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HIGH PRESSURE A/C HOSE FROM COMPRESSOR TO CONDENSER IS LEAKING. CAN'T FIND HOSE

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Depending on where it is leaking, an a/c shop may be able to fix or build a new one. We braze and make new lines all the time.

Posted on Jul 01, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1997 ford ranger, a/c compressor keeps turning off and on only when the engine is at idle, what could be causing this?


problem high pressure switch or faulty condenser fan
the pressure in the system is going too high because the condenser is not getting cooling air when idling to allow the heat transference when changing from gas back to a liquid

May 09, 2017 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2007 ford KA blowing hot air


see this causes and fix it. God bless you
Compressor Checks
checkmark.gif Start with the compressor. Does it engage when you turn on the A/C?
If so, the compressor is working and the A/C system probably contains enough refrigerant to make cold air, so the problem is inside the HVAC unit. Replace the motor that controls the blend air door (this is a difficult job and best left to a professional since it involves tearing apart the HVAC unit -- about an 8 to 10 hour job!).
If the compressor does not engage when you turn on the A/C, see if it will run by jumping the compressor clutch wire directly to the battery (use a fused jumper wire). If the compressor works when you jump it, and the A/C blows cold air, the system contains refrigerant and the fault is likely a bad A/C compressor clutch relay or a bad clutch cycling switch or pressure switch.
If the compressor does not engage when you jump it, the problem is a bad compressor clutch.
If the clutch engages but the compressor does not turn (the belt will start to slip and squeal), the compressor is locked up and you need a new compressor.
If the compressor clutch engages and turns the compressor, but the A/C still does not blow cold air, the system is probably low on refrigerant and needs to be recharged.
Refrigerant Checks
checkmark.gif Connect an A/C pressure gauge to the HIGH SIDE service port (located in the high pressure hose that runs between the compressor and the condenser in the front of the engine compartment). The gauge will tell you if there is any pressure in the system. Simply depressing the service fitting valve with a small screwdriver to see if any refrigerant squirts out is NOT an accurate check because it tell you how much pressure is in the system. It may still have some pressure but not enough to trip the low pressure safety switch so the compressor will engage.
If your A/C system is low or out of refrigerant, check for leaks, then have the A/C system vacuum purged to remove air. After the air is out, it can be recharged with the specified amount of refrigerant. It is important to get any air out as this will reduce cooling efficiency and may make the compressor noisy.
A/C System Functional Checks
checkmark.gif If the refrigeration circuit seems to be working (refrigerant in the system, compressor running and building pressure), but there is still no cooling, the problem might be an obstruction in the orifice tube (located in the high pressure hose between the condenser in the front of the radiator, and the evaporator located in the passenger compartment). A blockage here will prevent the refrigerant from entering the evaporator or recirculating through the refrigeration circuit.
If the orifice tube is plugged, the high side pressure reading will be lower than normal, and the low side reading will also be lower than normal because no refrigerant is circulating through the system.
checkmark.gif If the refrigeration circuit seems to be functioning normally (compressor running, frost or condensation on the high pressure line from the condenser to the evaporator), but no cool air is blowing out of the ducts inside the car (and the blower is working), the fault is likely a BLEND AIR door that is stuck in the HEAT position, or possibly a badly clogged cabin air filter that is restricting airflow. Another possibility would be a fault in the automatic climate control system such as a ad interior temperature sensor or control module.

Sep 28, 2012 | 2007 Ford Ka 1.3

1 Answer

AC compressor won't kick on


The most logical reason for this is some sort of leak in the ac lines, causing low pressure-the low pressure switch then keeps the compressor clutch from engaging, to protect the compressor. The system needs to be inspected for any obvious leaks first (check hoses, fittings at the compressor or condenser, evaporator which can be hard to check due to it's hidden location)-a good way to find a leak is to charge the system with 134a that has dye in it, then expose with a blacklight.

Jun 07, 2011 | 2006 Dodge Ram 2500

2 Answers

I have a 1997 Chevy S10 and need to know what one of the ac hoses are called, it has a whole in it. Can I send a picture of the engine?


depending on where its at, it will either be a high side or a low side line, i'm at hopme righ now and dont have my manuals with me, but generally the lines after your compressor up to the dryer are high side, and from the dryer to the compressor are low side, hope i was able to help

Apr 20, 2011 | Chevrolet S 10 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

A dealership fixed my cooling system. I was told it was an airpocket in the system. Now my ac only blows hot air. They keep putting me on hold and its hot outside. any ideas?


if the low side tube is cold while the compressor is working the problem will be on air door module, or one piece of hose from intake manifold go to recirculation door is dis connected, but if he compressor is not working, there is only two reason, even the refrigerant pressure is too high or too low, if low a leak on your system, if too high overcharge or clogged expansion valve or the condenser, if refrigrant is i the right pressure and compressor is not working, check the supply on main switch, ambient temperature sensor, refrigrant pressure sensor and the high pressure sensor, if all ok,. replace compressor

Aug 05, 2010 | 1989 Ford Crown Victoria

1 Answer

What does a ac high pressure hose look like


well it looks like a hose. the high pressure (liquid) line comes off the compressor, goes to the condenser, then to the evaporator. its always the smallest diameter of the 2 lines. The larger is the low or vapor line

Jun 27, 2010 | 2001 Buick Century

1 Answer

Ac wont get cold after adding refrigerant


To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25 PSI Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI.
Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged. If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system - too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.

