Question about 2002 Mitsubishi Montero Sport

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The a/c compressor has a slight squeak to it every time it rotates and it spins intermitently. Like one or two seconds apart. I've added sum refrigerant but nothing's changed. Sometimes it'll work fine for a little while and sometimes it won't and does the intermittent spinning with no cold air. What's the deal am I gone have to replace the compressor or is there a cheaper solution

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  • Mitsubishi Expert
  • 365 Answers

When you put Freon in, there should be oil in the freon also. Usually says it on the bottles. Make sure it is not the belt making chirp sounds either. Loose belt can make them chirps or squeaks.

These rarely go out, you can find them all over the wrecking yards also if you need one.

Posted on Jun 12, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Problem with air conditioning on 2001 mitsubishi mirage.

the air conditioning system has most likely drawn moisture this is not good take it to have the system recovered and a new restrictor valve put in. leak checked and recharged

Posted on Jun 22, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: A/C promblem

try driving around for almost 4 months and the damn thing wont blow cold. try spending thousands of dollars and it still being broken. and trying driving in florida in upwards 115 degrees with no cold ac everyday. you only have to wait 30 minutes? count yourself lucky!

Posted on Aug 13, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: the heat works sometimes and

Your radiator fluid is probably low, this will cause your problem. another thing to look at is replacing your thermostat but the main thing ide look at is filling up your radiator fluid

Posted on Jan 29, 2011

cortesbige
  • 298 Answers

SOURCE: Are there switches on the brake or gear shifter that would prevent a 2000 Eclipse RS 4 cyl from starting? Problem occurs intermittently.

could be the shifter when its not engaged in park all the way it prevents it from starting

Posted on Feb 19, 2013

  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: 2004 mitsubishi endeavor fan blower works intermittently

It sounds like your blower thermostat is working intermittently.

Posted on Mar 14, 2013

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2002 dodge ramn 4.7 has a squeak squeaks on first start up and once warm squeaks between 40 to 45 mph any faster or slower don't do it wont do it at idle brand new waterpump and belt pulley spin free


Check alternator decoupler, thats new name for mechanical pulley. Pull serpentine belt and check if alternator pulley is a one way clutch. Should freewheel in opposite direction smoothly and lock up in drive direction. If it doesnt lock up in about 1-2mm of rotation, its bad and will cause a random squeak, usually at idle and when getting off the gas at any rpm.

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Occassional squeaking from front driver-side tire


could be wheel bearing ,could be cv joint could possably be bushings in suspenion.

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Ac compressor not working


If i've seen this problem once, i've seen it 100 times. The bad part about A/C compressors is, once broken always broken. It's only replaceable. You may try cleaning any connections to it, but they're not really "rebuildable". If you know a slight bit about mechanicing, it's not a big deal to replace at home if you can get the part through an auto parts store.If not, take it to a shop to ensure no leaks. Hope this helped!

Oct 26, 2012 | 2006 Chrysler Town & Country

1 Answer

Ttrying to fine out where to put the air for the airshock


Vehicles: Cadillacs with ALC-controlled rear shock absorbers

Each rear shock absorber has an ALC (air) port. One may disconnect the ALC air line and try to add air, but this is unlikely to work, since there is no spring-loaded valve to close the port off immediately (like a tire).

A better method for inflating the rear shocks to see if they hold air is to supply 12V DC (from the battery) directly to the ALC system (air) compressor.

Debugging your Cadillac's ALC system can be a challenge. Here are a few basics.

Here's a depiction of the ALC port on the rear shock - found at the end of the ALC air tube.


12_2_2011_12_54_42_am.jpg

Fig. 1 The ALC connection on the rear shock absorber

Here's a close-up of the Cadillac ALC port on the rear shock


12_2_2011_12_59_49_am.jpg

Fig.2 Cadillac ALC air line fitting

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Automatic Level Control System - General Description
Vehicles Without Road Sensing Suspension

The Automatic Level Control (ALC) system automatically adjusts the rear height of the vehicle in response to changes in vehicle loading.

