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I have a baxi solo 3pfl heating system. The heating is switched off both amd the room thermostat only the water is on but my radiators are still working absolutely boiling

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  • Cars & Trucks Expert
  • 268 Answers

Blown head & head gasket

Posted on May 08, 2014

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 449 Answers

SOURCE: over heating mitsubishi k4n engine

use 50-50 antifreeze and change your radiator cap but first drain all the old antifreeze out.. hope this help

Posted on Dec 18, 2008

  • 166 Answers

SOURCE: 1995 Nissan Maxima Over heating, no heat blowing, water not moving

Simple thing to test first would be to pressure check the radiator cap. Next would be to check for combustion gases in the radiator indicating a leaking head gasket.  It is an aluminum head and iron block engine and there is a possibility that antifreeze anti corrosionpackage runs out due to over age then fails due to too long in the engine it results in galvanic corrosion at the head gasket-commonly resulting in a failed head gasket.  There are other engines that are vastly more prone to this than the maxima engine.  If there is a leaking head gasket the gases could rise to the top of the system and block the water flow into the heater.  Listen for gurgling sound in the heater.

Posted on Feb 10, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 1999 jeep wrangler very little heat

YOUR RADIATOR HAS TRAPPED AIR IN IT AND NEEDS T BE "BURPED".

Posted on Mar 02, 2009

dynocor
  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: mazda bongo 2.5 turbo diesel 1996. over heating

no im a mechanic it sounds like that you have an air lock in the cooling system .i am familiar with ford freda and bongo and the design where the engine is is a bit far from the radiator ,so the problem with air locks magnifies.really the solution is just drain the water and refill it slowly while you are pressing and releasing,just repeat the action on the top radiator hose to get rid of any air trapping within the system,it's as simple as that really.you want it to have just water and no air as this will cause a blockage.

Posted on Nov 11, 2009

  • 52 Answers

SOURCE: water boiling problem?

Check your radiator, any coolant left?

Posted on Feb 01, 2010

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Does anybody have a video link on how to flush the cooling system on a GM 3.1L SFI OHV 6cyl motor? I need a vid for this particular motor cause mine is still overheating & i have looked everywhere.


flushing a cooling system is the same method as any other motor

do it without the thermostat fitted
or water pump opening

sacrifice an old radiator hose to adapt a garden hose fitting
for radiator flush

air in system fix
your thermostat housing has no air bleed valve
no top radiator cap

old school way
heater on full
run motor till thermostats fully open
burp radiator hoses
wait till water is running up into over flow bottle without bubble
replace cap
turn off heater
correct level in over flow bottle

why still over heating
you fitted everything i would have ... yet still overheat
possibles
leaking inlet manifold gaskets
hose clamps loose
cooling fans spinning too slow
thermostatic fan switch faulty
aluminum radiator is a big one
air ..fins bent or some water channels blocked

or possible head gasket leak




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Nov 02, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Mitsubishi shogun 1998 model 2.8 over heating no leeks water is blowing back into the overflow bottle when hot


How are you sure it is overheating? Temp gauge? Most likely are stuck thermostat, bad fan thermostat switch, bad fan. bad head gasket. Coolant going into overflow when hot is how that system is suppose to work. As it cools, fluid is drawn back into radiator. It it is not really overheating, bad radiator cap can allow coolant into reservoir more than normal.

Dec 31, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Drained radiator added prestone Radiator flush refilled and started overheating, drained radiator replaced thermostat and now I get no heat from heater,Radiator water is hot


disconnect the heat hoses going into fire wall , put hose into one with pressure and flush as it sounds like it could be bloked in the heater core,the other thing that could be the problem be the hot ,cold switch as it restricts the flow to makes the heater hoter or colder , it might need tlc or replacing as it is manaul not elec

May 08, 2012 | 1995 Toyota 4Runner

1 Answer

Over heating


Thermostats in cars are often neglected, if not totally forgotten, units. Yet they play an important role in the general performance of cars by restricting water flow until the engine has warmed-up. Thermostats are heat sensitive valves that open and close. On cars they prevent circulation of coolant to the radiator until the engine is warm enough. When the thermostat is closed water only flows through the water pump and water jacket to let the engine warm quickly. When the thermostat opens, water can then pass through the radiator for general cooling.
google_protectAndRun("ads_core.google_render_ad", google_handleError, google_render_ad); Having a car that warms quickly is particularly useful in cold weather when you want to use your car heater as soon as possible. The thermostat is in a small housing positioned where the top radiator hose connects to the engine. The best time to check or change a thermostat is when you are servicing your radiator because you need to drain the cooling system
first. Hence, a thermostat change is a good time to flush and clean your cooling system, check all radiator hoses and the radiator pressure cap. Be sure you have the correct cap on your radiator and it is not rusted. Thermostats are small, inexpensive items. You can test them by heating in water and checking their operating temperature with a thermometer. However it really is quicker and ultimately more reliable to simply fit a new one,
1. thermostat common problems (replace every 50-60k miles)
2. thermostat switch sensor (which turn your cooling fan on and off)
3. check and see if the cooling fans is running when the engine get to its operation temperature. (fan motor can be fault)

Dec 01, 2010 | 1997 Cadillac DeVille

3 Answers

I own a 1990 Chevy Lumina car. I had a new radiator put in it. Then I replaced the jhoses, water pump and thermastat. After refilling the system, I ran the motor for 7-8 minutes idling, then I ran it at...


