Question about 2000 Chevrolet Blazer

2 Answers

I have oil leaking from either the timing chain 4.6l 32v oil get on the fan belt

Posted by on

2 Answers

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that has over 10 points.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 17 Answers

???

Posted on Jun 16, 2014

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 104 Answers

It would be the timing chain cover or the crank sensor on the lower right front of engine to the side of your crank pully

Posted on May 31, 2014

2 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 14036 Answers

SOURCE: I have oil leaking from either the timing chain or the front main

MOST OF THE TIME OIL LEAKING PROBLEMS WOUND BE THE CRANKSHAFT FRONT OIL SEAL.

Posted on May 25, 2010

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Does a 2000 volvo s80 have a timing chain or timing belt?


It has a belt. If cracked, replace it immediately! Go to Matthews Volvo Site and look for: 99' S80 T6 Cam Seal Replacement/ Oil Leak Repair,Timing,PCV

Jul 03, 2014 | 2000 Volvo S80

2 Answers

My 04 seabring is still overheating after replaceing the thermostat, and then wont start


If you have the 2.7L engine, you may have a bad water pump. The water pump is turned by the timing chain. When the water pump on those particular engines go out, tension on the chain goes away and retards the camshafts bad enough for it not wanting to start. Pull your oil dipstick out and see if you see signs of water in the oil. If there is, this is your problem. When the water pump goes out on those engines, it'll drain water straight into the front of the oil pan.

Mar 10, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Oil leak front engine timing chan


1995 Tracker would have a timing BELT. Normal oil leak points (in order) on a Suzuki G16 engine are the distributor base (rear of motor), valve cover (top of motor), front main seal (behind lower timing belt cog) cam seal (behind the upper timing belt cog) and rear main seal. (behind the flywheel). I'd suspect the front main seal or cam seal. I use foot power to help find oil leaks.

Dec 24, 2012 | 1995 Geo Tracker

1 Answer

My wife drove my 1992 Honda Accord for approximately 4-5 miles with oil light on. Turns out the car was leaking.leaking its oil from timing chain area. Is there any engine damage?


Possibly, but I'd replace the leaking gasket/seal.
Also note, the Honda uses a timing belt (not a chain), and you don't want oil on the belt. If there's a chance the belt has gotten oil on it, you want to take the timing belt cover off, remove the belt, and clean all the oil covered parts. The oil can wear out the belt as well as cause the belt to slip timing

Nov 19, 2011 | 1992 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Aligning the valve timing mareks except twincam engine


Timing Chain, Sprockets, Front Cover and Seal REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION Crankshaft Damper and Front Oil Seal
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Cooling fans
    • Crankshaft pulley and damper, using a holding fixture as shown
    • Front crankshaft seal Fig. 1: Crankshaft pulley removal tool - V8 9301jg12.gif
    To install:
  3. Install oil seal replacer tool JD-235 to the oil seal. Use the nut and bolt provided with the tool to fully seat the seal to the timing cover.
  4. For dampers which DO NOT utilize a spit locking ring:
    1. Apply a thin, even coating of Loctite® 648 to the damper bore. Do not apply it to the end faces or to the crankshaft.
    2. Install the crankshaft damper onto the crankshaft. Wipe off any Loctite that has squeezed out from the front of the damper.
    3. Install the locking tool to the damper. Tighten the bolt to 59 ft. lbs. (80 Nm), plus an 80 degree turn.
  5. For dampers which utilize a spit locking ring:
    1. Install a new O-ring seal to the damper.
    2. Install the crankshaft damper.
    3. Apply petroleum jelly to the damper bore and O-ring seal.
    4. Install the damper onto the crankshaft.
    5. Install the split locking ring onto the crankshaft, inside the center bore of the damper.
    6. Install the locking tool to the damper.
    7. Tighten the damper bolt to 266-285 ft. lbs. (364-386 Nm).
    8. Remove the locking tool from the damper.
  6. Install or connect the following:
    • Cooling fans
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Negative battery cable
  7. Start the engine and check for leaks.
Timing Cover
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Drain the cooling system.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable
    • Upper radiator hose
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Water pump pulley
    • Accessory drive belt tensioner
    • Idler pulley
    • Crankshaft damper
    • Engine appearance covers
    • Mass Air Flow (MAF) meter
    • Air intake assembly
    • Ignition coils
    • Canister purge valve
    • Valve covers
    • Variable Valve Timing (VVT) solenoids
    • Engine harness retaining clips
    • Timing cover
    To install: Fig. 2: Sealant application points - V8 9301jg23.gif
    Fig. 3: Timing cover torque sequence-V8 9307jg01.gif

