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Engine over heats replaced radiator, fans, thermostat,now what?

Mechanic say that there is coolant getting in to the cylinder, engine overheats is spitting back into the overflow tank, after cool down I fill with coolant top off then it will run normal for the rest of the day, until the next morning it starts all over. just replaced trans $1200 now he wants $1800 to repair, should I junk it?

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 636 Answers

It depends on how much money you have invested in this car initially. I suggest that first of all you consider replacing the hands because more than likely they are warped or cracked. You are definitely looking at around 1200 dollar investment. Shop around don't settle for the first $1,800 quote. But you definitely have warped or cracked heads. I could shed more light on this if I knew exactly what model and make vehicle we were speaking about.
A thumbs up would be greatly appreciated if this answer is helpful to you. Have a GREAT DAY and GOD BLESS YOU.

Posted on Nov 22, 2014

  • 1 more comment 
  • Leo Del REal
    Leo Del REal Nov 22, 2014

    I sorry, forgot pertinent information 2003 Saturn ION automatic 2.2

  • Leo Del REal
    Leo Del REal Nov 22, 2014

    I heard that Red Devil for leaking head gasket might work 50 50 chance .

  • Leo Del REal
    Leo Del REal Nov 22, 2014

    also forgot to mention mileage is 269,000 maybe better to replace with low mileage used engine ?

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MNfisherman
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SOURCE: 4.6 lit cadillac overheats although I replaced the thermostat

did you try replacing the radiator cap and the temp sensor?

Posted on Mar 31, 2009

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SOURCE: 2003 4.6L expedition overheating after 15-30

change the thermostat

Posted on Jun 21, 2009

roniecon
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SOURCE: Engine Cooling problem 999 Ford Taurus 6 cyl

have u bled the cooling system ?warm the car and cut the car off right before the fans come on ,let sit for 30-35 minutes,see if the coolant drops in res. if so repeat process untill coolant stops droping ,then drive car regularly if overheating stops ,but monitor it because it will drop somemore/there has been reports of new and rebuilt water pumps nt having correct propelar mounted on them/ backwards etc. if this helps let me know roniecon@gmail.com

Posted on Jun 29, 2009

  • 409 Answers

SOURCE: Cooling Fan won't come on, coolant flows into overflow tank

there is a switch in the engine intake or cylinder head that controls the cooling fans. The switch is the one with only 1 green wire hooked to it. Turn the key to run, with the engine stopped pull this wire off and touch it to a ground( cylinder head, engine block) and the fan should start, if not look at the fuse, if it does you need to replace the switch.

Posted on Mar 14, 2010

  • 210 Answers

SOURCE: 1997 honda civic over temp. Have replaced

Generally if one hose is hot, and the other hose is cold it indicates that they water is not circulating. You could have a defective thermostat. Take the thermostat out and run the engine without it. With the radiator cap off you should see a lot of water moving through. It that is the case, replace the thermostat and you should be ok. If there is no rapid movement of water it may be the impeller on the water pump came loose. This is rare, but it can happen since the impeller is usually pressed on the shaft. You should also check and see if you get a lot of bubbles when the car is running and the cap off. This often indicates a blown head gasket. Hope this helps.

Posted on Aug 10, 2010

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Car overheating causing fluid to come out of the reservoir


Change your thermostat. Ensure that your radiator fan is running at idle. See if your heat blows warm or not when the engine is warmed. if the heat is clod, then you have no water circulation in your engine. either the thermostat isnt opening up, or there is a blockage in your cooling system.

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Why is the temperature light keep coming on and the gauge keep going up and down?