It could be the fan temp. switch but it shouldn't have been boiling in the overflow tank. I'd recommend doing a compression test to see if you have a blown head gasket. If it's a blown head gasket, the compressed air/fuel mix being force into the cooling system could well look like boiling in the over flow tank.

Jun 26, 2010 | 1990 Chevrolet Lumina

2 Answers

Engine overheating, 2000 deville


The problem is that more heat is entering the water than is being extracted by the radiator.

But there can be a lot of causes for that. If you have a head gasket leak, it can introduce hot gasses into the water, increasing the heat load while raising the pressure in the cooling system. That in turn can push water out of the cooling system, and into the recovery reservoir, where it can't help with the cooling of the engine.

If the fins of the radiator are blocked or folded over, that part of the radiator will not contribute much to the cooling.

If the internal water passages of the radiator are blocked, the area of the radiator is effectively reduced.

A worn out bottom radiator hose can collapse from the suction of the water pump, blocking the water flow.

If the fuel mixture is too lean (not enough fuel in the given volume of air) the engine will generate quite a bit more heat, possibly overwhelming the system.

When the engine is cold, the thermostat (a valve in the hose where water exits the engine to go to the radiator) is closed. This prevents water from going to the radiator, and that in turn prevents water coming from the radiator to the engine.

Water instead leaves the engine through the heater hose near the upper radiator hose, and circulates right back to the inlet of the water pump. So the water circulated through the engine, but it has no way to shed any heat it picks up. This speeds up the warm-up process.

The water circulating this way passes by the back of the thermostat, causing the thermostat to warm up along with the water.

When the thermostat reaches its opening temperature, it starts to open, allowing some water to go out of the upper hose to the radiator, and therefore some water from the radiator to enter the engine.

Right away, the water in the engine falls below the opening temperature of the thermostat and it closes.

The newly cooled water gets warmed by the engine, raising it to the opening temperature of the thermostat, and the whole process begins again. But this time, the water coming from the radiator is just a little warmer.

Eventually, the thermostat will stay at a partially opened position where the cooling by the radiator just matches the necessary heat loss through the radiator.

If there is not enough water, the surface area of the radiator is effectively less.
If the radiator is blocked, or the fan is not working properly, the surface area of the radiator is effectively less.

If the thermostat doesn't open properly, the radiator is not sufficiently utilized.

If too much heat is generated by the engine, it can over heat (heavy load at low speed will make a lot of heat without spinning the water pump fast enough, for instance).

These are a few preliminary tests to see what's going on. With a stone cold engine, start it and let it idle. The heater hose leaving the thermostat area should begin to heat up but not the upper radiator hose.

Once the heater hose starts to become uncomfortably hot, the upper radiator hose should start to warm up, slowly at first.

If the heater hose does not heat up, there might be insufficient flow throw that part of the system.

There is a quick check a shop can perform to see if you have exhaust in the water. There is a syringe they can use to draw the vapor in the radiator through a sensing liquid. If it changes color, you have a head gasket leak.

The radiator cap only need to be replaced if it is letting the coolant move into the reservoir improperly. If you coolant level remains fine, that is probably not a problem.

Jun 20, 2010 | 2001 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

I have a 85 2.5 4 cyl fiero. I replaced the water pump and thermostat. Still over heat, seems as if water is not flowing thru system. Please help


Air in the system might be the culprit. There are several techniques out there but filling the system with car level on the ground will not get all the air out. Without getting all the air out, it will overheat. I believe one of the techniques is to fill the system (at the thermostat housing) with the rear end lifted and the radiator cap off until the fluid flows out at the radiator. Then put the radiator cap on and finish filling it up. Also make sure your electric fan on the radiator is working as well as the temperature switch on the engine. I was having trouble with the fan relay and it wouldn't bring the fan on. Additionally at idle, there just doesn't seem to be enough flow so the temperature tends to rise when sitting at idle for any length of time. Unless you live up north, you may want to remove the thermostat. Down south, my engine heats up just fine without confining the water flow and with the limitations in the stock system, you'll never have a problem of running it "cool" anyway!

Nov 29, 2009 | 1985 Pontiac Fiero

2 Answers

Finding the thermostat in a 1987 suzuki swift


Not familiar with your vehicle but engines of that period will normally have them hidden under a fitting that probably is a diamond-shaped cast aluminum piece with one of the radiator hoses leading to it and held in place by two (rarely more) bolts.
It will be either on the head or the block.

Just follow the (large) hoses from the radiator and the one with a fitting as described will likely have the thermostat concealed under it.

Jul 04, 2008 | Suzuki Swift Cars & Trucks

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