  4. Apply sealant to the 8 joints on the engine face as shown.
  5. Install or connect the following:
    • Timing cover with new seals. Tighten the bolts in sequence to 96-120 inch lbs. (11-13 Nm).
    • Engine harness retaining clips
    • VVT solenoids
    • Valve covers
    • Canister purge valve
    • Ignition coils
    • Air intake assembly
    • MAF meter
    • Engine appearance covers
    • Crankshaft damper
    • Idler pulley
    • Accessory drive belt tensioner
    • Water pump pulley
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Upper radiator hose
    • Negative battery cable
  6. Fill the cooling system.
  7. Start the engine and check for leaks.
Timing Chain 6 CYLINDER
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Valve cover
    • Timing chain cover
    • Variable Valve Timing (VVT) sensor
    • Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor
  3. Rotate the crankshaft until the triangular arrow indent on the driveplate is visible through the access hole.
  4. Install the Crankshaft Setting Peg JD 216 into the CKP sensor location.
  5. Install the Camshaft Locking tool JD 215 on the camshafts.
  6. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Camshaft sprocket mounting bolt by loosening it
    • VVT mounting bolt by loosening it
    • Camshaft Locking tool JD 215
    • Primary timing chain tensioner and backing plate
    • Primary timing chain guide
    • VVT unit and exhaust camshaft sprocket
    • Secondary timing chain tensioner and guide
    NOTE: Keep all valvetrain components in order for assembly. To install:
  7. Prepare the timing chain tensioners for installation by using a paperclip or other wire to unseat the check valves and compressing the pistons into their bores.
  8. Install or connect the following:
    • Secondary timing chain guide. Tighten the bolt to 89-124 inch lbs. (10-14 Nm).
    • Secondary timing chain tensioner. Tighten the bolt to 89-124 inch lbs. (10-14 Nm).
    • VVT, secondary timing chain and exhaust cam sprocket
    • Primary timing chain
    • Primary timing chain guide. Tighten the bolt to 10-12 ft. lbs. (13-16 Nm).
    • Primary timing chain tensioner and backing plate. Tighten the bolts to 89-124 inch lbs. (10-14 Nm).
    • Primary timing chain slack, eliminate it by placing a wedge between the primary timing chain tensioner and the guide shoe
    • Secondary timing chain by applying counterclockwise force to the exhaust camshaft sprocket. Fig. 4: Apply force in a counterclockwise direction when tightening the sprocket mounting bolts - 6 cylinder 9301jg03.gif

    • Exhaust and intake VVT sprocket bolts. Tighten them to 85-92 ft. lbs. (115-125 Nm).
  9. Remove the tools and wedges.
  10. Install or connect the following:
    • CKP sensor
    • VVT sensor
    • Coolant outlet pipe
    • ECT sensor connector
    • Radiator and heater hoses
    • Timing chain cover
    • Valve cover
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Negative battery cable
  11. Fill the cooling system.
  12. Start the engine and check for leaks.
prev.gif next.gif

Jan 28, 2011 | 1999 Jaguar XK8

1 Answer

My 2001 jeep grand Cherokee will not start don?t know why no codes are coming up put new cam sen, crank sen, coil pack, new ecu, new coolant temp sen, it turns over but will not run has injector pulse and...