Temperature Warning Light is on Inspection Service How this system works: With the exception of older, air-cooled vehicles, cars rely on a liquid called coolant (or antifreeze) to keep the engine at an optimal temperature. Coolant is a mixture of water and ethylene glycol, and it circulates around the engine block and absorbs excess heat, which keeps the engine from overheating. The coolant converts that heat to air in the radiator, and then the air is emitted, at which time the coolant is ready to absorb more heat. Without coolant, the engine would quickly ruin itself with its own heat production. Common reasons for this to happen:
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  • Broken or missing air dam: Along with the shroud, some vehicles have an air dam (or deflector) underneath the vehicle. If this is broken or missing then the air can pass underneath the vehicle but not also through the radiator, which will cause overheating. These air dams are essential in newer vehicles, as they force the air through the fan shroud.
  • Faulty coolant temperature sensor: The temperature sensor takes constant readings of the coolant temperature and sends that information to the engine control unit. Based on the temperature of the coolant, the engine control unit adjusts the ignition timing, the fuel injector pulse, and the operation of the electric cooling fan.
  • Bad water pump: The water pump is responsible for keeping the coolant cycling throughout the engine. After the coolant transfers its heat energy to the air, the water pump recirculates it around the engine so that it can absorb more heat. The most common water pump problems are a leaking pump, bad bearings, or an impeller that has rotted away due to a low coolant ratio.
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  • The thermostat may also stick open. This will not usually result in overheating, but it will waste gas.
  • Broken engine cooling fan: The engine has a cooling fan that is deployed when the coolant needs some extra help. When the coolant temperature sensor notices that the coolant temperature is getting too high, the engine control unit (on newer vehicles) will initiate the cooling fan to reduce the temperature.
  • Broken thermostatic fan clutch: Older vehicles use a thermostatic fan clutch to engage the engine cooling fan, which is mounted to the fan blades. The fan clutch uses a bi-metallic spring that tightens when the temperature increases. This acts as a "high speed" option for the fan, and when engaged, it draws more air across the radiator.
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Sep 30, 2016 | 2008 Pontiac G6

2 Answers

2002 Honda Civic...The car is overheating randomly. Replaced the thermostat,and fan relays. Car runs fine and then randomly overheats with gauge going way up and then sometimes coming down.Overheating and...


RADIATOR COOLING FAN NOT RUNNING COULD BE BAD ENGINE.COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR IS FAULTY IF COOLING FAN IS NOT TURNING ON AT SET TEMPERATURE OF 196 TO 203 DEGRESS.CHECK SEE COOLING FAN RUNNING WHEN ENGINE RUNNING HOT.IF YES FLUSH RADIATOR , FLUSH ENGINE BLOCK, HEATER CORE,REPLACE RADIATOR CAP.MAKE SURE YOU HAVE 50/50 ANTIFREEZE AND WATER IN THE COOLANT SYSTEM.CHECK WATER PUMP WEEP HOLE IF LEAKING REPLACE WATER PUMP. IF COOLANT FAN DONT TURN ON 196 TO 203 DEGREES, YOU HAVE FAULTY COOLING FAN,SHORT IN FAN WIRING OR ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR FAULTY.IGNITION TIMING WILL CAUSE ENGINE TO OVER HEAT.

Aug 17, 2011 | 1999 Honda Civic

2 Answers

My 99 alero v6 is over heating not leaking ight mite be hoses or thermostat . or head gasket but when it overb heats the smoke comes from the top of the engine