The ALC system consists of a height sensor, an air compressor assembly, an ALC compressor relay, an intake hose and filter, an air tube, and two rear shock absorbers . The air compressor assembly consists of an air compressor and an air dryer mounted on a bracket. The air compressor head is a replaceable part of the air compressor. The (air) exhaust solenoid is a non-replaceable part of the air compressor head.

The compressor is activated when the ignition is on, and weight is added to the vehicle. The exhaust solenoid is connected directly to the battery (+), enabling the system to exhaust with the ignition on or off when excess weight is removed.

Vehicles With Road Sensing Suspension
The Automatic Level Control (ALC) system automatically adjusts the rear height of the vehicle in response to changes in vehicle loading.

The ALC system consists of the CVRSS control module, two CVRSS position sensors, an air compressor assembly, an ALC compressor relay, an intake hose and filter, an air tube, and two rear shock absorbers. The air compressor assembly consists of an air compressor and an air dryer mounted on a bracket. The air compressor head is a replaceable part of the air compressor. The exhaust solenoid is a non-replaceable part of the air compressor head.

The vehicles rear vertical height is measured by the two CVRSS position sensors. These two position sensors convert this rear height measurement into an analog voltage (0 to 5 volts DC) which is read by the CVRSS control module. The control module then determines what action (exhaust, compress, or no action) shall take place. To compress, the CVRSS control module switches the low-side of the ELC compressor relay to ground.

The air compressor is enabled (switched to battery only when the ignition is on. The air compressor is activated when a sufficient amount of weight has been added to the vehicle.

The exhaust solenoid is enabled at all times. The exhaust solenoid is activated when weight is removed from the vehicle.

Automatic Level Control System Operation w/o F45

Raising the Vehicle
When a load is added to the vehicle, the vehicle body moves down causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate upward. The upward arm movement activates an internal timing circuit and, after an initial fixed delay of 17 to 27 seconds, the sensor provides a ground to complete the compressor relay circuit. The 12V (+) circuit to the compressor is then complete and the compressor runs, sending pressurized air to the shock absorbers through the air tubes.

As the shock absorbers inflate, the vehicle body moves upward rotating the actuating arm towards its original position. Once the body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the sensor opens the compressor relay circuit, and the compressor is turned off.

Air Compressor Head Relief Sequence
In order to reduce current draw during air compressor starting, the height sensor performs an air compressor head relief sequence before air compressor operation. This sequence reduces the air pressure in the air compressor cylinder during start-up. The air compressor head relief sequence occurs as follows:

Exhaust solenoid is energized.
Air compressor is activated 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
Exhaust solenoid is de-energized 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.
Lowering the Vehicle
When a load is removed from the rear of the vehicle, the body rises, causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate downward. This again activates the internal timing circuit. After the initial fixed delay, the sensor provides a ground to complete the exhaust solenoid circuit, energizing the solenoid. Now, air starts exhausting out of the shock absorbers, back through the air dryer and exhaust solenoid valve, and into the atmosphere.

As the vehicle body lowers, the actuating arm rotates to its original position. When the vehicle body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the sensor opens the exhaust solenoid circuit, which closes the exhaust solenoid and prevents air from escaping.

Air Replenishment Cycle
The sensor actuating arm position is checked when the ignition is turned on. If the sensor indicates that no height adjustment is needed, an internal timer circuit is activated. After about 35 to 55 seconds, the compressor is turned on for 3 to 5 seconds. This ensures that the shock absorbers are filled with the proper residual pressure. If weight is added to or removed from the vehicle during the time delay, the air replenishment cycle is overridden, and the vehicle rises or lowers after the normal delay.

Automatic Level Control System Operation w/ F45

Raising the Vehicle
When a load is added to the vehicle, the vehicle body moves down causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate upward. The upward arm movement activates an internal timing circuit and, after an initial fixed delay, the CVRSS control module provides a ground to complete the compressor relay circuit. The 12V (+) circuit to the compressor is then complete and the compressor runs, sending pressurized air to the shock absorbers through the air tubes.