When the low side goes so low that it’s reading shows it is in a vacuum, the most likely cause is a bad expansion valve or blocked orifice tube. Another possibility is a restricted condenser. Blocked condensers are not as common as they used to be but if a compressor fails and comes apart inside the remnants can end up in the condenser causing it to restrict the flow of refrigerant. 

When the compressor clutch is definitely engaged and the low side is high and the high side is low, the most likely cause is that the compressor is failing - it is not pumping sufficiently. Rarely an AC clutch could be slipping but usually this will be accompanied with a squeal or chirp.

Hope this helps. If the compressor did come on and pulled the R134a in to the system, you may still be low or you may be over charged. With out any pressure readings it's had for me to say what is the problem. You could also have a bad orifice tube ( expansion valve) Good luck and hope this helps. 

Jul 03, 2009 | 1998 Ford Windstar

2 Answers

''does a new radiator need refrigerant added to it''


You need to replace the condensor, then take it to a shop to have the a/c system evacuated and recharged to purge moisture because the system was opened. That will cost around $150. You do not need to replace the receiver/dryer/suction accumulator even though they will tell you that you do.
go to car-part.com to find prices of condensor from salvage yards. Page with asterisk on it is the lowest priced part.

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The Refrigerant Cycle
During stabilized conditions (air conditioning system shutdown), the refrigerant is in a vaporized state and pressures are equal throughout the system. When the A/C compressor (19703) is in operation it increases pressure on the refrigerant vapor, raising its temperature. The high-pressure and high-temperature vapor is then released into the top of the A/C condenser core (19712).
The A/C condenser core, being close to ambient temperature, causes the refrigerant vapor to condense into a liquid when heat is removed from the refrigerant by ambient air passing over the fins and tubing. The now liquid refrigerant, still at high pressure, exits from the bottom of the A/C condenser core and enters the inlet side of the A/C evaporator core orifice (19D990).
The A/C evaporator core orifice is the restriction in the refrigerant system that creates the high pressure buildup in the A/C evaporator core (19860) and separates the high and low pressure sides of the A/C system. As the liquid refrigerant leaves this restriction, its pressure and boiling point are reduced.
The liquid refrigerant is now at its lowest pressure and temperature. As it passes through the A/C evaporator core, it absorbs heat from the passenger compartment airflow passing over the plate/fin sections of the A/C evaporator core. This addition of heat causes the refrigerant to boil (convert to gas). The now cooler passenger compartment air can no longer support the same humidity level of the warmer air and this excess moisture condenses on the exterior of the evaporator coils and fins and drains outside the vehicle.
The suction accumulator/drier (19C836) is designed to remove moisture from the refrigerant and to prevent any liquid refrigerant that may not have been vaporized in the A/C evaporator core from reaching the A/C compressor. The A/C compressor is designed to pump refrigerant vapor only, as liquid refrigerant will not compress and can damage the A/C compressor.
The refrigerant cycle is now repeated with the A/C compressor again increasing the pressure and temperature of the refrigerant.
The A/C cycling switch (19E561) interrupts compressor operation before the external temperature of the A/C evaporator core gets low enough to cause the condensed water vapor (excess humidity) to turn to ice. It does this by monitoring low side line pressure. It is known that a refrigerant pressure of approximately 210 kPa (30 psi) will yield an operating temperature of 0°C (32°F). The A/C cycling switch controls system operation in an effort to maintain this temperature.
The high side line pressure is also monitored so that A/C compressor operation can be interrupted if system pressure becomes too high.
The A/C compressor pressure relief valve (19D644) will open and vent refrigerant to relieve unusually high system pressure.
Clutch Cycling Orifice Tube Type Refrigerant System 75cc8eb.gif
Item Part Number Description 1 19E762 A/C charge valve port (low side) 2 19E561 A/C cycling switch 3 19C836 Suction accumulator/drier 4 19703 A/C compressor 5 19D644 A/C compressor pressure relief valve 6 19D594 A/C pressure cut-off switch 7 19E762 A/C charge valve port (high side) 8 19712 A/C condenser core 9 19D990 A/C evaporator core orifice 10 19860 A/C evaporator core 11 — Low pressure vapor 12 — High pressure vapor 13 — Low pressure liquid 14 — High pressure liquid

  1. Connect the R-134a A/C Refrigerant Center to the low- and high-pressure service gauge port valves.
  2. Evacuate the system until the low-pressure gauge reads at least 99.4 kPa (29.5 in-Hg) (vacuum) and as close as 101.1 kPa (30 in-Hg) as possible. Continue to operate the vacuum pump for a minimum of 45 minutes.
  3. Turn off the evacuation pump. Observe the low-pressure gauge for five minutes to make sure that the system vacuum is held. If vacuum is not held for five minutes, leak-test the system, service the leaks, and evacuate the system again.
  4. Correctly oil match the system to verify that the correct amount of refrigerant oil is present in the system. For additional information, refer to Refrigerant Oil Adding in this section.
  5. Charge the system with the specified weight of refrigerant and refrigerant oil.
  6. When no more refrigerant is being drawn into the system, start the engine and select MAX A/C operation. Set the blower motor speed to maximum and allow the remaining refrigerant to be drawn into the system. Continue to add refrigerant into the system until the specified weight of R-134a has been added. Close the charging cylinder valve and allow the system to pull any remaining refrigerant from the hose. When the suction pressure drops to approximately 207 kPa (30 psi), close the charging hose valve.

May 14, 2009 | 1995 Nissan Maxima

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