Question about 1988 Buick LeSabre

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Cam shaft gear sprocket part missing that reads cam censor. Need to get this, where can we get it? Is this a maganet.

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Yes it is. The timing cover must come off to repair this. While you are in there if its a 3800 replace the chain and tensioner. If it's 3.8 replace the two gears and chain. Along with the magnet as it goes on from the back side of the cam gear on both. Any dealer or auto parts store.

Posted on Jun 23, 2009

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2 Answers

Timing belt setting


line up the marks on crank shaft gear arrow to arrow, the front cam gear the mark goes to the middle on the rear cam gear the mark goes one notch below front gear mark they line up when the tension is put on belt.

Aug 17, 2014 | 2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser

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I have 2 engine codes on my 2005 dodge neon. they are p0325 and p0340. the car has problem starting and misses badly for a while. What is the problem and how do i fix it? thanx for the help!


the p0325 code pertains to a knock censor. the p0340 is for your cam shaft sensor. i've had this problem before. try replacing the cam shaft censor first and run the codes again to see if the other still comes up. it should fix the problem. hope this helps

Jun 24, 2014 | 2005 Dodge Neon SXT

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Need to set cams and timing on a 4.0 twin cam jag. I got the timing tools to do the project and it is not right . set cam plate, install crank plug set the chains and timing is not correct.. help me out...


I have a book here that gives the info as to how to set the timing marks so I will start with the precaution. stated Do not turn crank or cam shafts with the chains removed . Now the rest you have probably done but there is a note here that you may have missed . It says --warning ensure that the crank shaft sprockets are installed correctly. The diagram shows the sprockets together with a dot on each They are assembled with the dots either together or are on the both outsides of the sprockets. To have the sprockets so that the dots are one on the outside and one in the middle is wrong. IN effect the dots either align the sprockets so the teeth are in line which is wrong as the teeth on one sprocket has to point to the middle between of the teeth of the second sprocket. This makes one chain 1/2 tooth out to the other. The last warning is to ensure that the oil gallery blanking plate is installed correctly install one or two chain wedges to take up the slack. at this point I would say that the problem is not having the sprockets assembled correctly is where you went wrong.

Oct 01, 2013 | 2000 Jaguar S-Type

1 Answer

I changed the water pump, timing belt and idlers and set all cams as instructed, now car won't start. What did I miss?


With the engine at TDC, the small mark on the crank sprocket and intermediate shaft sprocket for the cam timing belt should be pointing at each other (also along the C/L of the center of these pulleys). Then the cam sprocket has two little arrows (triangles) opposite each other that point at the center of two holes in the sprocket. You should line up these arrows with the junction of the #1 cam tower cap and the head (you will be able to see this clearly through those holes). Then install the belt without moving any of these. Start at the crank and work to the intermediate shaft, then to the cam. There should not be any obvious slack in the belt as you do this. Finally get the belt past the tensioner, tension the belt. If you do not have the tensioner tool, then the belt is properly tensioned when you cannot rotate the belt more than 90 degrees or 1/4 turn midway between the cam and intermediate sprockets. You should turn the engine over a couple of revolutions and recheck every thing. One more method of setting the timing belt tension is that there should be approx. 5/16" of deflection from center possible midway between the cam sprocket and the crankshaft sprocket, about where the head meets the block. Also, 90 degrees twist should just be possible midway between the cam sprocket and the intermediate sprocket. I pulled this from the Haynes book.
An easy way to check your cam timing without having to look at the engine sprockets, is to turn your engine to TDC using the flywheel mark, and look at your cam sprocket. Make sure the little arrows are lined up on the cam bearing seam. I use a mirror to get a straight look at it, since your head won't fit in there :)This will ensure cam-crankshaft alignment, and the intermediate shaft alignment is not quite as critical and and be a tooth or two off since it only times the distributor, which of course can itself be rotated when you tune-up your car.NOTE: After replacing the timing belt , turn the engine over a few times by hand and recheck the tension and timing mark alignment . Get your timing light, if it has an advacne dial, set it to 12M-0, if not set the timing to 0M-0, then shine the light into the little hole in the side of the timing belt cover. You should see a hole in the cam sprocket in there, if it's in the middle of the hole, cam timing is OK, if it's towards the front, it's advanced, towards the back, it's ******** a tooth. The timing belt is adjusted by a counter weight tool. Just the weight of the tool is all the tension you need. I check with a tool rental or parts store to see if you can rent one. There is very little tension on the belt, to much and it makes noise and to little and belt will jump. So if you can, find the tool.

