Question about 1995 Ford F250

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Voltage gauge reads low end of normal and moves up to high normal

The gauge has always read high normal (13 or 14) now it will read the same as it does when you just turn the key on, which is about 11 or 12. Then after I start it it stays there at that level. Then at random time it will move up to the high normal position. It doesn't do this moving up every time. If I put a load on it by turning on the lights and A/C it will wriggle a little but not change. Increasing RPMs will not affect it. The battery is about 3 yrs old and seems be good. What do you think?

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Replace the battery and check voltage regulator

Posted on Jul 02, 2009

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How can i fix the oil pump


see this tips and fix it. God bless you
The oil pump supplies oil to lubricate your engine. If the oil pump is worn or is not turning, the engine will suffer a loss of oil pressure, which may result in engine damage or engine failure.
The first sign of trouble may be a low oil pressure warning light, a drop in the normal reading on you oil pressure gauge (if your car has one), or the appearance of ticking or clattering sounds from your engine.
As a rule, most engines only need about 10 PSI of oil pressure for every 1,000 RPM of engine speed. Oil pressure will read higher than normal when a cold engine is first started because the oil is thick. Oil pressure will gradually drop as the engine warms up and the oil thins out. So normal oil pressure on a warm engine cruising down the highway is typically 30 PSI up to 45 PSI.
SYMPTOMS OF OIL PUMP TROUBLE
The first thing you should do if any of these symptoms occur is to stop your car, turn off the engine, let it sit for a few minutes, then check the oil level on the dipstick. If the oil level is at or below the ADD line, add a quart of oil to bring the level back up to the full mark. Add as much oil as is needed to raise the level to the full mark. Then restart the engine. If the warning light remains on, or the oil pressure reading does not climb back up to its normal range, or the engine noise does not go away, you may have a bad oil pump.
The other possibilities include a bad oil pressure sending unit, or a problem with the oil pressure warning light circuit or oil pressure gauge.
OIL PRESSURE SENDING UNIT
If the engine is NOT making any unusual noises and seems to be running normally, and the oil level on the dipstick is FULL, but you are still getting a low oil pressure warning light or low gauge reading, the fault could be a bad oil pressure sending unit.
The oil pressure sending unit is mounted on the engine block. On some applications, there is a spring-loaded pressure-sensitive diaphragm with a switch inside the sending unit. This switch completes the circuit to the low oil pressure warning light if oil pressure drops below a certain threshold. The unit may stop working if the diaphragm inside fails, if the switch is stuck, if the small hole that allows oil to enter the sending unit becomes plugged, if there is a loose, corroded or broken wiring connector at the sending unit, or there is a fault in the wiring circuit between the sending unit and warming light.
On vehicles that have an oil pressure gauge (electronic, not mechanical), the oil pressure sending unit has a small rheostat inside that sends a variable voltage signal to the oil pressure gauge when the diaphragm moves. A worn spot on the rheostat or any of the other problems just described for the simple pressure-type oil pressure switches can cause a problem.
FORD'S FAKE OIL PRESSURE GAUGE
On many Ford vehicles that were built from 1980 through the 1990s, the oil pressure sending unit has two switches, a low pressure and a high pressure. These vehicles also have an oil pressure gauge, but the reading on the gauge is not a true indication of real oil pressure. As long as the pressure to the sending unit is between high and low, the gauge will read normal. If oil pressure drops and trips the low pressure switch, the dash gauge will now read low. Or, if oil pressure goes up and trips the high switch inside the sending unit, the dash gauge will read high. Consequently, don't rely on the oil pressure gauge for an accurate reading in these vehicles. It is only a gross indication if the oil pressure is low, normal or high.
OIL GAUGE PROBLEMS
If the engine is NOT making any unusual noises and seems to be running normally, the oil level on the dipstick is FULL, and you have replaced the oil pressure sending unit but are still getting a low oil pressure reading on the dash gauge, the fault could be in the wiring circuit between the sending unit and gauge, or the gauge itself might be bad.
Check the wiring connections on both ends as well as wiring continuity between the sending unit and gauge. If no wiring faults are found, hook up a pressure gauge directly to the oil pressure port on the engine and check oil pressure with the engine running. If the engine-mounted gauge shows normal oil pressure but the dash gauge is reading low, the problem is a bad dash gauge.
On the other hand, if the engine-mounted pressure gauge reads low and you have done all of the above, chances are the oil pump is worn, or it is not picking up enough oil because of a restriction or blockage in the pickup screen in the bottom of the crankcase.
OIL PUMP PICKUP PROBLEMS
The pickup tube has a screen on the end to prevent large chunks of anything bad that ends up in the crankcase from being sucked into the pump. But we are talking BIG chunks of debris, not normal wear particles or carbon or dust or other microscopic-sized abrasive particles that can cause pump wear over time.

