Question about 1983 Dodge Pickup

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Fusible link wire gets really hot.

1984 Dodge D350 pickup, 360 motor with 100 amp alternator. When the motor is running one of the fusible links gets really hot. I have replaced the alternator and voltage regulator and nothing has changed. There are two small wires that connect to the back of the alternator. An orange or faded red wire and what looks like a pale green or yellow wire. When these two small wires are unplugged the link does not get hot. Do these wires connect to the voltage regulator? Will the battery not charge if these are left unplugged?

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  • Anonymous Mar 28, 2014

    alternator

  • Anonymous Mar 28, 2014

    hot wire to back of alternator does not charge battery, alternator tests fine,is there a fusible link in the hot wire to alternator?

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Removing the two smaller wires stops the exciter current to the alt which stops it charging.
Usually if a wire is getting hot its because:
A: Current overload..
B: Corrosion in wire restricting current.
C: Corroded terminal.

Posted on Jul 02, 2009

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Circuit Breakers

Print
One device used to protect electrical components from burning out due to excessive current is a circuit breaker. Circuit breakers open and close the flow path for the electricity rapidly in order to protect the circuit if current is excessive. A circuit breaker is used on components which are more likely to draw excessive current such as the breaker found in the light switch that protects the headlight circuit. A separate 30 amp breaker mounted on the firewall or fuse block protects the power window and seat circuits, as applicable.

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A fusible link is a protective device used in an electrical circuit and acts very much like a standard fuse. The major difference lies in that fusible links are larger and capable of conducting a higher amperage than most fuses. When the current increases beyond the rated amperage for a given link, the fusible metal of the wire link will melt, thus breaking the electrical circuit and preventing further damage to any other components or wiring. Whenever a fusible link is melted because of a short circuit, correct the cause before installing a new one. Most models have four fusible links.
REPLACING FUSIBLE LINKS

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable, followed by the positive cable. If the link is connected to the junction block or starter solenoid, disconnect it there as well.
  2. Cut the wiring harness right behind the link connector(s) and remove.
  3. Strip the insulation off the harness wire back 1 / 2 in (12.7mm).
  4. Position the clip around the new link and wiring harness or new connector and crimp it securely. Then, solder the connection, using rosin core solder and sufficient heat to guarantee a good connection. Repeat for the remaining connection.
  5. Tape all exposed wiring with electrical tape or use a heat shrink tube, if available. Where necessary, connect the link to the junction block or started solenoid. Reconnect the positive, followed by the negative battery cables.

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Thanks for your interest in FixYa.com

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