REPLACE THERMOSTAT AND RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP.IF CAR OVER HEATING WHILE IN MOTION.MORE LIKELY ITS THE THERMOSTAT,LOW COOLANT IN RADIATOR OR COOLANT SYSTEM,BAD WATER PUMP,WATER PUMP WEEP HOLE IS LEAKING, WATER PUMP NEEDS REPLACING.CHECK ENGINE OIL,IF OIL LOOKS LIKE MILK SHAKE YOU HAVE LEAKING HEAD GASKET.IF CAR IN PARK AND OVER HEATS WHILE IN A LONG TRAFFIC LINE OR.BANK DRIVE THROUGH COOLANT FAN NOT TURNING ON, BECAUSE THE ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR FAULTY.CODE SCAN CAR FOR FAULTY COOLANT FAN RELAY OR FAULTY PCM. CHECK COOLANT FAN FUSE, AND HOT WIRE THE COOLANT FAN TO MAKE SURE ITS WORKING.IF COOLANT FAN DONT WORK WHEN HOT WIRED. COOLANT FAN NEEDS REPLACING. REPLACE BOTH RADIATOR HOSES, REPLACE THERMOSTAT AND RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP.BUY NEW COOLANT ADD 50/50 WATER AND COOLANT.IF ENGINE OIL HAS ANTIFREEZE IN IT.REPLACE ENGINE OIL AND OIL FILTER TO KEEP FROM LOCKING UP THE ENGINE.GET CAR FIX.DONT KEEP DRIVING IF IT KEEP OVER HEATING,ENGINE DAMAGE WILL OCCUR.I HOPE INFORMATION I GAVE YOU WILL FIX PROBLEM.PROBLEM COULD BE LEAKING RADIATOR HOSES BUT CHANGE THERMOSTAT THATS FIRST THING I WOULD CHANGE BECAUSE IF IT CLOSED, ENGINE WILL OVER HEAT AND CRACK CYLINDER HEAD OR CRACK PISTON, COOLANT NEED TO CIRCULATE THROUGH THE ENGINE TO TAKE AWAY THE HEAT FROM ENGINE.

Apr 19, 2011 | 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

After a few minutes of driving the engine begins to overheat. The engine signal and the warning cooling light both come on. Although the engine temperature is 90 degrees, the indoor heating fan is still...


There could be 3 possible problems here.

If the dashboard is saying the engine is overheating at 90 degrees and there is still cold air coming through then the thermostat could be faulty. I would suggest that you remove the thermostat and place it in a beaker of boiling water. If the top begins to open as the temperature rises, then it is fine. If not, then the thermostat will need to be replaced.

If the thermostat is fine, I would then suggest that you check your coolant levels, the coolant pressure or make sure there isn't a crack in the radiator. If there isn't enough coolant in the system then it won't perform to its highest standards. If the coolant pressure is too low, then it won't be able to cool high temperatures, although 90 degrees isn't very high for the engine to overheat. If your radiator has a crack in it then it will be leaking coolant which would explain a low coolant level and loss of pressure.

A third problem could be air getting into the heating system which will cause air to get trapped in the radiator. This would stop the normal flow of coolant. So now I would suggest checking the cylinder head gasket and do a pressure test to see if there is any air getting into the system.

Feb 02, 2011 | 2002 Volkswagen Golf

1 Answer

Car overheated and lost all power. how do I get it to start?


ENGINE NOT GOING TO START IF GET TOO HOT FIRST THING I WOULD REPLACE THERMOSTAT AND RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP THEN ADD COOLANT UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL CORRECT THATS WHEN THERMOSTAT OPEN UP AND TOP HOSE HOT.CHECK FOR LEAKING RADIATOR HOSES CHECK TOP RADIATOR HOSE CHECK BOTTOM RADIATOR HOSE.CHECK FOR LEAKS AROUND THE RADIATOR LOOK DOWN BELOW COOLANTS FANS CHECK FOR LEAKS AT RADIATOR CORES OR LEAKS AT THE RADIATOR PLASTIC SIDE CONTAINERS. CHECK FOR LEAKS AT WATER PUMP WEEP HOLE AND CHECK FOR LEAKS AT THE HEATER HOSES AROUND ENGINE BLOCK TO THE HEATER CORE HOSES. THERE IS A REASON CAR OVERHEAT.IF CAR OVERHEAT WHILE DRIVING YOU HAVE FAULTY THERMOSTAT OR LEAKING OUT COOLANT OR BLOWN HEAD GASKET.IF ENGINE OVER HEAT WHILE SITTING DURING A LONG IDLING PERIOD.YOU COULD HAVE FAULTY COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR OR FAULTY COOLING FAN FUSE OR RELAY.HOT WIRE COOLANT TO SEE IF IT RUNS IF NO REPLACE FAN MOTOR. IF YES FAN MOTOR COULD HAVE FAULTY WIRE OR PCM FAILURE. CHECK ENGINE CRANKCASE IF OIL LOOKS LIKE MILK SHAKE ENGINE HEAD GASKET LEAKING.