Sep 28, 2012 | 1996 Toyota Tercel

1 Answer

95 jeep wrangler. 4 cyl engine. Oil gauge normal with engine idle but reads high if accelerate goes all the way up


Do you have under drive pulleys? If so, you can expect that to happen. It does not mean that something is wrong. You may have a high volume oil pump too. I have under drive pulleys on my Camaro and the oil pressure and voltage readings go up. I have never had a problem with that. I would worry when the oil pressure gauge does not move at all $$$$$$.

Aug 04, 2012 | 1995 Jeep Wrangler

1 Answer

Check gages on jeep grand cherokee


If your "Check Gauges" light is on, the light means pretty much whay it says...CHECK GAUGES! One or more of your gauges is/are reading outside of normal operating range. You could be having an overheating problem (Temperature gauge near or in the red) You could be having a charging system problem (Battery or Amp gauge reading in the "discharge" or "low voltage" area.) You could be nearly out of fuel (Fuel gauge reading near empty) Your oil pressure could be low (OIl Pressure gauge reading very low)....You have to look at your gauges to find out what is going on that is not normal.

Jan 29, 2011 | 2003 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Air conditioner compressor runs - freon is up to proper level....not cooling??


BOTH High and low readings should be checked to have a better idea of what is going on with an AC system but based on the limited information… the compressor is not engaged or is not pumping. Below are some things I would check;

1. Check the high and low gauge readings with the AC on & set on MAX/Recirculate, middle vents with the engine at 2,000 RPM’s, blower speed on high.

2. Check the vent temperatures with a thermometer from the middle vents, far right & far left vents?

3. What is the outside temperature at the time the readings were taken?
4. Check to see if the condenser fan blowing strong?

5. Notice if compressor clutch is cylcling excessively.
Could be overcharged, not enough air going across condenser fins, compressor not pumping sufficiently… BOTH gauge readings are really needed to get a better idea.
Below are normal car AC pressure readings with 134A.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) – Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI

Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s – Ranges from 25-35 PSI

Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI

Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better! Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor

Thank you for using fixya and good luck, keep me posted. Be glad to help you get your A/C running again soon.

Jun 12, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

2 Answers

AC not cooling


You need to have the system vacuum evacuated, using a vacuum pump and a set of gauges, to verify that it is holding. You also must install EXACTLY the amount or refrigerant that the system calls for. Too much or too little will result in failure.

Sep 03, 2009 | 1995 Geo Prizm

1 Answer

Ac wont get cold after adding refrigerant


To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25 PSI Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI.
Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged. If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system - too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.

When the low side goes so low that it’s reading shows it is in a vacuum, the most likely cause is a bad expansion valve or blocked orifice tube. Another possibility is a restricted condenser. Blocked condensers are not as common as they used to be but if a compressor fails and comes apart inside the remnants can end up in the condenser causing it to restrict the flow of refrigerant. 

