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While replacing my rear rotors and brake pads on my 2002chevy tahoe i found oil or grease on the emergency brake pads what could this be fro

Oil or grease on emergency break pads what is this from

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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The only things I can think of at the moment, is either brake fluid or rear end fluid.

Posted on Nov 23, 2014

  • david kephart Nov 23, 2014

    Ok I was thinking the same thing the break cylinder is not leaking so I am sure it is the seal. How do I change the seal? I also checked the level in the rear end it was low. I refilled the rear end.

  • jack layton
    jack layton Nov 23, 2014

    You remove the axle shaft to replace seal. You have to take cover off rear end, use a drain pan because that fluid is going to run out. I can give you the removal text, but, if you have a repair manual for your vehicle, it will have text and pictures, probably easier to understand. The autozone web site has free vehicle repair info and wiring diagrams. You just register your vehicle, it's free, click on vehicle repair guides, follow the links.

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Your brake cylinders are leaking, they are usually at the top and they spread the shoes apart when brakes applied, the oil is dirty brake fluid.

Posted on Nov 23, 2014

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Check oil level in rear end. Sounds like axle seal leaking, will need to pull out axle to replace seal.

Posted on Nov 23, 2014

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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You havea caliper that is leaking. This is an accumulation of brake fluid and more than likely brake dust therefore it looks like Grease. Please check your calipers and you should have noticed the leakage. Have someone press on the brakes while you were at the calipers and you will see what's going on.

Posted on Nov 23, 2014

  • FastHarley
    FastHarley Nov 23, 2014

    Havesomeone press on the brake pedal while you were at that actual brake setup. You will see the leakage of brake fluid. This stuff looks like Greece because it accumulatetion of brake dust and brake fluid.

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1 Answer

1998 dodge durango front brakes grab


Usually this is caused by grease or oil getting on rotor or pads. Remove wheels and check rotor, pads and lines for signs of a brake fluid leak or any sign of grease or oil that could have gotten on the rotor or pads.

Aug 13, 2014 | 1998 Dodge Durango

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Rear rotors


if the wheel spins freely,just use some penetrating oil and a big hammer.

Dec 30, 2013 | 2004 Buick Rendezvous

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This is a general question: New brake rotors and drums are usually delivered with some kind of antirust coating. It can be a thin layer of oil, or some primer type paint. I was told, before installing...


Remove the oil or any other coating on the surface's where the brake shoes or pads make contact. This area should be cleaned before installing brake shoes/pads. As for the sand paper for the surface, it is a good idea to lightly sand the contact surface, but just lightly. What is also important is applying anti squeal to the backside (metal side) of the brake pad before installing, and also apply a small bit of grease where the brake shoe hits the backing plate (high spot on the backing plate, there is most likely four raised areas total for each side) on the rear brake assembly....just a small amount will keep the rears from making noise also.

Feb 17, 2011 | Chrysler Neon Cars & Trucks

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I just put new brake pads on the rear of my 2004 z71 and the rear passenger side rotor - caliper gets hotter than the driver side rear! any solutions?


You might have a sticking caliper, did you inspect the hardware when you changed the pads? Were the rubber boots intact? Is there any chance you got oil or grease on the pads on one side?

Dec 04, 2010 | Chevrolet 1500 Cars & Trucks

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Replace rear brake pads


Rear disc brake pads offer better performance and are not as affected by moisture like conventional brake shoe style brakes are. Rear disc brakes are similar to front disc brakes. The main difference is that rear disc brake systems must incorporate the emergency brake system. There are two methods widely used for the emergency brake with rear disc systems. The first system is a brake shoe inside the brake disc that is actuated by the emergency brake lever. The second is a screw style actuator inside the brake caliper. When activated the brake pads are forced into the brake disc and held tightly by the emergency brake lever.
READ COMPLETELY BEFORE STARTING
Step 1 - Identify Rear Disc Brake Components
rear_brake_pads.jpg Rear disc brake assembly includes; rear brake disc, rear brake pads, brake caliper mount and a caliper mounting screw. (Note: Some vehicles do not have the rotor mounting screw.)
Step 2 - Removing the Rear Brake Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_2.jpg To replace rear brake pads and rotors the rear brake caliper needs to be removed. First loosen the rear brake caliper mount bolts and remove them. Turn counter clockwise.
Step 3 - Lift Rear Brake Caliper from The Caliper Mount
rear_brake_pads_3.jpg After the caliper mount bolts have been removed, gently lift the brake caliper from the caliper mount. Inspect the caliper slides; they should move freely in the caliper mount. Remove rear brake pads and hardware.