Nov 26, 2010 | 2002 Mitsubishi Galant

2 Answers

My 1996 olds. aurora keeps over heating. I can just put coolant in the radiator and seconds after I start the engine, I get a low coolant reading in the information display. In addition, it spits...


Hello,

There are several problems that could be leading to an engine overheating. I will discuss some of them and you can try to act on which solutions that can help.

THERMOSTAT STUCK SHOT The thermostat, which is usually located in a housing where the upper radiator hose connects to the engine, controls the operating temperature of the engine. It does this by blocking the flow of coolant from the engine to the radiator until the engine reaches a certain temperature (usually 190 to 195 degrees F.). When this temperature is reached, the thermostat opens and allows coolant to circulate from the engine to the radiator.
If the thermostat fails to open, which can happen due to mechanical failure or if a steam pocket forms under the thermostat due to incomplete filling of the cooling system or coolant loss, no coolant will circulate between the engine and radiator, and the engine will quickly overheat.
You can check for this condition by carefully touching the upper radiator hose when the engine is first started and is warming up. If the upper radiator hose does not become hot to the touch within several minutes after starting the engine, it means the thermostat is probably defective and needs to be replaced.
CAUTION: The replacement thermostat should always have the same temperature rating as the original. Do not substitute a colder or hotter thermostat on any vehicle that has computerized engine controls as engine operating temperature affects the operation of the fuel, ignition and emissions control systems.


DEFECTIVE FAN CLUTCH
On rear wheel drive vehicles with belt-driven cooling fan, a "fan clutch" is often used to improve fuel economy. The clutch is a viscous-coupling filled with silicone oil. The clutch allows the fan to slip at high speed, which reduces the parasitic horsepower drag on the engine. If the clutch slips too much, however, the fan may not turn fast enough to keep the engine cool.
The silicone fluid inside the clutch breaks down over time and can leak out due to wear, too. If you see oily streaks radiating outward on the clutch (and/or the fan can be spun by hand with little or no resistance when the engine is off), it means the clutch is bad and needs to be replaced. Any play or wobble in the fan due to wear in the clutch also signals the need for a new clutch.


EXTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS

Leaks in radiator or heater hoses, the water pump, radiator, heater core or engine freeze plugs can allow coolant to escape. No engine can tolerate the loss of coolant for very long, so it usually overheats as soon as a leak develops.
A visual inspection of the cooling system and engine will usually reveal where the coolant is going.
Leaks in hoses can only be fixed by replacing the hose. Leaks in the water pump also require replacing the pump. But leaks in a radiator, heater hose or freeze plug may sometimes respond to a sealer added to the cooling system.


WEAK OR LEAKY RADIATOR CAP
If no leaks are apparent, the radiator cap should be pressure tested to make sure it is holding the specified pressure. If the spring inside the cap is weak (or the cap is the wrong one for the application), the engine will lose coolant out the overflow tube every time it gets hot.

INTERNAL COOLANT LEAK
If there are no visible coolant leaks, but the engine is using coolant, there may be a crack in the cylinder head or block, or a leaky head gasket that is allowing coolant to escape into the combustion chamber or crankcase.

EXHAUST RESTRICTION
In some instances a severe exhaust restriction can produce enough backpressure to cause an engine to overheat. The most likely cause of the blockage would be a plugged catalytic converter or a crushed or damaged pipe. Checking intake vacuum and/or exhaust backpressure can diagnose this kind of problem.

