Question about 1994 GMC Safari

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I have a 1994 Safari. I have removed the fusible link connector (at the battery) and cut it out of the wire harness. Now that have the new one I don't remember which circuits go to what fusible links. The connector pins are labeled A, B, C, and D. The circuits are the Anti-lock module, the HVAC blower motor relay (under the hood at the front evaporator), and two go to the fuse panel under the dash: one powers the front and rear HVAC blowers and one powers the head lights (among other things). The fusible links are: pin A & B have 2.0 SQ MM links and C & D have 1.0 links. The links at A,B,and C connect to 10AWG wire and link from pin D is soldered to a 12 AWG wire (which appears to match the wire size from the A/L module.) Which circuits go to which connector pins (through there respective fusible links)?

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  • GMC Master
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Here you go , look it up . I'm sure you can use a place to find wiring diagrams . http://www.bbbind.com/free_tsb.html Click on this link , then enter your vehicle info . year ,make , model an engine size . under system click on electrical distribution , then under subsystem click on power distribution . Hit the search button ,then click on the blue link . Show's what your asking about . Good luck

Posted on Mar 16, 2017

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Need help replacing fusible link connector

It doesn't matter because they all carry +12V to the respective circuits. What does matter is which fusible link goes to which circuit (assuming they are different) but if you didn't cut them off, then they should still be connected to the correct circuits.

Posted on Jun 14, 2010

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I have an 84 impala and my alternator belt snapped off. Once i replaced the alternator belt, the car started and drove fine except my horn, interior lights, head lights, and tail lights don't work. I...


Circuit Breakers

Print
One device used to protect electrical components from burning out due to excessive current is a circuit breaker. Circuit breakers open and close the flow path for the electricity rapidly in order to protect the circuit if current is excessive. A circuit breaker is used on components which are more likely to draw excessive current such as the breaker found in the light switch that protects the headlight circuit. A separate 30 amp breaker mounted on the firewall or fuse block protects the power window and seat circuits, as applicable.

Fusible Links

Print
A fusible link is a protective device used in an electrical circuit and acts very much like a standard fuse. The major difference lies in that fusible links are larger and capable of conducting a higher amperage than most fuses. When the current increases beyond the rated amperage for a given link, the fusible metal of the wire link will melt, thus breaking the electrical circuit and preventing further damage to any other components or wiring. Whenever a fusible link is melted because of a short circuit, correct the cause before installing a new one. Most models have four fusible links.
REPLACING FUSIBLE LINKS

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable, followed by the positive cable. If the link is connected to the junction block or starter solenoid, disconnect it there as well.
  2. Cut the wiring harness right behind the link connector(s) and remove.
  3. Strip the insulation off the harness wire back 1 / 2 in (12.7mm).
  4. Position the clip around the new link and wiring harness or new connector and crimp it securely. Then, solder the connection, using rosin core solder and sufficient heat to guarantee a good connection. Repeat for the remaining connection.
  5. Tape all exposed wiring with electrical tape or use a heat shrink tube, if available. Where necessary, connect the link to the junction block or started solenoid. Reconnect the positive, followed by the negative battery cables.

Oct 21, 2013 | 1984 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Fussable link removal


To repair any blown fuse link use the following procedure:








  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.


  2. Cut the damaged fuse link from the wiring harness and discard it. If the fuse link is one of three circuits fed by a single feed wire, cut it out of the harness at each splice end and discard it.


  3. Identify and procure the proper fuse link with butt connectors for attaching the fuse link to the harness.


  4. To repair any fuse link in a 3-link group with one feed:


    1. After cutting the open link out of the harness, cut each of the remaining undamaged fuse links close to the feed wire weld.


    2. Strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the detached ends of the two good fuse links, Then insert two wire ends into one end of a butt connector and carefully push one stripped end of the replacement fuse link into the same end of the butt connector and crimp all three firmly together.





Care must be taken when fitting the three fuse links into the butt connector as the internal diameter is a snug fit for three wires. Make sure to use a proper crimping tool. Pliers, side cutter, etc. will not apply the proper crimp to retain the wires and withstand a pull test.





    1. After crimping the butt connector to the three fuse links, cut the weld portion from the feed wire and strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the cut end. Insert the stripped end into the open end of the butt connector and crimp very firmly.


