Question about 1979 Toyota Corolla

Open Question

Breaker Ignition point gap

I am searching for the gap distance in the breaker ignition points inside the distributor

Posted by Anonymous on

Ad

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
A 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
The service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad
chris bean
  • 61 Answers

SOURCE: replace old points distributor with a electronic

this is easy if you can find parts meant for it. Need a distributor, a crank sensor and pulley with a reference point for the sensor, a control module, coil, cap, rotor, wires, and you should be good to go.the CKP (crank sensor) tells the module when to fire, the module fires the coil, and the distributor determines basically when it fires in terms of milliseconds (basic timing), same as with points. The timing via distributor is necessary since the fuel is not controlled via CMP (cam sensor). otherwise the distributor would be fixed and the computer would control fuel volume/timing and ignition timing at the same time, and since there is no reference for the fuel or valve timing, the module has no way to determine the most effective timing therefore simply fires when the crank passes the sensor.

Posted on Mar 29, 2010

Ad
csmock132
  • 4669 Answers

SOURCE: 2.0 EFI. No ignition. Replaced the distributor w/

Is the distributor turning when you crank it? From a broken timing belt.

Posted on Aug 02, 2010

  • 14036 Answers

SOURCE: ignition points gap setting for '86 land cruiser

WELL 1986 IGNITION SYSTEM ELECTRONIC THE WAS NO POINTS USED. LAST SET OF POINTS IN TOYOTA WAS 1979 TO 1980 POINTS GAP SETTING WOULD HAVE BEEN 0.018

Posted on Dec 07, 2010

czaa
  • 4758 Answers

SOURCE: ignition points gap setting for

your local library has repair manuals or go online--some dealer techs may look it up for you--aproximating the gap can be done-just dont make it too wide or close

Posted on Dec 07, 2010

  • 111 Answers

SOURCE: what is the feeler gauage

.45mm or 18 thou . Set them when the rubbing block of the points are on the highest part of the lobe. Reset the ignition timing after setting the points as points setting changes the timing. Use a strobe light or if you dont have one you can do it statically . Put the engine on its timing mark on the front pulley not tdc. loosen the distributor turn the ignition on and slowly rotate the dissy until you hear the small tic of the points opening and the spark jumping. at this point re tighten the dissy. That should do the trick If this helps Please Vote Jeff

Posted on Mar 13, 2011

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I have a 1993 ford Econovan maxi . I have ignition point . What is the gap on the ignition point . Thanks


point gap is .40 to .50 mm ( point 4 to point 5 mm) or .015 to .20"
most point distributors are at the .02 " mark but check and adjust as points to wide will misfire under load or lack power if too close
point gap variations can change ignition timing

Nov 20, 2016 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Is their naybe and other distributor that i can modfy to fit on a 1199cc uno engin


You don't have enough information. What model is the car, does it have a point breaker ignition or is it electronic. Why do you want to modify the distributor?
There are electronic ignition kits available to fit to your existing points breaker ignition, so no need to fit another distributor.

Nov 21, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 1957 Ford 292 engine and it is misfiring on cylinders 4 and 8. What could be the problem?


I had a 312 cid in my 1956 Ford. There are several possibilities and in the firing order, cylinders 4 and 8 are next to each other in Counter Clockwise firing order.
There is a ridge on the cap which matches a slot on the distributor and allows the 2 parts to interlock and mesh. Any other rotation of the cap will tip the cap off center and increase the firing gap on the high side while possibly causing the opposing terminals to scrape.
Wear in breaker plate bushing or distributor shaft bushing. Easily determined if you can find a real old-time speed shop with a Distributor curve machine. What happens is torque shifts the spinning distributor shaft to the side of the bushing with excess play. Basically same thing happens with a worn breaker plate; movement causes misalignment of breaker plate and points lose gap when breaker cam tries to lift points.
If removed you can fiddle with distributor shaft and put points on "High-cam" for each cylinder and measure point gap. Logically, if perfect, each "High Cam" has the same gap. But wear will show up if you put pressure either on the breaker plate or the distributor shaft.
There is a spring pin holding the distributor gear onto the shaft. You may find a seal on the shaft at some point. The parts were lubed by the oil "sling" onto the distributor housing, You may be able to "180" the distributor drive gear so mark it relative to the distributor shaft.
Other than the above, I do not know if an 8mm wire would fit into the Distributor cap; the older wires were 7mm 0r thinner and sometimes spark would jump if the wires crossed.
Finally, and much more expensive would be worn rear Camshaft bushings. 4 and 8, I believe were opposed and wobble could account for non electrical misfiring.
I hope my info has helped you. Would be interested in what you found.

Aug 02, 2013 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine randomly cut out while driving or idiling,,, sometimes starts right back up other times takes a couple minutes... Cause?????


Hi Steven, I would think of replacing the the points (contact breaker) and condenser (capacitor) Theses are inside the distributor and revealed by removing the distributor cap. Remove the holding clips or screws (I don't remember which) and then lift off the cap and rotor arm. remove the cables connecting to the condenser and points. Remove both points and condenser and replace both and reconnect the electrical cables. Turn the engine by hand until the contact breaker is fully opened by one of the cam lobes on the center shaft and then adjust the gap to point four five millimeters. Rotate the engine again by hand until the points close and then with the ignition turned on but not cranking check you have spark by opening the points with a plastic tool. Once the spark is confirmed turn the engine to the timing marks (Please confirm ignition timing but I believe it is 6 degrees before Top Dead Center. Turn the engine so that the timing marks align at that setting and then set the points by loosening off the distributor body and rotating it so that the points are just about to open but are still closed. Tighten everything up and refit the rotor arm and cap and start the engine. For a more accurate setting of the distributor timing use a strobe timing light after initial start up. Always attend to the ignition timing before attempting any carburetor adjustment. Regards John

Apr 23, 2012 | 1984 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

I am seeking the points setting/gap for a 1962 auston 6 cyl 4ltr 2.45ton truck hope you can help thanks gary.