Timing Chain, Sprockets, Front Cover and Seal REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 2.5L and 4.0L Engines
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Cooling fan and shroud
    • Crankshaft damper
    • Front crankshaft seal
    • Accessory brackets
    • Front cover
    • Oil slinger
  3. Rotate the crankshaft so that the timing marks are aligned. Fig. 1: Timing chain alignment marks — 2.5L and 4.0L engines 7924pg20.gif

  4. Remove the timing chain and sprockets. To install:
  5. For 2.5L engines, turn the timing chain tensioner lever to the unlock (down) position. Pull the tensioner block toward the tensioner lever to compress the spring. Hold the block and turn the tensioner lever to the lock (up) position. Fig. 2: Timing chain tensioner — 2.5L engines 7924pg19.gif

  6. Install the timing chain and sprockets with the timing marks aligned. Tighten the camshaft sprocket bolt to 80 ft. lbs. (108 Nm) for 2.5L engines or to 50 ft. lbs. (68 Nm) for 4.0L engines.
  7. For 2.5L engines, release the timing chain tensioner.
  8. Install or connect the following:
    • Oil slinger
    • New front crankshaft seal to the front cover
    • Front cover, using a new gasket
    • Timing Case Cover Alignment and Seal Installation Tool 6139 in the crankshaft opening to center the front cover Fig. 3: Timing Case Cover Alignment and Seal Installation Tool 6139 — 2.5L and 4.0L engines 7924pg21.gif

  9. Tighten the front cover bolts as follows:
    1. Step 1: Cover-to-block 1⁄4 inch bolts to 60 inch lbs. (7 Nm)
    2. Step 2: Cover-to-block 5⁄16 inch bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm)
    3. Step 3: Oil pan-to-cover 1⁄4 inch bolts to 85 inch lbs. (9.5 Nm)
    4. Step 4: Oil pan-to-cover 5⁄16 inch bolts to 11 ft. lbs. (15 Nm)
  10. Install or connect the following:
    • Accessory brackets
    • Crankshaft damper. Tighten the bolt to 80 ft. lbs. (108 Nm).
    • Cooling fan and shroud
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Negative battery cable
  11. Start the engine and check for leaks.

Jul 30, 2010 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

I have a 1999 chevy malibu that has a coolant leak. The leak seem to be coming from underneath the fan belt end of the motor. As soon as I put water in the coolant jug it leaks on the ground.


Check the lower radiator hoses for a leak and the lower part of the radiator itself for a leak. Also, check your engine oil level and make sure you don't have water in your engine oil. If you do, you have most likely lost one of the timing chain guides and the chain has worn a hole in the front cover of the engine or the block has cracked. Another possible problem location could be the water pump leaking at the forward seal.

Jun 18, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

Hello, got a car question for you fine people. My friend had a timing chain that broke on his car at 50,000 miles. Kinda early for something like that I would think. What would cause a timing chain to go...


50K miles IS premature for a chain to break. They're pretty tough. Are you sure it's a chain? If it is a BELT, it could be old and broke due to age. They are a synthetic rubber and eventually they deteriorate over time.

You don't specifically state what kind of car your friend has, so I am presuming a 1998 Accord. That car should have a belt.

Either a belt or a chain can fail prematurely if the tensioning system fails. This will allow excessive slack in the chain or belt which will cause damage to the affected drive components. The tensioning systems can fail due to one or more of the following:

Lack of oil pressure, failed tensioning springs, failed pulley bearings, over-revving the engine for ridiculous periods of time, and failed plastic guide components.

Belts can also fail due to chemical contamination (oil or antifreeze leaking on the belt).

Finally - the water pump can fail which will derail the belt as the belt drives the water pump on many Honda 4 cylinder engines.


Feb 19, 2010 | 1998 Honda Accord

2 Answers

When to replace timing chain on 2003 Camry V6?


Replace the timing belt at 90,000 miles.

It will not damage the motor (bend the valves) if it breaks or jumps time

Finally, if you do change the belt, make sure that the water pump is inspected very close for any evidence of coolant seepage at the impeller shaft weep hole. If there is ANY evidence of wetness or leakage, replace the pump then. Easier to change the pump when the belt is off, than to have to do the whole job if the leak gets worse, and, if it leaks down the road, coolant on the timing belt will damage the belt, and you will have to buy a new belt, too. Change the plugs at 90 K miles, too.

Sep 16, 2008 | 2003 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

Timing chain cover leak need a diagram of parts and bolts


Did you check the cam seal? can be replace by taking your fan and radiator and cover off. you will see oil around it if it's start leaking, when you replace timing belt is the best time to replace it as well.

Aug 11, 2008 | 1991 Toyota Pickup

Not finding what you are looking for?
2000 Chevrolet Blazer Logo

40 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Chevrolet Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

75822 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22156 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

8202 Answers

Are you a Chevrolet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...