

Let me know what they and you find out by commenting.
Best regards
Mike

Jan 05, 2009 | 1996 Honda Civic

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