    2. To attach the remaining end of the replacement fuse link, strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the wire end of the circuit from which the blown fuse link was removed, and firmly crimp a butt connector or equivalent to the stripped wire. Then, insert the end of the replacement link into the other end of the butt connector and crimp firmly.


    3. Using rosin core solder with a consistency of 60 percent tin and 40 percent lead, solder the connectors and the wires at the repairs then insulate with electrical tape or heat shrink tubing.




Heat shrink tubing must be slipped over the wire before crimping and soldering the connection.



  1. To replace any fuse link on a single circuit in a harness, cut out the damaged portion, strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the two wire ends and attach the appropriate replacement fuse link to the stripped wire ends with two proper size butt connectors. Solder the connectors and wires, then insulate.


  2. To repair any fuse link which has an eyelet terminal on one end such as the charging circuit, cut off the open fuse link behind the weld, strip approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the cut end and attach the appropriate new eyelet fuse link to the cut stripped wire with an appropriate size butt connector. Solder the connectors and wires at the repair, then insulate.


  3. Connect the negative battery cable to the battery and test the system for proper operation.



Do not mistake a resistor wire for a fuse link. The resistor wire is generally longer and has print stating, "Resistor-don\'t cut or splice\'\'.

When attaching a single No. 16, 17, 18 or 20 gauge fuse link to a heavy gauge wire, always double the stripped wire end of the fuse link before inserting and crimping it into the butt connector for positive wire retention.

May 04, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Battery hooked up but no power at all


Most probably, due to the age of the car, the FUSIBLE LINKS that are pieces of wire with a high temperature insulation, located at the back of the battery, corrode with the battery acid vapors, and fail.
I resorted to install a 40 AMP fuse holder, like the ones used by high power stereo installers, and some fuses. It was much easier than trying to get the original fusible wire. I just cut the failed section and placed the inline fuse holder in its place. The other usual failure is on a wire connector ta that same place, that gets corroded or fatigued and fails to make a good connection. As I replaced the fusible link with the described fuse holder, I got rid othe corroded connector. I did that about three years ago on my 1991, and it has been a success.

Oct 07, 2012 | 1994 Dodge Spirit

1 Answer

94 olds 88 no power to fuel pump window seat lock evething else power up no start has spark


These circuits share a common wiring harness (I think it runs along the right side bottom, but I'm not sure if it's on top of the floor or underneath). If your vehicle has been in a collision, this harness may have been damaged (also look for evidence that it was cut by a rock if it's underneath, or a heavy object carried on the floor if it's inside). Also, check the connectors on the firewall for corrosion.
Another possibility is a broken fusible link or bad connection at the battery junction block, but if your vehicle is wired like the GM A-cars (Buick Century and similar types), the turn signals and emergency flasher may also be out.

Nov 12, 2011 | 1994 Oldsmobile 88

1 Answer

Its not turning over, i replaced the starter relay, the starter and put in a new battery. nothing comes on in the cab except the headlights, cab lights, tail lights,horn & the warning sound that comes...


Look for a fusible link or fuse link off of the starter or a set of fuses or Maxi fuse that is blown in the fuse box.

