Question about 1999 Chevrolet Tracker

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REPLACING NEGATIVE BATTERY TERMINAL

NEGATIVE BATTERY TERMINAL CRACKED WITH CORROTION, ONE CABLE LEADING TO GROUND BUT WHERE DOES THE OTHER LEAD TO?

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The large one goes to the engine block and the little one goes to the sheetmetal of the right wheelwell. Those little ones often pull loose such that you can't imagine where it came from, it was a 5/16" headed screw into the sheet metal.

There is also a couple of bare naked ground cables that also grounds your transmission with your starter and vehicle frame close to the starter. If these get pulled in two when changing out an engine for example you will get all kinds of odd blinker problems, gauges reading off the chart full and then empty, you will swear the thing is possessed.

You could make your own and add it into the GM grounding system already in place. Bolt the big end to the block, put a screw thru a handy frame hole where ever it lays across one and finish with a smaller self tapping screw right into the fender well right thru the cable.

Posted on Jun 28, 2009

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THE BODY

Posted on Jun 28, 2009

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I have a 2001 pontiac montana and am trying to figure out how to change the starter.


STARTER REPLACEMENT (ENGINE ELECTRICAL) Document ID# 688149 Starter Replacement

Removal Procedure

Important: This vehicle uses the PG260 F1 starter motor. The starter motor is serviced only as a complete unit.
  1. Disconnect the battery ground (negative) cable from the battery. Refer to Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection.
  2. Raise and suitably support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.


  3. Remove the starter motor BAT terminal nut and electrical leads.
  4. Remove the starter motor S terminal nut and electrical lead.
  5. Remove the torque converter cover. Refer to Torque Converter Cover Replacement in Automatic Transaxle - 4T65-E.


  6. Remove the starter motor bolts.
  7. Remove the starter motor.

Installation Procedure



  1. Install the starter motor.
  2. Notice: Refer to Fastener Notice in Cautions and Notices.
  3. Install the starter motor bolts.Tighten:
    Tighten the starter motor bolts to 47 [n-m] (35 lb ft).
  4. Install the torque converter cover. Refer to Torque Converter Cover Replacement in Automatic Transaxle - 4T65-E.


  5. Install the starter motor S terminal electrical lead and nut. Tighten:
    Tighten the starter motor solenoid S terminal nut to 3 [n-m] (27 lb in).
  6. Install the starter motor BAT terminal electrical leads and nut. Tighten:
    Tighten the starter motor solenoid BAT terminal nut to 10 [n-m] (89 lb in).
  7. Lower the vehicle.
  8. Install the battery ground (negative) cable to the battery. Refer to Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection.

Aug 05, 2016 | 2001 Pontiac Montana

Tip

How to test an alternator


Diagnosing alternators are about the same on all vehicles. You will need a digital multimeter to do the tests. ( WalMart has cheap ones for around $9) <br />First, you need to make sure it isn't really a battery problem.<br />One at a time, take off each battery cable at the battery and thoroughly clean the terminals and cable ends and retighten securly. NOTE: take off negative (black) first, leave it off, then do the positive (red) cable. Re-attach positive and then negative last. This way you will avoid any contact spark on the positive side which could damage your computer or wiring.<br />Next, check the voltage on your battery. With multimeter on Volts DC 20 setting, you should get around 12.65 Volts DC. <br />NOTE: Always use red lead on meter to positive (red) cable / battery post and black lead to negative (black) cable.<br />If your battery was discharged some due to your alternator suspition, you can go to the next step and start / jump start the engine.<br />With engine running test voltage at the battery again. You should get 13.4 to 14.2 volts.<br />Wiggle your test leads, scratching at the metal battery / cable terminals to ensure a good metal contact.<br />If you get more than 14.2 volts DC, your voltage regulator in the alternator is bad and the alternator must be replaced.<br />If you get less than 13 volts DC, move your black test lead to an engine ground (metal bolt which holds the alternator on, or clean metal surface / bolt on engine itself) and see if your readings are the same. If you get a higher reading of 13.4 - 14.2 volts your negative connection (cable or attatch point on engine) is faulty.<br />If still the same (less than 13 Volts) Move your red test lead to the connection on the back of the alternator itself where the red wire connects and black lead to ground. If your voltage is higher in the 13.2-14 volt range, your positive (red) cable or connection in that circut is faulty.<br />If none of these test produces at least 13.2 volts DC, replace the alternator.<br />If you get good alternator output voltages, but your battery won't hold a charge, have your battery load tested (free at auto stores or WalMart) as it is probably bad.<br />Hope that helps!<br />Mike

on Jul 13, 2011 | GMC Jimmy Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Replace starter