Oct 10, 2011 | 1998 Subaru Forester

1 Answer

I have a 1966 mustang 3.3l. i just purchased a new engine & i can't get the harmonic balancer to fit right. it's scrubbing against the timing cover when its tightened down. it seems like there...


Hi,
66 L6 200. Are the timing marks easy to see? I just did this last week on our 66 block. Just bring it to TDC on #1. Remove the pulley/dampner and the timing cover bolts. Remember to remove the front oil pan bolts to the timing cover.
I use an impact wrench on the cam bolt while holding the crank bolt so I don't slip out of TDC. You'll then have to remove the oil slinger. It just slips off the keyway on the crank snout. Carefully pry the cam sprocket to start wiggling it off the cam. Both the cam and crank sprockets are "keyed".
Get the new sprockets and chain aligned with their marks. Slip the crank sprocket on first until the cam sprocket needs mounted. Just remember to hold the crank, cam sprocket, and chain as an assembly when mounting. Once you get the cam sprocket started, start threading the bolt to hold it in place. Tap light a rubber mallet to seat it further on the end of cam.
I would then remove the cam bolt and coat it lightly with thread-loc and then thread it back in. You don't want it backing out later when your driving down the road. ( don't ask how I know). Remember to put the oil slinger back on.
Your Engine has an oil slinger.
Wayne

Jun 28, 2011 | 1966 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

I need a diagram of timing chain replacement Thank You


During most engine rebuilds, a completely new timing assembly should be installed. If wear exists on any component, replacement of the entire assembly is necessary. Wear in the chain, gears, or sprockets means a timing lag, which results in poor engine performance.
The timing chain or belt is generally installed with the gears in their correct positions. Before installing a new chain, soak it in oil.
OHC (Overhead Cam) Engines
Some OHC engines use a chain drive; others use a belt drive. Removing the cover on some OHC engines that have timing chains is more difficult, because the cover often fits between the oil pan and the cylinder head. There are special procedures for replacing cam timing components in these engines.
Before a chain repair job, perform a leakage test on non-freewheeling engines to check for bent valves, so that an accurate repair estimate can be made.
OHV (Overhead Valve) Pushrod Engines
On many OHV pushrod engines, the crankshaft sprocket is installed on the crankshaft nose and the crankshaft is rotated to position piston #1 at TDC. At this point, a mark stamped onto the crankshaft sprocket is pointing directly upward (toward the camshaft).
The camshaft sprocket is then temporarily bolted to the cam and used to rotate the cam until a mark stamped on the cam sprocket is pointing directly downward (toward the crankshaft). The sprocket is then removed from the cam (without allowing the cam to rotate).
The timing chain is looped over the cam gear, the mark on the cam gear is positioned directly downward, and the chain is looped around the crankshaft sprocket. When the cam sprocket is attached to the cam, the timing marks on the crank and cam sprockets should be pointing toward one another. NOTE THIS IS FOR 2WD 4.0

May 22, 2010 | 2005 Nissan Pathfinder

1 Answer

Does the Cam Gear, 1998 V6, ride against the


I dont know of a balance shaft in a 4.3,but if there is one it should be in line with the crank,and the cam,and it would be chain driven.

Oct 31, 2009 | 1998 GMC Jimmy

2 Answers

When i roll engine to TDC the cam shaft markes are on the bottom of cam shaft sprocket


Turn the crank shaft ONE more full turn and check the cam marks again.

Sep 12, 2009 | 2000 Dodge Intrepid

2 Answers

Need the magnet that goes with the timing chain kit.


you will have to buy it from a dealer or go to a junk yard to buy one.

Jun 24, 2009 | 1988 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

91 chevy G20


well not sure exactly why it wont line up use something to turn the crank and cam to appropiate position start sliding crank gear until cam gear is touching then start to push both at same time make sure your crank key and cam pin are bothin place On many OHV pushrod engines, the crankshaft sprocket is installed on the crankshaft nose and the crankshaft is rotated to position piston #1 at TDC. At this point, a mark stamped onto the crankshaft sprocket is pointing directly upward (toward the camshaft).
The camshaft sprocket is then temporarily bolted to the cam and used to rotate the cam until a mark stamped on the cam sprocket is pointing directly downward (toward the crankshaft). The sprocket is then removed from the cam (without allowing the cam to rotate).
The timing chain is looped over the cam gear, the mark on the cam gear is positioned directly downward, and the chain is looped around the crankshaft sprocket. When the cam sprocket is attached to the cam, the timing marks on the crank and cam sprockets should be pointing toward one another.

Feb 10, 2009 | 1992 Chevrolet G20

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