When the compressor clutch is definitely engaged and the low side is high and the high side is low, the most likely cause is that the compressor is failing - it is not pumping sufficiently. Rarely an AC clutch could be slipping but usually this will be accompanied with a squeal or chirp.

Hope this helps. If the compressor did come on and pulled the R134a in to the system, you may still be low or you may be over charged. With out any pressure readings it's had for me to say what is the problem. You could also have a bad orifice tube ( expansion valve) Good luck and hope this helps. 

Jul 03, 2009 | 1998 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

I have full gas in my car but still no cold air inside the car


If you over charged the system your a/c will not work. To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105PSI  Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25PSI  Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI
Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

With the AC on the coldest setting, use a thermometer in a middle vent. Normal vent temperature readings will vary depending on the (ambient) outside temp. The vent temperature should range from around 42-55 degrees in my experience. If normal gauge readings are obtained and the vent air is cold - STOP don’t overcharge the system. The only proper way to remove refrigerant is with a AC recovery machine so if this is being done at home I can’t emphasize enough not to over charge the system. And actually the best way to insure the proper charge is in a system, is to use an AC machine to recover the freon and then evacuate and recharge the system with the correct amount. Most cars have the specified amount on a decal under the hood. 

Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged.

If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system - too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.

Good luck and hope this helps, keep me posted be glad to answer any question you may have. 


Jul 02, 2009 | 1998 Honda Prelude

1 Answer

How do I service my A/C 2000 Chevy Impala LS


To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25 PSI Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI

Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged.

If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system - too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.

If you are going to by the recharge kit at an Auto Parts store, With the AC on the coldest setting, use a thermometer in a middle vent. Normal vent temperature readings will vary depending on the (ambient) outside temp. The vent temperature should range from around 42-55 degrees in my experience. If normal gauge readings are obtained and the vent air is cold - STOP don’t overcharge the system. The only proper way to remove refrigerant is with a AC recovery machine so if this is being done at home I can’t emphasize enough not to over charge the system. And actually the best way to insure the proper charge is in a system, is to use an AC machine to recover the freon and then evacuate and recharge the system with the correct amount. Most cars have the specified amount on a decal under the hood. 
Good luck and keep me posted, be glad to answer more questions you may have. 

Jul 02, 2009 | 2000 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

95 Deville - Low Refridgerant/AC Comp. off


To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI
Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25 PSI
Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI

Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged.
If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system - too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.

Good luck and hope this helps, keep me posted be glad to answer any question you may have. And yes the A/C system on your car uses R143a and there is a A/C pressure switch along the low pressure line or on the accumulator, it looks like a oil pressure sensor with a two wire lead cliped on it. 

Jul 02, 2009 | 1995 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

The a/c on my 2006 honda pilot is not owrking and appears to have a low refrigerant charge. I want to recharge it and find the leak with die. what is the amount of 134a to be fully charged


Adding freon or topping off a cars A/C system is the most common task performed to restore performance and get cold air blowing again. However, adding refrigerant isn’t always the solution for car air conditioning problems. There can be many other things wrong besides a system being low on refrigerant. To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

*Make sure the condenser fan comes on when the readings are being checked.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI
Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25 PSI
Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI

Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

With the AC on the coldest setting, use a thermometer in a middle vent. Normal vent temperature readings will vary depending on the (ambient) outside temp. The vent temperature should range from around 42-55 degrees in my experience. If normal gauge readings are obtained and the vent air is cold - STOP don’t overcharge the system. The only proper way to remove refrigerant is with a AC recovery machine so if this is being done at home I can’t emphasize enough not to over charge the system. And actually the best way to insure the proper charge is in a system, is to use an AC machine to recover the R143a and then evacuate and recharge the system with the correct amount. Most cars have the specified amount on a decal under the hood. 

Hope this helps. Keep me posted, be glad to help get you cooled again. 

Jul 01, 2009 | 2004 Honda Pilot

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