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What is causing my truck to still overheat after I replaced the thermostat.

I have replaced the thermostat and refilled the coolant on the vehicle, the truck is still overheating.

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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Try this procedure:

  • The thermostat can be stuck close. If you feel the upper hose very hot and the lower hose cooler than normal, it may be a stuck thermostat.

  • Make sure the radiator and the overflow bottle are filled to the proper levels.

  • Bleed air from the coolant system:This is best done by running the engine with the radiator cap off until you see when the air bubbles stop coming up.

  • Check the radiator fans: The easiest way is to turn on the cars air conditioner and turn up the A/C fans. Both radiator fans should come on when the A/C starts

  • Make a pressure test by using a pressure testing tool (available at most auto parts stores). Use the pressure shown on your radiator cap. Most cars are 16 PSI or less, so don't exceed that pressure. Replace the radiator cap if it doesn't hold the pressure.

Posted on Apr 25, 2015

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  • Contributor
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When you fill the cooling system you must permit time for the coolant to enter the closed coolant system of the engine. This means to wait a few minutes to add more coolant or (Purge of air) in the system as it is filled. When the engine is cold check the coolant level and make sure it is full. Crank the car with the radiator cap off and watch for water flow or circulation as the engine warms up. The new thermostat will prevent circulation while the engine warms up to about 190 degrees. At 190 degrees water should flow in the radiator. A bad clutch fan if belt driven could be the problem or bad electrical fan motor. The radiator fan motor should turn on as water begins to flow. If not check the fan motor electrical connections. The only other thought is a blown head gasket between the exhaust port and cooling port from a pervious overheating situation. If you have circulation in a FULL cooling system and are not leaking coolant and the fan is operational it could be internal. To check for exhaust in the cooling system you will need a block tester from the parts store to extract coolant from the radiator that will indicate if exhaust fumes are in the coolant system.


Posted on Nov 18, 2014

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 3,767 Answers

What is year--make--model? Are you just going by the temp gage, are there other overheating issues? Is the coolant boiling or anything, are you losing coolant?
Some possibilities, air in the system, radiator, radiator fan, water pump, combustion gases in the coolant. I'm sure I'm leaving something out?

Posted on Nov 18, 2014

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SOURCE: overheating

water pump plug heater core radater plug up or head gasket

Posted on Oct 19, 2008

autodr
  • 260 Answers

SOURCE: VW Golf 2.0 is overheating after replacing thermostat.

there is a strong possibility that the impellers on the waterpump are broken!!!!. they are made out of plastic and are notorious for breaking. ck this first have seen it countless times. make sure new waterpump has metal impellers.

Posted on Dec 07, 2008

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SOURCE: 2003 VW Golf Overheats

the cylinder head has warped. replacement is the solution.

Posted on Dec 29, 2008

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SOURCE: 99 Chevy Silverado is overheating after maintance on radiator

check radiator, could b blocked, check hoses, mayb they soft, while vehicle running c if hoses r compressing, if they r would b iether radiator or hoses

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

  • 6982 Answers

SOURCE: vehicle is overheating...2000 oldsmobile silhouette

It's possible you have a blown head gasket. In that case, the heater core which is above the engine fills with exhaust and stops working. To verify this condition, check exhaust for excessive white smoke. If leak is still small, it's possible you won't see much. In that case have a shop check the radiator for hydrocarbons (exhaust). If the test shows any in cooling system, you definitely have a head gasket problem.
I'd also check the thermostat. Sometimes it can give similar symptom but more often than not this will trace back to the hg.

Posted on Apr 08, 2009

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Hello and welcome to FixYa!


If you have overheating problem, it can lead to multiple issues. You may be running on low coolant that's why the vehicle overheats. If that's the case, please add coolant and make sure that it sits on the right level, too much coolant can cause overheating too for coolant will overflow.


The vehicle may have a faulty or worn out radiator blower motor that's why it overheats. If that's the case then you will need a blower motor replacement to resolve the issue.


If the radiator is clogged with dirt and rusts this issue occurs too. The coolant doesn't flow normally on the cooling system if it's clogged. If that's the case, I strongly suggest that you have the radiator flushed to drain out dirt and rusts. If you think that the radiator served you enough then it's better to have it replaced.


Please do check the radiator hoses, If you have worn out hoses it can cause coolant leakage which can result to overheating. A tiny hole is good enough for the vehicle to overheat.


A faulty thermostat sensor can cause the issue too. If you have worn out thermostat, the fan may not trigger that's why the fan won't work when under stressed conditions. A blown radiator blower fuse can cause this issue too so I suggest that you check the radiator blower fuse and replace it when necessary.


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Hello and welcome to FixYa!


If you have overheating problem, it can lead to multiple issues. You may be running on low coolant that's why the vehicle overheats. If that's the case, please add coolant and make sure that it sits on the right level, too much coolant can cause overheating too for coolant will overflow.


The vehicle may have a faulty or worn out radiator blower motor that's why it overheats. If that's the case then you will need a blower motor replacement to resolve the issue.


If the radiator is clogged with dirt and rusts this issue occurs too. The coolant doesn't flow normally on the cooling system if it's clogged. If that's the case, I strongly suggest that you have the radiator flushed to drain out dirt and rusts. If you think that the radiator served you enough then it's better to have it replaced.


Please do check the radiator hoses, If you have worn out hoses it can cause coolant leakage which can result to overheating. A tiny hole is good enough for the vehicle to overheat.


A faulty thermostat sensor can cause the issue too. If you have worn out thermostat, the fan may not trigger that's why the fan won't work when under stressed conditions. A blown radiator blower fuse can cause this issue too so I suggest that you check the radiator blower fuse and replace it when necessary.


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Hello and welcome to FixYa!


If you have overheating problem, it can lead to multiple issues. You may be running on low coolant that's why the vehicle overheats. If that's the case, please add coolant and make sure that it sits on the right level, too much coolant can cause overheating too for coolant will overflow.


The vehicle may have a faulty or worn out radiator blower motor that's why it overheats. If that's the case then you will need a blower motor replacement to resolve the issue.


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Please do check the radiator hoses, If you have worn out hoses it can cause coolant leakage which can result to overheating. A tiny hole is good enough for the vehicle to overheat.


A faulty thermostat sensor can cause the issue too. If you have worn out thermostat, the fan may not trigger that's why the fan won't work when under stressed conditions. A blown radiator blower fuse can cause this issue too so I suggest that you check the radiator blower fuse and replace it when necessary.


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The vehicle may have a faulty or worn out radiator blower motor that's why it overheats. If that's the case then you will need a blower motor replacement to resolve the issue.


If the radiator is clogged with dirt and rusts this issue occurs too. The coolant doesn't flow normally on the cooling system if it's clogged. If that's the case, I strongly suggest that you have the radiator flushed to drain out dirt and rusts. If you think that the radiator served you enough then it's better to have it replaced.


Please do check the radiator hoses, If you have worn out hoses it can cause coolant leakage which can result to overheating. A tiny hole is good enough for the vehicle to overheat.


A faulty thermostat sensor can cause the issue too. If you have worn out thermostat, the fan may not trigger that's why the fan won't work when under stressed conditions. A blown radiator blower fuse can cause this issue too so I suggest that you check the radiator blower fuse and replace it when necessary.


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Hello and welcome to FixYa!


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Hello and welcome to FixYa!


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