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We have a coolant leak on the right bank of the thermostat housing. How do we fix it?

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Posted on Nov 23, 2014

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

picatudo
  • 239 Answers

SOURCE: nissan frontier 01, leaks coolant back of engine

tie the clamp

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

MrScary66613
  • 1990 Answers

SOURCE: Coolant leak on top of intake manifold

It is Threaded and you can Use Epoxy or even Gas Line Sealing Tape to seal the Pipe. Please Rate My Response! Thanks!

Posted on Feb 08, 2009

localwonder
  • 6784 Answers

SOURCE: coolant leak

HI, if the hose that's connected to the thermostat housing is dry all around, it is defiantly the housing gasket. Remove the thermostat housing to replace gasket with new

Now, if your car is running a bit hot, the thermostat may be stuck. in this case, replace the gasket and thermostat.


Please rate and god bless:)

Posted on Apr 24, 2009

  • 532 Answers

SOURCE: remove coolant thermostat housing 5.4 vin L

well if you are talking about the hose that lays inside the engine under the intake that goes from the front drivers side to the rear middle,then yes,i had to fix my own last year.

Posted on Feb 16, 2010

  • 1796 Answers

SOURCE: leaking coolant near thermostat housing

Hi!!
The leak could be due to a busted upper radiator hose (check the hose clamp area) at the thermostat housing, a cracked thermostat housing or a bad O Ring seal in the thermostat housing. Since the thermostat is going to be removed, it would be a good idea to replace it together with the O Ring seal. Do the following:

  • Drain the cooling system.
  • Disconnect the upper radiator hose from the thermostat housing.
  • Remove the thermostat housing and the thermostat.
  • Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure.
  • Install a new O-ring seal in the thermostat housing.
  • Torque the thermostat housing bolts to 89 inch lbs. (10 Nm).
  • Fill and bleed the cooling system.
ON SOME ENGINES THE PROCEDURE IS AS FOLLOWS:
  • Drain the cooling system.
  • Remove the air cleaner outlet tube.
  • Remove the wiring from the alternator and position the harness aside.
  • Disconnect the upper radiator hose from the thermostat housing.
  • Remove the thermostat housing and the thermostat.
  • Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure.
  • Install a new O-ring seal in the thermostat housing.
  • Fill and bleed the cooling system.

ALIGN THE BLEED HOLE ON THE THERMOSTAT WITH THE NOTCH ON THE HOUSING WHICH IS AT 12 O'CLOCK POSITION.
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Good Luck!! A HELPFUL - 4 THUMBS - rating for this solution would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on Nov 21, 2010

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Just had the head gasket replaced am losing water and there are bubbles in radiator took it back told me bubbles were normal in older cars wondering if water can leak out the thermostat


Well, I've never heard that bubbles were normal in older cars. I'd say the shop was at fault for shoddy repairs. You got it back and it's leaking or losing coolant? Something they should have checked very carefully for before calling the work finished.
Possibly, the bubbles were from overheated coolant because the level was low, after you noticed the loss of water. You asked if coolant can leak from the thermostat-there is a gasket on the thermostat housing that covers the thermostat, and that housing gasket can certainly leak. And sometimes does after thermostat replacement, since the bolts are not torqued down real tight to avoid distorting the gasket and causing a leak. If you see any sign of coolant around the thermostat housing, it may be leaking there. You would need to turn the housing bolts down about a half turn, and see if that stopped the leak. If it still leaks, you would probably need a new thermostat housing gasket. Don't know if you want to confront that shop again, but they should do the service for free, it was their job to finish the job. A small task and a two dollar gasket is about it, but someone will have to drain a good portion of the coolant first. They should have checked for leaks or losing coolant.

Apr 24, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Thermostat gasket blown


Is it all one piece, the outlet pipe and the t-stat housing? The gasket goes on the bottom of the housing where it mates to the engine. If the coolant is leaking from the bottom of the housing, that would require a new gasket. If coolant is leaking where the radiator hose connects to the pipe, have you tried tightening the hose clamp?
If the outlet pipe and housing are separate, there may be an O-ring seal between them. You may want to pull off the radiator hose and check if the pipe is so badly corroded and rusted that it cannot seal anymore, or may have a hole in it, especially if it is thin metal.