If it still has a breaker point ignition system then gap the spark plugs at .032 inch, or .81 mm, and if the distributor has been converted over to an electronic ignition system then gap the spark plugs at .040 inch, or 1.0 mm.

Sep 25, 2010 | Aston Martin DB7 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I changed plugs on my 455 olds an when i gap them at .035 it starts but if i gap them at .045 it wont hit at all?


What year is the vehicle and engine, and is the ignition system an electronic HEI (High Energy Ignition) distributor, or the old style breaker points ignition distributor.

Sep 13, 2010 | 1992 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera

1 Answer

Settings for points for 454 engine86 chev c30 scotsdale one ton truck


You have a 1986 454 engine with an old style breaker point ignition distributor, GM has not used a breaker point ignition for their V-8 engines since 1974, is that an older distributor or something after-market?

The ignition points dwell angle for that engine should be set at 29-31 degrees dwell (a dwell meter would be the most accurate way to set the ignition points), or a .019 in. point gap.

The spark plug gap for that engine would be .035 in. and the timing should be set at 10 degrees before top dead center.

Jun 29, 2010 | 1986 Chevrolet Chevy

2 Answers

How to determine if a condenser is still functional.


The ignition condenser is needed for good coil saturation and is directly related to the voltage output of the coil, the weaker the ignition condenser is, the weaker the spark will be from the coil.

The signs to look for when replacing the ignition points are burnt or pitted contact surfaces at the breakers, and for a worn down rubbing block. (where the points contact the cam lobes inside the distributor)

The only things that you can do to prolong the life of the ignition points is to make sure that the rubbing block on the ignition points and the distributor cam lobes are properly lubricated with die-electric grease, and make sure that the dwell angle is properly set. (you would need a dwell meter to set the ignition points properly)

The only reason that the engine would stall from the ignition points is because either the condenser burned out, or the rubbing block wore down and the ignition points closed up. (The ignition points should open and close to provide a primary signal to the coil, if they do close up, you can get home by using a piece of a match book cover to set the gap for the ignition points, it is approximate enough to work well enough to get you back home if stranded from closed up ignition points)

I hope that this was helpful to you in any way.

Apr 27, 2010 | Isuzu Pickup Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1966 ford f100 inline 6 cyl 300\r\engine turns


Make sure that the primary wire between the distributor ignition points and ignition coil is not damaged anywhere and grounding the circuit out. This is not a ground wire.

Replace the ignition points condenser, if this is shorted your points will never be able to work. With the condenser removed, use an ohm meter to check the resistance between the end of the condenser wire and the condenser caseing, there should be infinite resistance or an open loop, but it should not show any kind of a connection between the two, or it is grounded or "shorted to ground" and it will prevent the ignition system from working.

Are the ignition points adjusted properly? They have to open and close to send a dwell signal to the coil.

Connect a test light to ground and on the NEG. (-) side of the coil, have someone crank the engine and look for the test light to flash, the test light should flash indicating a dwell signal or coil pulse. (Do not use the POS. + side of the coil for this test, because you will not get a dwell signal).

If no dwell signal, then...

1. Turn off ignition and remove the distributor cap and turn the engine over until a high spot on the distributor cam lobe is on the rubbing block on the ignition points.

This is the fully open position for the ignition points and where they need to be to set them. and if you do not know the feeler gauge size, or the dwell angle to set your points at (according to manufacturers specifications), then tear off a piece of a match book and place it between the two point breakers.

2. Loosen the point hold down adjusting screw and move the base of the points with a screwdriver (look for adjusting nothches), until there is a light drag felt pulling on the match book. For the newer GM's up to 1974, just use a 1/8 allen wrench to obtain the same light drag on the match book.

3. Remove the matchbook and there should still be a small gap between the point breakers, rotate the engine and you should see the points open and fully close.

4. Pull the coil wire out of the distributor cap and ground the end of the coil wire well or you might get shocked.

5. Have someone crank the engine and re-check for a dwell signal, you should also see a blue-white spark flashing between the point breakers as they open and close.

If you now have a dwell signal then replace the distributor cap back onto the distributor and the the coil wire back onto the distributor cap, the engine should now start.

If you did not grease the rubbing block of the ignition points with die-electric grease when you installed them, then the rubbing block on the points will wear down prematurely, the points will close down, and the engine will no longer start.

If you crank your engine over and the ignition rotor turns clockwise (looking down at the rotor) then you need to put the die-electric grease along the right side of the rubbing block edge (looking down at the points) so that the grease is trapped between the points and the distributor cam lobe, and the distributor cam lobe can pick up the grease. (Grease the left side of the rubbing block edge if the ignition rotor turns counter-clockwise). Only use die-electric grease.

Apr 19, 2010 | 1981 Ford F 100

Not finding what you are looking for?
1979 Toyota Corolla Logo

Related Topics:

22 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Toyota Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

78289 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22326 Answers

Jeffrey Turcotte
Jeffrey Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

8836 Answers

Are you a Toyota Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...