Step 4 - Removing Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_4.jpg With a socket wrench or other appropriate removal tool, loosen the rear brake caliper mounting bolts. Remove bolts and lift the caliper mount and remove it from the vehicle. Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole. Tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub holding on tightly, using both hands. You do not want to drop the rotor.

Step 5 - Removing Rear Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor.jpg Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole, tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub, hold on using both hands and do not drop.

Step 6 - Install New Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor_2.jpg Check the new rotor against the old brake rotor to make sure they are the same size. Clean the mating surface on the wheel hub before the new brake rotor is installed. Reinstall rotor retainer screw.
Step 7 - Reset Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brakes_7.jpg Before new brake pads can be installed, the rear brake caliper must be reset. The reset tool winds the piston back into position so the new brake pads will fit. This style of brake caliper will not compress with a clamp tool; it can only be reset with the proper reset tool.
Step 8 - Reinstall Rear Caliper Mount and Install New Rear Brake Pads
rear_brake_rotor_3.jpg After the caliper has been reset, reinstall caliper mounting bolts and make sure the bolts are tight. Then match up the old brake pads to the new brake pads. They should be exactly the same except, of course; the old ones will be worn out. Check the new brake pads for proper fit and install any brake hardware that is required.
Step 9 - Remount Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brake_rotor_4.jpg Reinstall the brake caliper, align brake pad hardware and reinstall caliper mounting bolts. (Note: align the rear peg of the brake pad to the groove in the caliper piston.) Recheck and retighten all caliper and caliper mount bolts. Bleed brake system to relieve any air in the system. Before driving the vehicle, push the brake pedal down and let it up slowly. This operation forces the brake pads to travel to the brake rotors. DO NOT DRIVE VEHICLE until proper brake pedal operation resumes. When test driving vehicle listen for any unusual noises during the operation of the brakes.
WARNING! Always have the vehicle under inspection on level ground, in park with the emergency brake on. Always wear protective eyewear, gloves and necessary clothing before inspection or work begins. Never crank an engine over when anyone is near the battery or engine. Always have an operational fire extinguisher close by, obey all first aid instructions in the event of an injury. Never stand in front or behind a vehicle when cranked over or running. When engine is cranked over keep hands and clothing away from rotating components. Never move a car without proper brake pedal operation.

Jun 01, 2010 | 1995 Saab 900

1 Answer

How to loosen emegency brake pads to remove rotor. do you need special tool


there is no rear emergency pads,
the pads that straddle the rotor are your rear brakes,
the emergency brake shoes are behind rotor

Nov 28, 2009 | 2000 Chrysler LHS

1 Answer

Help with doing pads and rotors in back.


Interesting!... What/Where did you hear about 'factory bolts shearing" I've done some research and have found NOTHING with regard to this. The rear brake service procedure is no different than the front (except, you must release the emergency brake in order to remove the rear rotors). I don't understand your concern. I sincerely hope you are resurfacing (remachining) rotors and replacing pads. It's important rotors be remachined (resurfaced) when replacing pads... if not, rotors can overheat and wear out faster than their normal lifetime.

Jun 05, 2009 | 2003 Hyundai Santa Fe

1 Answer

Steering shimmy when brakes applied


It sounds like either warped rotors or grease/oil on the pads. Jack up the front and pull the wheels off. Turn the rotors by hand to see if the rotors turn freely, then drag, then turn freely. If there is no grease or oil on the rotor surfaces, you need to either turn or replace the rotors. The job is a royal pain in the ****, so you may want to take it to a reputable shop.

Apr 04, 2009 | 1998 GMC Safari

1 Answer

Front Brakes


Interesting, disc brakes don't normally stick. Since there is no tension pressure against the pads like drum brakes.

You indicated you replaced the right caliper and the master cylinder, but no mention of the disc or the piston (Some caliper assemblies are all in one, some are not.)

Here are some thoughts:

Disc is contaminated with oil, grease, brake fluid etc, when you brake, it is absorbed by the pad, gets hot and sticks.

You didn't replace left caliper, piston isn't working well, sending all pressure to right side.

You didn't indicate, new, used or rebuilt caliper. If used, get anew/remanufactured SET of calipers and either semi-mettalic or ceramic pads, and new rotors (I used to get rotors turned, but new replacements are now generally cheaper that turning old ones. When working with brakes I always recommend you work them as a set, regardless of how good the other side looks.

Make sure you clean the rotors with a solvent to ensure any grease or anti-rust agent is removed and dry will with several paper towels.

When installing pads, ensure you do not touch the braking surface of the pad or the rotor, body oil can contaminate too.
Make sure that the siding surface of the caliper is lubricatred with silicone grease designed for calipers (little packets are available at your parts store) On my GM Cars, it is the bolts that mount the caliper, but this varies by caliper design

Hope that is

Jul 02, 2008 | 1995 Dodge Caravan

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