Starter Replacement
Removal Procedure
Caution: Before servicing any electrical component, the ignition and start switch must be in the OFF or LOCK position and all electrical loads must be OFF, unless instructed otherwise in these procedures. If a tool or equipment could easily come in contact with a live exposed electrical terminal, also disconnect the negative battery cable. Failure to follow these precautions may cause personal injury and/or damage to the vehicle or its components.
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Refer to Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection .
  2. Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in General Information.
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  3. alt="Click here for detailed picture of above image.">
  4. Remove the positive battery cable starter motor lead nut (1) from the starter.
  5. Remove the positive battery cable lead from the starter.
  6. Remove the starter solenoid terminal lead nut (2) from the starter.
  7. Remove the starter solenoid terminal lead from the starter.
    alt="Object Number: 217190 Size: SH">
  8. alt="Click here for detailed picture of above image.">
  9. Remove the starter motor bolts (2, 3).
  10. Remove the starter motor (1).

Sep 23, 2015 | 2000 Cadillac Catera

1 Answer

Were.do I hook up the power to instaall into anotheer car


Are you asking how to hook up some jumper cables? If so, connect the two leads on the car you're jumping to the positive and negative terminals on the battery. Then connect the leads on the other end of the cables to the positive terminal (same cable as on the car to be jumped) on your battery and the other lead to a good "ground" (a manifold bolt, chassis bolt or - least desirable - the negative terminal of your battery). Be careful not to touch together or cross/switch the leads on either end of the cables once one end has been connected.
If that isn't what you're asking about, post back and we'll go from there.

Oct 08, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to replace a starter??


Ford Excursion, Expedition, Lincoln Navigator 2000-2005
Starter

Print


Removal & Installation

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.

    Negative battery cable
  2. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    NOTE To disconnect the hard-shell connector from the solenoid S terminal, grasp the plastic shell and pull off; do not pull on the wire. Pull straight off to prevent damage to the connector and S terminal.


    Starter terminal cover Terminal nut and separate the battery starter cable from the starter motor Solenoid S terminal connector, if equipped with a starter mounted solenoid
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Starter motor retaining bolts Starter motor from the vehicle

To install:
  1. Install or connect the following:

    Starter motor and retaining bolts. Tighten the bolts to 15-20 ft. lbs. (20-27 Nm). Bttery starter cable and a terminal nut to the starter motor. Tighten the terminal nuts to 79 inch lbs. (9 Nm). Slenoid S terminal connector, if equipped with a starter mounted solenoid Sarter solenoid safety cap, if equipped
  2. Lower the vehicle.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Ngative battery cable
  4. Start the engine several times to check starter motor operation.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Negative battery cable
  3. Raise the front of the truck and install jackstands beneath the frame. Firmly apply the parking brake and place blocks in back of the rear wheels.
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Wiring from the starter motor terminals Starter motor retaining bolts, loosen Starter retaining bolts while supporting the starter motor Starter from the vehicle

To install:
  1. The installation is the reverse of removal. Tighten the starter retaining bolts to 15-20 ft. lbs. (20-27 Nm)

4.6L, 5.4L & 6.8L Engines
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions section.
  2. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  3. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:
    NOTE To disconnect the hard-shell connector from the solenoid S terminal, grasp the plastic shell and pull off; do not pull on the wire. Pull straight off to prevent damage to the connector and S terminal.


    Starter terminal cover Terminal nut and separate the battery starter cable from the starter motor Solenoid S terminal connector, if equipped with a starter mounted solenoid
  5. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Starter motor retaining bolts Starter motor from the vehicle

To install:
  1. Install or connect the following:

    Starter motor and retaining bolts. Tighten the bolts to 15-20 ft. lbs. (20-27 Nm). Battery starter cable and a terminal nut to the starter motor. Tighten the terminal nuts to 79 inch lbs. (9 Nm). Solenoid S terminal connector, if equipped with a starter mounted solenoid Starter solenoid safety cap, if equipped
  2. Lower the vehicle.
  3. Connect the negative battery cable.
  4. Start the engine several times to check starter motor operation.

6.0L Diesel Engine
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions section.
  2. Disconnect the battery ground cable.
  3. Remove starter solenoid protective cap.
  4. Disconnect the starter motor electrical connections.
  5. Remove the bolts and the starter.

