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Our Ford Lynx has a temperature problem. It always overheat. What could be the Problem?

We have removed the Thermostat, but it still overheat. When we've check, the radiator fan should be running when the engine goes hot, but it doesnt and the temperature goes up. but when we've tried removing the Sensor, the fan runs, but the temperature goes to zero. Is it because we have a faulty sensor?

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Could be the sensor , this pc is not expencive you try to buy it changed and so you will eliminate one possible couse. have some one scans your car for trouble codes thats your shortcut to find the problem.

Posted on May 17, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Radiator Fan continuously running with engine off, discharging battery

It is not the fault: for long time Renault has that concept, that is to prevent engine oveheating when coolant circulation is suddenly stopped.

Radiator fan can continue to work up to 10 minutes after engine is off. You should worry about it only if it wouldn't stop even after 10 minutes.

Posted on Oct 12, 2008

  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: 2004 Jeep wrangler 4.0 - 6cyl overheating

I had the same overheating problem in my jeep ! My problem was finaly found out to be the clutch in my fan its a different kind of clutch system it work as this. When your jeep gets warmer the tighter your fan clutch gets .While cool your fan moves slowly. now to test your clutch just warm up your jeep and rev it up a bit if your fan dose not pick up speed then it is sliping.What will come out of this is that you fan will the seez and run full all the time. if you jeep dose not overheat wile moving then it is not your thermo stat period.

Posted on Oct 14, 2008

  • 1596 Answers

SOURCE: 95 grand am radiator fan only runs with AC on

Cooling Fan Temp Sensor is the First thing You Check (with what you have described) Cooling Fan Should ALways come On When The A/C is turned On as A/C Adds A Load to Engine, If Temp Sensor is Faulty it Will Not Give GROUND Signal to ECM >For COOLING FAN >RELAY to Give ground and turn ON The Fan.
There ARE 2 temp Sensors that Serve Different Purposes 1 is for Dash READING GAGE & Or TEMP LIGHT the Other is For ECM or Fan Relay (SAME Thing) you Said>""can disconnect the sensor and fan continues to run" < This Leads me to think you Changed the Wrong One. Not Questioning your Skills Just Here to Help.
TEMP SENSOR FOR 3.1L V6 is Located upper RH rear of engine compartment, near exhaust system. Temp SENSOR for 2.3L Engine is Located in LH rear of engine compartment.
I Hope this Helps Lead you to a NON-OVERHEATING Pontiac.
Good Luck and Have A Great Evening. rejakwilson

Posted on Feb 04, 2009

  • 333 Answers

SOURCE: location of the coolant temperature sensor

You will find this sensor where the fat hos comes from the radiator and conects to the engine block. It would be on the housing where the thermostat is located. If it is not there you should look for a sensor that has a wire connected to it anywhere on the engine block where a water inlet is located. I hope this helps. Don't forget to rate my answer, thanks.

Posted on Feb 13, 2009

  • 29 Answers

SOURCE: Car Overheats after 12 to 15 minutes of running. Temperature decreaes when I accelerate.

your fan is the problem...it's not turning fast enough to cool the engine off. I need more info on what type of fan you have....elec fan or a clutch fan?

Posted on Apr 24, 2009

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How to replace a thermostat on a 1990 Ford F150 xl lariat?


CAUTION
If the radiator is filled to the top with coolant and the engine is run without the radiator cap in place, the coolant will expand and spill over as the engine warms up.
  • Drain some coolant into a clean container until the coolant level is below the thermostat housing.
  • Remove the upper radiator hose connection from the thermostat housing.
  • Loosen the housing bolts and remove the housing.
  • Remove the gasket and scrape it carefully from the surface of the housing and the mounting surface on the engine. If the gasket remains on either of the surfaces, there will probably bea coolant leak after reassembly. Some engines use a rubber O-ring to seal a thermostat housing.
  • Compare the size of the thermostat to the old one. They are of different sizes, types, and temperature ratings.
  • The temperature rating is stamped on the sensing bulb on the bottom of the thermostat. The temperature bulb faces the block.
  • When replacing a thermostat, be sure that the thermostat fits into the groove in the block or outlet housing. If the thermostat is installed upside down, the engine will overheat.
  • Install the gasket.
  • Reinstall the thermostat housing. Refill the system and run the engine or pressure test to check for leaks.
  • When the engine has reached operating temperature make sure the thermostat opens.
  • You should be able to see coolant circulating within the radiator.
  • Another way of checking thermostat operation is to feel the top of the radiator hose or use a thermometer or multimeter with a temperature probe to confirm that the coolant is warming up.
  • If the engine is overheating, but the top hose is still cool to the touch, the thermostat is stuck closed and must be replaced.
NOTE When a paper gasket is used and the recess is in the thermostat housing, it is a good practice to position the thermostat into the recess and glue the gasket to hold it in place. If it falls out of its groove during installation, the outlet housing can be cracked or a coolant leak will result. Before tightening the water outlet housing, try to rock it back and forth to be sure it is flush. Housings are often cracked during this step. let me know if you need more...dc

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How do you change the thermostat on a 98 ford ranger 2.5L


CAUTION If the radiator is filled to the top with coolant and the engine is run without the radiator cap in place, the coolant will expand and spill over as the engine warms up.

  • Drain some coolant into a clean container until the coolant level is below the thermostat housing.
  • Remove the upper radiator hose connection from the thermostat housing.
  • Loosen the housing bolts and remove the housing.
  • Remove the gasket and scrape it carefully from the surface of the housing and the mounting surface on the engine. If the gasket remains on either of the surfaces, there will probably bea coolant leak after reassembly. Some engines use a rubber O-ring to seal a thermostat housing.
  • Compare the size of the thermostat to the old one. They are of different sizes, types, and temperature ratings.
  • The temperature rating is stamped on the sensing bulb on the bottom of the thermostat. The temperature bulb faces the block.
  • When replacing a thermostat, be sure that the thermostat fits into the groove in the block or outlet housing. If the thermostat is installed upside down, the engine will overheat.
  • Install the gasket.
  • Reinstall the thermostat housing. Refill the system and run the engine or pressure test to check for leaks.
  • When the engine has reached operating temperature make sure the thermostat opens.
  • You should be able to see coolant circulating within the radiator.
  • Another way of checking thermostat operation is to feel the top of the radiator hose or use a thermometer or multimeter with a temperature probe to confirm that the coolant is warming up.
  • If the engine is overheating, but the top hose is still cool to the touch, the thermostat is stuck closed and must be replaced.


When replacing the thermostat, also replace the gasket that seals the thermostat in place and is positioned between the water outlet casting and the engine block.
Generally, these gaskets are made of a composition fiber material and are die-cut to match the thermostat opening and mounting bolt configuration of the water outlet. Thermostat gaskets generally come with or without an adhesive backing. The adhesive backing of gaskets holds the thermostat securely centered in the mounting flange, leaving your both hands free to align and bolt the thermostat securely in place.
  • Remove the thermostat housing.
  • Remove the gasket and scrape it carefully from the surface of the housing and the mounting surface on the engine. If any gasket remains on either of the surfaces, there will probably be a coolant leak after reassembly.
  • Some engines use a rubber O-ring to seal a thermostat housing.
  • Install the gasket.
Hopefully this is helpfully

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