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Dual climate control one side works

My edge is equipped with dual climate control, however with the ac set all the way on cold, only the passenger side blows cold. The drivers side blows really hot air. What are some trouble shooting tips and solutions to this problem?

Posted by Anonymous on

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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vmhreha
  • 77 Answers

SOURCE: air condition/heater

sounds like the air-conditioning expansion valve is probably not working correctly here is a way you can fix your air conditioning:

  1. Realize that auto AC is basically a refrigerator in a weird layout. It's designed to move heat from one place (the inside of your car) to some other place (the outdoors). While a complete discussion of every specific model and component is well outside the scope of this article, this should give you a start on figuring out what the problem might be and either fixing it yourself or talking intelligently to someone you can pay to fix it.
  1. Become familiar with the major components to auto air conditioning:

  2. the compressor, which compresses and circulates the refrigerant in the system
  • the refrigerant, (on modern cars, usually a substance called R-134a older cars have r-12 freon which is becoming increasingly more expensive and hard to find, and also requires a license to handle) which carries the heat
  • the condenser, which changes the phase of the refrigerant and expels heat removed from the car
  • the expansion valve (or orifice tube in some vehicles), which is somewhat of a nozzle and functions to similtaneously drop the pressure of the refrigerant liquid, meter its flow, and atomize it
  • the evaporator, which transfers heat to the refrigerant from the air blown across it, cooling your car
  • the receiver/dryer, which functions as a filter for the refrigerant/oil, removing moisture and other contaminants
  1. Understand the air conditioning process: The compressor puts the refrigerant under pressure and sends it to the condensing coils. In your car, these coils are generally in front of the radiator. Compressing a gas makes it quite hot. In the condenser, this added heat and the heat the refrigerant picked up in the evaporator is expelled to the air flowing across it from outside the car. When the refrigerant is cooled to its saturation temperature, it will change phase from a gas back into a liquid (this gives off a bundle of heat known as the "latent heat of vaporization"). The liquid then passes through the expansion valve to the evaporator, the coils inside of your car, where it loses pressure that was added to it in the compressor. This causes some of the liquid to change to a low-pressure gas as it cools the remaining liquid. This two-phase mixture enters the evaporator, and the liquid portion of the refrigerant absorbs the heat from the air across the coil and evaporates. Your car's blower circulates air across the cold evaporator and into the interior. The refrigerant goes back through the cycle again and again.
  2. Check to see if all the R-134a leaks out (meaning there's nothing in the loop to carry away heat). Leaks are easy to spot but not easy to fix without pulling things apart. Most auto-supply stores carry a fluorescent dye that can be added to the system to check for leaks, and it will have instructions for use on the can. If there's a bad enough leak, the system will have no pressure in it at all. Find one of the valve-stem-looking things and CAREFULLY (eye protection recommended) poke a pen in there to try to valve off pressure, and if there IS none, that's the problem.
  3. Make sure the compressor is turning. Start the car, turn on the AC and look under the hood. The AC compressor is generally a pumplike thing off to one side with large rubber and steel hoses going to it. It will not have a filler cap on it, but will often have one or two things that look like the valve stems on a bike tire. The pulley on the front of the compressor exists as an outer pulley and an inner hub which turns when an electric clutch is engaged. If the AC is on and the blower is on, but the center of the pulley is not turning, then the compressor's clutch is not engaging. This could be a bad fuse, a wiring problem, a broken AC switch in your dash, or the system could be low on refrigerant (most systems have a low-pressure safety cutout that will disable the compressor if there isn't enough refrigerant in the system).
  4. Look for other things that can go wrong: bad switches, bad fuses, broken wires, broken fan belt (preventing the pump from turning), or seal failure inside the compressor.
  5. Feel for any cooling at all. If the system cools, but not much, it could just be low pressure, and you can top up the refrigerant. Most auto-supply stores will have a kit to refill a system, and it will come with instructions. Do not overfill! Adding more than the recommended amount of refrigerant will NOT improve performance but actually will decrease performance. In fact, the more expensive automated equipment found at nicer shops actually monitors cooling performance real-time as it adds refrigerant, and when the performance begins to decrease it removes refrigerant until the performance peaks again.

Posted on Jun 05, 2008

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  • 12 Answers

SOURCE: climate control

try putting the selector in a desired position with the key on then turn off the key and disconnect the battery for 10min.

Posted on Jun 15, 2008

harley9701ha
  • 424 Answers

SOURCE: Temperature Control not working on 1999 Ford Explorer

Sounds like your temperature actuator is not moving or your temp door is broken. On max a-c ,coolant is shut off to your heater core allowing only cold air in.