To install:
  1. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Tighten the starter bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm)

7.3L Engine
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Negative battery cable
  3. Raise the front of the truck and install jackstands beneath the frame. Firmly apply the parking brake and place blocks in back of the rear wheels.
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Wiring from the starter motor terminals Starter motor retaining bolts, loosen Starter retaining bolts while supporting the starter motor Starter from the vehicle

To install:
  1. The installation is the reverse of removal. Tighten the starter retaining bolts to 15-20 ft. lbs. (20-27 Nm)


Testing & Troubleshooting

Feed Circuit Test

  1. Make sure the battery is fully charged.
  2. Disconnect the Inertia Fuel Shutoff (IFS) switch.
  3. Connect a remote starter switch between the starter solenoid S-terminal and the battery positive (+) terminal.
  4. Connect the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter positive lead to the battery positive (+) post. Connect negative lead to the starter solenoid M-terminal.

    0996b43f80204e8b.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Motor feed circuit-S-terminal (1), remote starter switch (2), battery (3), Rotunda 73 digital multimeter (4), B-terminal (5), M-terminal (6)

  5. Engage the remote starter switch. Read and record the voltage. The voltage reading should be 0.5 volt or less.
  6. If the voltage reading is 0.5 volt or less, go to the Motor Ground Circuit Component Test.
  7. If the voltage reading is greater than 0.5 volt, indicating excessive resistance, move the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter negative lead to the starter solenoid B-terminal and repeat the test. If the voltage reading at the B-terminal is lower than 0.5 volt, the concern is either in the connections at the starter solenoid or in the solenoid contacts.
  8. Remove the cables from solenoid B-, S- and M-terminals. Clean the cables and connections and reinstall the cables to the correct terminals. Repeat Steps 3 through 6. If the voltage drop reading is still greater than 0.5 volt when checked at the M-terminal or less than 0.5 volt when checked at the B-terminal, the concern is in the solenoid contacts. Install a new starter motor.
  9. If the voltage reading taken at the solenoid B-terminal is still greater than 0.5 volt after cleaning the cables and connections at the solenoid, the concern is either in the positive (+) battery cable connection or in the positive battery cable itself.
  10. By moving the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter negative lead toward the battery and checking each mechanical connection point, the excessive voltage drop can be located. When the high reading disappears, the last mechanical point that was checked is the concern. Repair or install a new connection as required.

Ground Circuit Test
A slow cranking condition can be caused by resistance in the ground or return portion of the cranking circuit. Check the voltage drop in the ground circuit as follows:
  1. Disconnect the inertia fuel shutoff switch.
  2. Connect a remote starter switch between the starter solenoid S-terminal and the battery positive (+) terminal.
  3. Connect the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter positive lead to the starter motor housing (the connection must be clean and free of rust or grease). Connect the negative lead to the negative (-) battery terminal.

    0996b43f80204e8c.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Motor ground circuit-Rotunda 73 digital multimeter (1), battery (2), S-terminal (3), M-terminal (4), B-terminal (5), remote starter switch (6)

  4. Engage the remote starter switch and crank the engine. Read and record the voltage reading. The reading should be 0.2 volt or less.
  5. If the voltage drop is more than 0.2 volt, clean the negative cable connections at the battery and body connections, and retest.
  6. If the voltage drop is greater than 0.2 volt, determine which way the current is flowing in the cable.
  7. Connect the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter positive lead to the end of the cable nearest battery positive.
  8. Connect the multimeter negative lead to the terminal at the other end of the cable.
  9. Crank the engine and observe the voltage reading. The voltage reading should be 0.2 volt or lower. If the voltage drop is too high, clean the terminal ends. Retest, and if still high, install a new cable. If the voltage reading is less than 0.2 volt and the engine still cranks slowly, install a new starter motor.

Voltage Drop Test

WARNING When servicing the starter motor or performing other underhood work in the vicinity of the starter motor, be aware that the heavy gauge battery input lead at the starter solenoid is "electrically hot" at all times.

WARNING A protective cap or boot is provided over the battery input terminal on all vehicle lines and must be installed after servicing. Be sure to disconnect the battery ground cable before servicing the starter motor.
Always make the Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter connections at the component terminal rather than at the wiring end connector. Making a connection at the wiring end connector could result in false readings because the meter will not pick up a high resistance between the wiring connector and the component.