Fuse Link The fuse link is a short length of special, Hypalon (high temperature) insulated wire, integral with the engine compartment wiring harness and should not be confused with standard wire. It is several wire gauges smaller than the circuit which it protects. Under no circumstances should a fuse link replacement repair be made using a length of standard wire cut from bulk stock or from another wiring harness. To repair any blown fuse link use the following procedure:
  1. Determine which circuit is damaged, its location and the cause of the open fuse link. If the damaged fuse link is one of three fed by a common No. 10 or 12 gauge feed wire, determine the specific affected circuit.
  2. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  3. Cut the damaged fuse link from the wiring harness and discard it. If the fuse link is one of 3 circuits fed by a single feed wire, cut it out of the harness at each splice end and discard it.
  4. Identify and procure the proper fuse link and **** connectors for attaching the fuse link to the harness.
  5. To repair any fuse link in a 3-link group with one feed:
    1. After cutting the open link out of the harness, cut each of the remaining undamaged fuse links close to the feed wire weld.
    2. Strip approximately 1?2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the detached ends of the 2 good fuse links. Then insert 2 wire ends into one end of a **** connector and carefully push one stripped end of the replacement fuse link into the same end of the **** connector and crimp all three firmly together. NOTE: Care must be taken when fitting the 3 fuse links into the **** connector as the internal diameter is a snug it for 3 wires. Make sure to use a proper crimping tool. Pliers, side cutters, etc. will not apply the proper crimp to retain the wires and withstand a pull test.
    3. After crimping the **** connector to the 3 fuse links, cut the weld portion from the feed wire and strip approximately 1?2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the cut end. Insert the stripped end into the open end of the **** connector and crimp very firmly.
    4. To attach the remaining end of the replacement fuse link, strip approximately 1?2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the wire end of the circuit from which the blown fuse link was removed, and firmly crimp a **** connector or equivalent to the stripped wire. Then, insert the end of the replacement link into the other end of the **** connector and crimp firmly.
    5. Using rosin core solder with a consistency of 60 percent tin and 40 percent lead, solder the connectors and the wires at the repairs and insulate with electrical tape.
  6. To replace any fuse link on a single circuit in a harness, cut out the damaged portion, strip approximately 1?2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the 2 wire ends and attach the appropriate replacement fuse link to the stripped wire ends with 2 proper size **** connectors. Solder the connectors and wires and insulate the tape.
  7. To repair any fuse link which has an eyelet terminal on one end such as the charging circuit, cut off the open fuse link behind the weld, strip approximately 1?2 in. (13mm) of insulation from the cut end and attach the appropriate new eyelet fuse link to the cut stripped wire with an appropriate size **** connector. Solder the connectors and wires at the repair and insulate with tape.
  8. Connect the negative battery cable to the battery and test the system for proper operation. NOTE: Do not mistake a resistor wire for a fuse link. The resistor wire is generally longer and has print stating, "Resistor: don't cut or splice."
---
Fuses Fig. 1: Remove the cover from the fuse panel 88286p27.jpg
Fig. 2: Use only the fuses specified for the circuit 88286p28.jpg
Fig. 3: Firewall-mounted fuse box, turn signal and hazard flashers 84926100.gif
Fig. 4: Instrument panel-mounted fuse box 84926101.jpg
On earlier models, the fuse panel is located on the firewall above the driver's left foot. On later models, the fuse panel is located on the underside of the instrument panel, covered with an access door. prev.gif next.gif
prev.gif next.gif

Oct 15, 2010 | 1991 Ford F250

1 Answer

79 chevy k10 starter problems


Fusible Links

The engine compartment wiring harness has several fusible links. The same size wire with a special hypalon insulation must be used when replacing a fusible link.
The links are located in the following areas:
  1. A molded splice at the starter solenoid Bat terminal, a 14 gauge red wire.
  2. A 16 gauge red fusible link at the junction block to protect the unfused wiring of 12 gauge or larger wire. This link stops at the bulkhead connector.
  3. The alternator warning light and field circuitry is protected by a 20 gauge red wire fusible link used in the battery feed to voltage regular #3 terminal. The link is installed as a molded splice in the circuit at the junction block.
  4. The ammeter circuit is protected by two 20 gauge fusible links installed as molded splices in the circuit at the junction block and battery to starter circuit.
Other things it MIGHT be are the ignition switch, located on top of the steering column:

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The other thing it MIGHT be is a faulty ignition cylinder (where your key goes into to start the K10).

Check the wire harness on the steering column also.

Oct 28, 2009 | 1983 Chevrolet C1500

1 Answer

There are two wires with no power at starter. The one with the fusible link and the wire going to the start. would the fusible link being burnt cause the other wire not to have power? The starter is new we...


a burnt[blown] fusible link must be replaced with a new one ,usually soldered in place, starting circuit is only energised w/switch in start position.trace wires & check connectors.

Sep 30, 2009 | 1999 GMC Safari

1 Answer

Need help replacing fusible link connector


It doesn't matter because they all carry +12V to the respective circuits. What does matter is which fusible link goes to which circuit (assuming they are different) but if you didn't cut them off, then they should still be connected to the correct circuits.

Jun 24, 2009 | 1994 GMC Safari

1 Answer

Battery drains in 1994 safari van


It is not the fusible link, if that was the problem it would not start at all. There is an open circut some where that is draining the power. Start disconnecting non esential devices, radios, TVs that sort of thing until you trace it down. And if you have an alarm on it check that first.

Apr 15, 2009 | 1994 GMC Safari

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