Posted on Jan 26, 2009

  • 15 Answers

SOURCE: ford ka heater blows hot air all the time

Your problem is a faulty heater control valve. The design used on these vehicles allows for hot water to flow constantly and compete with the evaporator as there is no blender door. You have to replace the valve and possibly the control head. Meanwhile, you can bypass the valve to have cold air

Posted on Sep 12, 2009

duane_wong
  • 6826 Answers

SOURCE: When I turn the heat

The blend door is not working right or the in car air temperature sensor is faulty.
Removal & Installation Air Inlet Door Vacuum Motor To Remove:

  1. Remove the instrument panel.
  2. Remove the air inlet door motor mounting screws. CAUTION
    Do not attempt to bend any part of the air inlet duct door lever.
  3. Rotate and remove the air inlet door vacuum control motor.
To Install:
  1. Rotate and install the air inlet door vacuum control motor.
  2. Install and tighten the mounting screws.
  3. Install the instrument panel.
Defroster Door Vacuum Motor To Remove:
  1. Remove the passenger air bag module from the instrument panel.
  2. Disconnect the vacuum line and remove the mounting screws. CAUTION
    Do not attempt to bend any part of the defroster airflow mode door lever.
  3. Rotate and remove the vacuum control motor from the defrost door lever.
To Install:
  1. Rotate and install the vacuum control motor on the defrost door lever.
  2. Install and tighten the mounting screws.
  3. Connect the vacuum line to the vacuum control motor.
  4. Install the passenger's air bag module.
Floor Console Register Duct Vacuum Motor To Remove:
  1. Remove the floor console.
  2. Remove the right-side instrument panel insulator.
  3. Working from the passenger's footwell, disconnect the vacuum hose.
  4. Remove the screws and the floor console register duct vacuum control motor. CAUTION
    Do not attempt to bend any part of the floor console register duct door lever.
  5. Rotate and remove the vacuum control motor from the floor console register duct door.
To Install:
  1. Rotate and install the vacuum control motor on the floor console register duct door.
  2. Install and tighten the mounting screws.
  3. Connect the vacuum hose to the floor console register duct vacuum control motor.
  4. Install the insulator under the dash.
  5. Install the floor console.
Panel/Floor Door Vacuum Motor To Remove:
  1. Working through the driver footwell, remove the two screws and the shield. CAUTION
    Do not attempt to bend any part of the airflow mode door lever.
  2. Label and disconnect the two vacuum hoses.
  3. Remove the mounting screw.
  4. Lift, rotate and remove the panel/floor door vacuum control motor from the door lever.
To Install:
  1. Install the panel/floor door vacuum control motor on the door lever.
  2. Install and tighten the mounting screw.
  3. Connect the vacuum hoses in their original positions.
  4. Install the shield on the vacuum motor.
Auxiliary Air Distribution Blend Door Actuator To Remove:
  1. Remove the right rear quarter trim panel access panel. Auxiliary climate control housing removal and installation ford-10-00-4589.gif

  2. Remove the auxiliary air distribution blend door actuator screws.
  3. Disconnect the auxiliary air distribution blend door actuator connector.
To Install:
  1. Connect the auxiliary air distribution blend door actuator connector.
  2. Install the auxiliary air distribution blend door actuator screws.
  3. Install the right rear quarter trim panel access panel.
Auxiliary Temperature Blend Door Actuator To Remove:
  1. Remove the right rear quarter trim panel. Auxiliary climate control housing removal and installation ford-10-00-4589.gif

  2. Disconnect the temperature auxiliary temperature blend door actuator connector.
  3. Remove the temperature auxiliary temperature blend door actuator screws.
  4. Remove the temperature auxiliary temperature blend door actuator.
To Install:
  1. Install the temperature auxiliary temperature blend door actuator.
  2. Install the temperature auxiliary temperature blend door actuator screws.
  3. Connect the temperature auxiliary temperature blend door actuator connector.
  4. Install the right rear quarter trim panel.
--- In-Car Temperature Sensor Removal & Installation To Remove:
  1. Remove the instrument cluster finish panel.
  2. Disconnect the in-vehicle temperature sensor connector.
  3. Disconnect the in-vehicle temperature sensor aspirator tube.
  4. Remove the in-vehicle temperature sensor screws.
  5. Remove the in-vehicle temperature sensor.
To Install:
  1. Install the in-vehicle temperature sensor.
  2. Install the in-vehicle temperature sensor screws.
  3. Connect the in-vehicle temperature sensor aspirator tube.
  4. Connect the in-vehicle temperature sensor connector.
  5. Install the instrument cluster finish panel.
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Posted on Oct 07, 2010

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1 Answer

Why does 1 side of dash blow hot and the other cold when ac is on with the dual climate control?


Check the actuator motor on the heater it directs the air into the vents. There is probably two of them be sure to check both. The motor makes the vents move and again directs the air where you want. Hope this helps.

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this is also worth considering:

Dual Climate System. If you're not familiar with this setup, there's a driver and passenger climate setting. The passenger setting knob is on the right of the climate control console. If you have already properly adjusted this setting, there's a problem with the servo motor being out of the preset range for the a/c & heater doors. Every time power is cut from the unit, the servo resets the doors by doing a "sweep" from full cold to full hot maximum range. Over time the servo will fall out of range from constant full range flexing, and the part that controls the range limit must be replaced. Reseting the main module by disconnecting the battery has a slim chance of successfully fixing the issue.

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