Aug 05, 2012 | 2001 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

How can I jump start my 535 diesel? The battery is in the back but I see there is a ve connection in the engine compartment. I don't know where to connect the negative lead and am scared of shorting...


You can jump to the battery or alternator or starter. All have a hot lead. Usual method is positive clamp to the battery "+" terminal and negative cable to a good ground point. This could be the "-" battery terminal, a place on the frame, or a ground point on the engine.

Aug 29, 2010 | 2008 BMW 535i Sedan

1 Answer

Tried to jump my 2003 galant and the cables would spark when trying to connect negative


Be ceratin you have jumper cables to correct terminals. Also, you may connect both jumper cables to the battery of the car your getting power from (be certain not to let other ends of cables touch) connect the positive lead of car being jumped to the battery's positive terminal, then connect the negative lead to the cars ground, not directly to the negative on the battery. Getting a spark when jumping is very common. You do not want to create the spark at the battery because the fumes from the battery acid can be explosive...... That can go very bad! When removing remove the grounded, to the jumped car, and then carefully remove the rest. Again be certain to not let the leads touch.

Please let me know if this had assited you,

Thanks,
Tom

Apr 20, 2010 | 2003 Mitsubishi Galant

2 Answers

My 1997 jeep grand cherokee tsi with a 5.2 seems to have a charging problem. the alternator is a year old and was tested twice in the last week at 2 different locations and was shown to be good. same thing...


How is the pigtail ground strap from engine block to body? Have you had engine diagnostic test done? Voltage rVOLTAGE DROP TEST
A voltage drop test is the only effective way to find excessive resistance in high amperage circuits. It's a quick and easy test that doesn't require any disassembly and will quickly show you whether or not you've got a good connection or a bad one.
To do a voltage drop test, you create a load in the circuit that's being tested. Then you use a digital volt meter (DVM) to measure the voltage drop across the live connection while it is under the load. Voltage always follows the path of least resistance, so if the circuit or connection being tested has too much resistance some of the voltage will flow through the DVM and create a voltage reading.
voltage_drop.jpg

If a connection is good, you should find little or no voltage drop and see less than 0.4 volts for most connections, and ideally less than 0.1 volts. But if you find more than a few tenths of a voltage drop across a connection, it indicates excessive resistance and a need for cleaning or repair.
CHECKING THE STARTER CIRCUIT
To check the starter circuit for excessive resistance, you need to measure the voltage drop at the battery, battery cable connections and starter while the engine is being cranked.
The first check is "available battery voltage." For the starter to crank at normal speed, the battery must be at least 75% charged (12.4 volts or higher). Low battery voltage can not only affect the starter but every other electrical system in the vehicle.
A. Set your DVM to the 20 volt scale, then connect meter positive (+) lead to battery positive (+) post (not the clamp or cable), and the meter negative (-) lead to battery negative (-) post.
B. Disable the engine so it will not start when it is cranked. (Ground the ignition coil wire, or disable the ignition circuit or fuel pump relay.) Limit cranking time to 15 seconds or less.
C. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading on the DVM. D. Next, connect your meter positive (+) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter, and the meter negative (-) lead to the starter housing.
E. While cranking the engine, record the volt reading.
F. Compare the two voltage readings. If both are the same, there are no excessive voltage drops on the positive feed side.
G. If available voltage at the starter is not within one (1) volt of battery voltage, there is excessive voltage drop in the circuit.
The next test is for voltage drop on the positive side of the starter circuit.
A. Make sure the battery is fully charged.
B. Disable ignition.
C. Set DVM on 2 volt scale.
D. Connect meter positive (+) lead to positive (+) battery post, and the meter negative (-) lead to the battery terminal stud on the starter. While cranking the engine, record the voltage reading.
The maximum allowable voltage drop including the solenoid or external relay in the starter circuit should be 0.6 volts or less.
If you find more than a 0.6 volt drop in the starter circuit, you can isolate the bad connection by using the following voltage drop tests.
* Check the positive battery post and cable connection by measuring the voltage drop between the two while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the battery post and the meter negative lead to the cable clamp. A good post/cable connection should have zero voltage drop.
* Check the positive battery cable by measuring the voltage drop end to end while cranking the engine. Connect the meter positive lead to the clamp on the positive battery cable, and the meter negative lead to the end of the cable at the starter. Crank the engine and note the voltage reading. A good cable should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
* To check the starter solenoid or relay connections, connect the meter positive lead to positive battery terminal on the solenoid or relay, and the meter negative lead to the starter motor terminal. Crank the engine and note the reading. A good connection should have a voltage drop of 0.2 volts or less.
Next, you need to check the negative side of the starter circuit. To check the entire circuit, connect the meter positive lead to a clean spot on the starter motor case and the meter negative lead to the negative battery post. Crank the engine and note the reading. The voltage drop on the negative side should be 0.3 volts or less.
If the voltage drop is too high, set your DVM to the 2 volt scale and start checking each connection on the negative side to find the bad connection or cable. Use the DVM leads to check across each connection while cranking the engine as before.
Check the negative battery post/ground cable connection (should be zero voltage drop).
Check the negative ground cable from the battery to the engine (should be 0.2 volts or less).
Check between the negative battery post and starter housing (should be 0.3 volts or less).
Check between the engine block and starter housing (should be 0.10 volts or less).
CHECKING THE CHARGING CIRCUIT
To check the alternator connections on the positive side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect the meter positive lead to the alternator output stud (B+ terminal).
C. Connect the meter negative lead to the positive (+) battery post.
D. With the engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except the rear electric defroster), check the voltage drop reading. It should be 0.5 volts or less. If higher, the connections between the alternator output stud and battery need to be cleaned. Also, look for loose connections or undersized cables.
To check the alternator connections on the negative side for excessive resistance:
A. Set DVM on 2 volt DC scale.
B. Connect meter negative lead to alternator case.
C. Connect meter positive lead to battery negative (-) post.
D. With engine running at 1,800 to 2,000 rpm with all lights and accessories on (except rear defogger), check the voltage drop reading. On the negative side, it should be 0.2 volts or less. If excessive, the connections need cleaning or the negative cable needs to be replaced. Some alternators are mounted in rubber bushings and have a separate ground strap. If so equipped, be sure to check the voltage drop across this strap, too.