As the shock absorbers inflate, the vehicle body moves upward rotating the actuating arm towards its original position. Once the body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the compressor relay circuit is opened and the compressor is turned off.

Air Compressor Head Relief Sequence
In order to reduce current draw during air compressor starting, the CVRSS control module performs an air compressor head relief sequence before air compressor operation. This sequence reduces the air pressure in the air compressor cylinder during start-up. The air compressor head relief sequence occurs as follows:

Exhaust solenoid is energized.
Air compressor is activated 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
Exhaust solenoid is de-energized 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.

Lowering the Vehicle
When a load is removed from the rear of the vehicle, the body rises, causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate downward. This again activates the internal timing circuit. After the initial fixed delay, the CVRSS control module provides a ground to complete the exhaust solenoid circuit, energizing the solenoid. Now, air starts exhausting out of the shock absorbers, back through the air dryer and exhaust solenoid valve, and into the atmosphere.

As the vehicle body lowers, the actuating arm rotates to its original position. When the vehicle body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the exhaust solenoid circuit is opened, which closes the exhaust solenoid and prevents air from escaping.

Air Replenishment Cycle
An air replenishment cycle (ARC) is commanded after each ignition-ON cycle. The purpose of the ARC is to ensure that the ALC system is operating at or above minimum air pressure (residual air pressure). The ARC occurs as follows:

The EXHAUST SOLENOID IS ENERGIZED 20 seconds after the ignition has been turned on.
The AIR COMPRESSOR IS ACTIVATED 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
The EXHAUST SOLENOID IS DE-ENERGIZED 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.
The AIR COMPRESSOR IS DEACTIVATED 3.2 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is de-energized.

Dec 01, 2011 | 1998 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

To add 134a, which of three wires on the pressure switch should I jump to get the compressor to run to add freon?


you don't need to jump the wires. even if the compressor clutch is not turning add the refrigerant to the low side port, it will go in through its own pressure when a safe level for the compressor to run has been reached the clutch will engage. at first the clutch will spin a second or two and stop and then begin again, from there continue adding refrigerant the clutch should spin continuously. if the clutch fails to ever engage the compressor is bad or there is a wiring problem.

May 12, 2011 | 2005 Chrysler Pacifica

2 Answers

Squealing noise when I turn on a/c button


No, they are not all the same things, but they are all good suggestions. I am going to vote for the A/C clutch/compressor as my main candidate. The compressor is driven by the serpentine belt that drives all of the accesories on your motor. The A/C compressor only asks the engine for power when the A/C is on. When the A/C is off the pulley in front of the compressor is otherwise just spinning freely with no drag to the engine. When you turn the A/C on, it kicks in the electric clutch on your compressor, therefore making the sqeaking noise. It should also happen when you turn on the defrost. The squeaking noise is probably a bad clutch(not probable) or a bad compressor. Most of the time you can't buy the clutch seperate and will have to buy a new compressor. It's time to take it to the shop. Get a few quotes and take it to the Mechanic that you like the best. Also PLEASE rate my answer.If you didn't like my answer tell me, if you did tell me.

Sep 04, 2009 | 2003 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Adding R134A to my 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited


might be in the long run, but try adding the feron first, the system must have pressure in it for the compressor to come on, might take a can and a half before the compressor comes on, also sounds like you might have a leak, so look around when filling

May 17, 2009 | 1998 Jeep Cherokee

1 Answer

Squeaking belt


If the belts are good the noise could just be the a/c compressor making noise. The compressor is the only thing that is not normally spinning until the a/c is activated and the a/c is activated by the defrost to dry the air. Cheapest thing to test is the belt I would replace the belt and if it is not the belt you can try the compressor. If it is the compressor then you have a extra belt to put on later.

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3 Answers

A metallic squeaking sound from the front driver side wheel well


On your brake pads there is a wear indicator tab. This is a metal tab that protrudes just past where the brake lining almost ends. It is there as an indicator that your brake pads are nearing the end of their life cycle and it is time to change them.
Please remember to rate this solution.

Feb 13, 2009 | 2006 Chrysler Sebring

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