BAD WATER PUMP
In a high mileage engine, the impeller that pumps the coolant through the engine inside the water pump may be so badly corroded that the blades are loose or eaten away. If such is the case, the pump must be replaced. Most pump failures, however, occur at the pump shaft bearing and seal. After tens of thousands of miles of operation, the bearing and seal wear out. Coolant starts to leak out past the shaft seal, which may cause the engine to overheat due to the loss of coolant. A sealer additive will not stop this kind of leak. Replacing the water pump is the only cure.
CAUTION: A leaky water pump should be replaced without delay, not only to reduce the risk of engine overheating but to prevent catastrophic pump failure. If the shaft breaks on a rear-wheel drive vehicle, the fan may go forward and chew into the radiator ruining the radiator.


INOPERATIVE FAN MOTOR
On most front-wheel drive cars, the fan that cools the radiator is driven by an electric motor. A temperature switch or coolant sensor on the engine cycles the fan on and off as additional cooling is needed. If the temperature switch or coolant sensor (or the relay that routes power to the fan motor is bad), the fan won't come on when it is needed and the engine will overheat. Likewise, if the fan motor itself is bad, the fan won't work.
The system needs to be diagnosed to determine where the problem is so the correct component can be replaced.

Also check if you are not having a blockage in the coolants hose.

Take care and good luck

Oct 26, 2010 | 1996 Oldsmobile Aurora

5 Answers

Car will overheat while at idle


yes the head gaskets leaking on modern aluminum head engines is all to common. never overheat them, if they start to get hot shut it down and find out why, it can of course be the fans and plugged radiators or faulty thermostats but sounds like in your case the head gasket is leaking and combustion gas is entering the cooling system and this causes an overheat

Jun 08, 2010 | 2002 Mitsubishi Galant

3 Answers

Overheating when driving no mixing of the coolant and oil


The three most likely thing's cause overheating are faulty thermostat,electric fan or clogged radiator. Only at has been overheat so much it boils dry that it will cause engine trouble. Most common problem's are blown cylinder head gasket or a cracked cylinder head.
mixing coolant and water depends on where the gasket has blown or head is cracked. You will first need to check if it actually is overheating. The reason is. If the head is cracked or gasket blown then you can get a false boiling which is compresion from the cylinders blows through the crack in the head or gasket causing the coolant to blow out of the radiator cap.Fill the radiator to the top leave the cap off then start the engine.If the water blows out then you will need to remove the cylinder head check the gasket is ok. If its damaged replace if not get the head checked for crack's. If no water blow's when you start it check the thermostat is working properly. To check the thermostat put it a in a saucepan cover it with water bring the water to the boil. It should open before the water boil's but near boiling-point. If its ok then start the engine again leave it running until it boils and check the fan is running. If that's ok then its radiator problem. Their is no way to check if the radiator is ok you will need to get a new one. One last point. If the cylinder head or gasket are faulty it was caused by overheating so by just fixing the cylinder head problem is not a cure it will overheat again. Check the three things I mentioned at the begining and told you how to check them. Hope this help's. Cheer's

Aug 16, 2009 | 1992 Ford Explorer

2 Answers

Overheating,reserve coolant tank boiling I have a 2000 Ford Taurus with the similar problem. I had my water pump replaced then this started.


Ford 2000 Taurus

To solve the problem you have the things to do in this order;

) When the engine is cold top off the radiator with fluid. (When the pump was replaced the fluid should have been also)
) Make sure the radiator fluid has anti-freeze in it. This is also anti boil also !
) Add fluid to the overflow reservoir.
) Make sure the drive belt was replaced on the water pump.
) With the engine running, you can add fluid to the radiator for the first minute or so. You want to get air pockets out.
) Replace radiator cap.
) Let car warm up. When it's hot you should get the radiator fan coming on.
) When it get hotter the air-conditioning fan may come on.
) If the fan does not come on, the heat sensor is probably bad.
) If all fans come on, and it overheats, you may have a bad thermostat. Trace the upper radiator hose to where it connects to the engine. That's where it located.

Do not operate the engine when it overheats, You will damage the head gaskets and cause radiator fluid to leak into the cylinders.
If you smell radiator fluid in the exhaust fumes, it may already be leaking.

May 07, 2009 | 2000 Ford Taurus

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