egulator checked with voltmeter?

Nov 15, 2009 | 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Replace an alternator on a 2005 chevy venture (instructions)


REMOVAL PROCEDURE

IMPORTANT: This vehicle uses the PG260 F1 starter motor. The starter motor is serviced only as a complete unit.

  1. Disconnect the battery ground (negative) cable from the battery.
  2. Raise and suitably support the vehicle. Refer to Vehicle Lifting.
  3. Remove radiator air baffle assembly.
  4. Remove the starter motor BAT terminal nut and electrical leads.
  5. Remove the starter motor S terminal nut and electrical lead.
  6. Remove the torque converter co
  7. Remove the starter motor bolts.
  8. Remove the starter motor.
INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
  1. Install the starter motor.
  2. Install the starter motor bolts. Tighten the starter motor bolts to 47 N.m (35 lb ft)
  3. Install the torque converter cover.
  4. Install the starter motor S terminal electrical lead and nut. Tighten the starter motor solenoid S terminal nut to 3 N.m (27 lb in).
  5. Install the starter motor BAT terminal electrical leads and nut. Tighten the starter motor solenoid BAT terminal nut to 10 N.m (89 lb in) .
  6. Install radiator air baffle assembly.
  7. Lower the vehicle.
  8. Install the battery ground (negative) cable to the battery.

Jul 25, 2009 | 2005 Chevrolet Venture

1 Answer

Voltage drop test


First, check battery post to cable connection: positive meter lead on battery positive post, negaitve lead on battery's positive cable clamp. Crank the engine and note the reading. A good connection should have zero voltage drop. Second, check the positive cable: positve meter lead on positive battery clamp, negative lead on starter terminal connector. A good cable will show a voltage drop of .2 volts or less while cranking. Third, check the starter connection: positive meter lead on positive battery terminal on the solenoid, negative meter lead on actual starter stud. A good connection will have a voltage drop of near zero volts. Now to check the negative side of the circuit. Total drop on the ground side should be .3 volts or less and can be checked by placing positive meter lead on starter housing and negative meter lead on battery ground post. Take your reading while cranking the engine, and be sure your connection at the starter is solid and clean. If total voltage drop on this side of the circuit is excessive, complete testing at all connections in the same fashion as the positive side of the circuit. Check the following: between battery post and clamp (zero voltage drop), cable end at battery to cable end at engine. (.2 volts or less), cable end at engine to engine itself (near zero voltage drop), and finally between starter housing and engine block (.1 volts or less).

To read the entire procedure for all automotive systems read this artile:
http://www.engine-light-help.com/voltage-drop.html

Aug 31, 2008 | 1997 Chevrolet Blazer

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