Jan 09, 2013 | Mitsubishi Mirage Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to change thermostat


the radiator is filled to the top with coolant and the engine is run without the radiator cap in place, the coolant will expand and spill over as the engine warms up.
  • Drain some coolant into a clean container until the coolant level is below the thermostat housing.
  • Remove the upper radiator hose connection from the thermostat housing.
  • Loosen the housing bolts and remove the housing.
  • Remove the gasket and scrape it carefully from the surface of the housing and the mounting surface on the engine. If the gasket remains on either of the surfaces, there will probably bea coolant leak after reassembly. Some engines use a rubber O-ring to seal a thermostat housing.
  • Compare the size of the thermostat to the old one. They are of different sizes, types, and temperature ratings.
  • The temperature rating is stamped on the sensing bulb on the bottom of the thermostat. The temperature bulb faces the block.
  • When replacing a thermostat, be sure that the thermostat fits into the groove in the block or outlet housing. If the thermostat is installed upside down, the engine will overheat.
  • Install the gasket.
  • Reinstall the thermostat housing. Refill the system and run the engine or pressure test to check for leaks.
  • When the engine has reached operating temperature make sure the thermostat opens.
  • You should be able to see coolant circulating within the radiator.
  • Another way of checking thermostat operation is to feel the top of the radiator hose or use a thermometer or multimeter with a temperature probe to confirm that the coolant is warming up.
  • If the engine is overheating, but the top hose is still cool to the touch, the thermostat is stu

    CAUTION
    If the radiator is filled to the top with coolant and the engine is run without the radiator cap in place, the coolant will expand and spill over as the engine warms up.

    • Drain some coolant into a clean container until the coolant level is below the thermostat housing.
    • Remove the upper radiator hose connection from the thermostat housing.
    • Loosen the housing bolts and remove the housing.
    • Remove the gasket and scrape it carefully from the surface of the housing and the mounting surface on the engine. If the gasket remains on either of the surfaces, there will probably bea coolant leak after reassembly. Some engines use a rubber O-ring to seal a thermostat housing.
    • Compare the size of the thermostat to the old one. They are of different sizes, types, and temperature ratings.
    • The temperature rating is stamped on the sensing bulb on the bottom of the thermostat. The temperature bulb faces the block.
    • When replacing a thermostat, be sure that the thermostat fits into the groove in the block or outlet housing. If the thermostat is installed upside down, the engine will overheat.
    • Install the gasket.
    • Reinstall the thermostat housing. Refill the system and run the engine or pressure test to check for leaks.
    • When the engine has reached operating temperature make sure the thermostat opens.
    • You should be able to see coolant circulating within the radiator.
    • Another way of checking thermostat operation is to feel the top of the radiator hose or use a thermometer or multimeter with a temperature probe to confirm that the coolant is warming up.
    • If the engine is overheating, but the top hose is still cool to the touch, the thermostat is stuck closed and must be replaced.
    NOTE When a paper gasket is used and the recess is in the thermostat housing, it is a good practice to position the thermostat into the recess and glue the gasket to hold it in place. If it falls out of its groove during installation, the outlet housing can be cracked or a coolant leak will result. Before tightening the water outlet housing, try to rock it back and forth to be sure it is flush. Housings are often cracked during this step.ck closed and must be replaced.
NOTE When a paper gasket is used and the recess is in the thermostat housing, it is a good practice to position the thermostat into the recess and glue the gasket to hold it in place. If it falls out of its groove during installation, the outlet housing can be cracked or a coolant leak will result. Before tightening the water outlet housing, try to rock it back and forth to be sure it is flush. Housings are often cracked during this step

May 07, 2012 | 1998 Mercury Mystique

1 Answer

How does the thermostat fit properly in the housing


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Pacifica, 2003-2005
Removal & Installation

Print Here is how to do it,if it does'nt fit right make sure you have the right thermostat.


3.5L Engine


CAUTION Never remove pressure cap with the system hot and under pressure because serious burns from coolant can occur.

  1. Disconnect negative cable from remote jumper terminal.
  2. Drain cooling system.
  3. Disconnect radiator upper hose from thermostat housing.
  4. Remove thermostat housing bolts.
  5. Remove housing, thermostat, and gasket.

    0996b43f80204be2.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. View of the coolant outlet connector (1) and thermostat housing (2)-3.5L engine
    View of the coolant outlet connector (1) and thermostat housing (2)-3.5L engine

  6. Clean gasket sealing surfaces.

To install:
  1. Install thermostat and gasket into thermostat housing. For ease of installation, install bolts in housing for thermostat and gasket retention.
  2. Install thermostat and housing to the intake manifold. Tighten the bolts to 105 inch lbs. (12 Nm).
  3. Connect radiator hoses and install hose clamp.
  4. Refill cooling system.
  5. Connect negative cable to remote jumper terminal

May 02, 2012 | 2004 Chrysler Pacifica

2 Answers

A diagram of how to install a thermostat in a 1999 pontiac grand prix


I don't have a diagram but just text instructions which follow:

Test/Replace

CAUTION
If the radiator is filled to the top with coolant and the engine is run without the radiator cap in place, the coolant will expand and spill over as the engine warms up.

