Question about 1997 Volkswagen Jetta

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Engine size if 2.0L, 6 Cyl, 1997 model. It is overheating at low speed and at being idle. One guy had said that radiator fan is not getting power so something is wrong with the electric circuit. But this guy dind't know about electricals, that's when I went another shop and they estimated $550 for replacing radiator and thermostat. These guys were ripping me off. $110 for diagnostic, $286 for radiator which costs ~ $100, $68 for radiator fan switch (costs $15) and so on. But they promised that the problem will go away if I do $550 service. I have a feeling they knew what the problem was and it was probably a very small thing. However it didn't give them an opportunity to make serious money, so they were asking to change radiator where they were making almost $200 in parts alone. It's a very nice car but sometimes I feel like donating it, unless someone can find and fix it under $200. )-:

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1. you're paying for their experience and knowledge.
2. you can fix it yourself if you research electrical circuits go buy a muti meter and spend some time.

if the fan has power to it when the engine is at operating temp. the fan is dead. if it doesn't have power check the fuse or relay that sends power to it. it that's ok check the thermostate switch that tell the fan to operate (jump the switch the fan should come on.

now whose going to pay me? lol :)

Posted on Jun 23, 2009

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My VW Cabrio is overheating after 1-2 miles. Coolant in recovery tank is boiling by this time and making bubbling noises. Someone changed radiator hoses, flange, some housing. They are saying that radiator...



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