  • Drain some coolant into a clean container until the coolant level is below the thermostat housing.
  • Remove the upper radiator hose connection from the thermostat housing.
  • Loosen the housing bolts and remove the housing.
  • Remove the gasket and scrape it carefully from the surface of the housing and the mounting surface on the engine. If the gasket remains on either of the surfaces, there will probably bea coolant leak after reassembly. Some engines use a rubber O-ring to seal a thermostat housing.
  • Compare the size of the thermostat to the old one. They are of different sizes, types, and temperature ratings.
  • The temperature rating is stamped on the sensing bulb on the bottom of the thermostat. The temperature bulb faces the block.
  • When replacing a thermostat, be sure that the thermostat fits into the groove in the block or outlet housing. If the thermostat is installed upside down, the engine will overheat.
  • Install the gasket.
  • Reinstall the thermostat housing. Refill the system and run the engine or pressure test to check for leaks.
  • When the engine has reached operating temperature make sure the thermostat opens.
  • You should be able to see coolant circulating within the radiator.
  • Another way of checking thermostat operation is to feel the top of the radiator hose or use a thermometer or multimeter with a temperature probe to confirm that the coolant is warming up.
  • If the engine is overheating, but the top hose is still cool to the touch, the thermostat is stuck closed and must be replaced.
NOTE When a paper gasket is used and the recess is in the thermostat housing, it is a good practice to position the thermostat into the recess and glue the gasket to hold it in place. If it falls out of its groove during installation, the outlet housing can be cracked or a coolant leak will result. Before tightening the water outlet housing, try to rock it back and forth to be sure it is flush. Housings are often cracked during this step.

Oct 28, 2010 | Pontiac Grand Prix Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where is the thermostat


Please choose the correct steps for the size of engine that you have:

4.5L & 4.9L Engines
  1. Drain the coolant to a level below the thermostat housing.
  2. It may be necessary to remove the upper air filter assembly on some models.
  3. Remove the 2 bolts securing the upper thermostat housing to the lower housing.
  4. Remove the upper thermostat housing.
  5. Remove the thermostat and O-ring from the lower housing.

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Thermostat installation—4.5L and 4.9L engines

To install:
  1. Install the thermostat and a new O-ring to the lower housing.
  2. Install the upper thermostat housing to the lower housing. Tighten the thermostat housing bolts to 20 ft. lbs. (27 Nm).
  3. Refill the cooling system using a 50/50 mixture of water and ethylene glycol antifreeze.
  4. Start the engine and check for coolant leaks. Allow the engine to come to normal operating temperature. Recheck for coolant leaks.

4.6L Engines
  1. Drain the coolant to a level below the thermostat housing.
  2. On some vehicles, access is easier if the front-end beauty panel and the air cleaner are removed.
  3. Remove the 2 bolts securing the thermostat housing to the intake manifold.
  4. Remove the thermostat housing.
  5. Remove the thermostat and O-ring from the housing.

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Thermostat installation—4.6L Engine


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Loosen the upper radiator hose clamp at the thermostat housing


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Remove the upper radiator hose clamp from the thermostat housing


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Remove the thermostat housing retaining bolts and . . .





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. . . remove the thermostat housing from the engine


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Separate the thermostat from the housing

To install:
  1. Install the thermostat and new O-ring to the housing.
  2. Install the thermostat housing to the intake manifold. Tighten the thermostat housing bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm).
  3. Refill the cooling system using a 50/50 mixture of water and ethylene glycol antifreeze.
  4. Install the air cleaner and beauty panel, if removed.
  5. Start the engine and check for coolant leaks. Allow the engine to come to normal operating temperature. Recheck for coolant leaks.

May 23, 2010 | 1996 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Temp gauge does not move. Heat works. No Coolant leaks. Coolant level appears normal.


your thermostat is bad

heres how to fix it

  1. Drain the cooling system.
  2. Remove the air cleaner.
  3. Remove exhaust crossover pipe.
  4. Disconnect the surge tank line fitting from the coolant outlet.
  5. Remove the thermostat housing to intake manifold bolts.
  6. Remove the thermostat housing outlet and thermostat
  7. Clean the mating surfaces.

To install:
  1. Install the thermostat and housing outlet.
  2. Install the thermostat housing bolts. Tighten the thermostat housing bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm).
  3. Install exhaust crossover pipe.
  4. Connect the surge tank line fitting to the coolant outlet. Tighten the fittings to 15 ft. lbs. (21 Nm).
  5. Install the air cleaner.
  6. Fill the cooling system.
  7. Inspect the system for leaks.

Jan 23, 2010 | 2001 Oldsmobile Alero

2 Answers

Leaking coolant from a small hole located in the block right under the thermostat housing coolant inlet. we removed housing and gasket replaced gasket and installed, leaks from small hole?


water pump failure, water pump on these run off the timing chain and the timing chain runs in oil, so they could not just put a weep hole on the pump because it would go strait to the oil pan, instead they redirected the coolant from the leaking pump to just below the thermostat housing. And good luck, it's at least a 6 hour job on these. Brandon-MO

Jan 17, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Intrepid

2 Answers

Overheat & Coolant Leak


OK YOU SAID THE CAR LICKS ANTIFREEZE WHERE THE TRANY IS IF IT IS COULDBE A BAD METAL SEAL

Jul 31, 2009 | 2003 Lincoln LS

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