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Need help For f250 3/4 ton 4x4 Ignition system has power but will not produce spark have replaced distributor coil ignition module any suggestions

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 40,786 Answers

Check for power from the ignition switch to the coil as the coil may not be getting power

Posted on Apr 22, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

alicantecoli
  • 22095 Answers

SOURCE: 1985 Dodge W-150 4x4 5.9

got to be ignition module ,check for feed to it and if you have a feed then check the earths and if ok just change it ,these thing can just stop when you turn engine off ,never seen one go whilst being driven .

Posted on Dec 14, 2008

  • 255 Answers

SOURCE: no spark but turns over replaced ignition module,coil,ecm

could be in the crank position sensor

just a thought shack

Posted on Apr 18, 2009

  • 65 Answers

SOURCE: No spark?

Hi, common thing with the mazda was the coil or the ignition amplifier going faulty, both of which are located within the distributor, the coil ususally gives the symptoms you describe, a weak spark. The coil is the most common failure aswell for your vehicle i would recommend a new one, also make sure distributor is spinning as it could just be a case of a broken timing belt.

Good luck Davelee

Posted on Apr 29, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 1990 FORD F 150,SPARK ON THE COIL BUT NO FROM THE DISTRIBUTOR

i had the same problem. there is a group of wires that go by the distributer and branch off to the distributer and go towards the front. when i would jiggle it the van would die. it ended up being a pinched wire.

Posted on Aug 07, 2009

nvannoy
  • 234 Answers

SOURCE: 1993 toyota corolla, problem no spark to spark

Check the ignition relay and all the main relays on the battery.

Posted on Jan 06, 2010

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Starts fine one time and then refuses to start.


If this is a conversion from old points style to HEI modern style, the problem may be the resistance wire is still in the circuit, which should have been removed from the power circuit to the distributor.
If the ignition coil reads 12 volts to its 12 volts terminal, then you should replace the ignition module, furthermore, a pickup coil and sprocket can also be replaced from under the rotor but the distributor needs to be removed and disassembled to get to the pickup coil and sprocket. Some Fords don't need to be removed but do need some disassembling to replace all of its electrical components.

Apr 27, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2000 gmc Sierra 3/4 ton 4x4 k series I have no spark to my spark plugs I have changed the crank sensor an the ignition module not sure what else I can try I'm thinking maybe the ignition coil


Check to see if you are getting spark from the coil to the distributor. I suppose the engine is a 5.7 liter?If not getting spark to the cap, then check for power and ground pulse at the coil.If there is spark at the cap, replace the ignition rotor. If there is no power or ground pulse at the coil,check to see if the ignition rotor is spinning when the starter is engaged. If the distributor is not spinning while cranking the engine there are several more things you'll need to check,i.e.,distributor gear and pin as well as oil pump if the pin or gear are damaged.

Mar 05, 2015 | GMC Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

Why does 99 honda cive ex have no ignition spark?


There is no definitive test for it the ICM, or igniter. If you are positive that the coil is good and it has power at the black/yellow wire, confirm that it is hot at the igniter. Make sure all 4 connecters on the igniter are tight, they should not pull off easily. With the cap off, you should check for spark directly from the coil to ground. Rotors fail too. If everything checks out, and still no spark, the next step is replacing the igniter. Check prices at Honda, sometimes they are the same or cheaper than aftermarket.

Nov 02, 2014 | 1999 Honda Civic

2 Answers

Have fire going to ignition coil but will not come out into distributer


There is no fire involved, except in the engine cylinders
is there!

Use the internet

Google-- how to test your specific ford motors ignition
system

There is lots there to help you,IF you have the skills
needed to use a volt meter

Jul 16, 2014 | 1986 Mercury Grand Marquis

1 Answer

2005 grand am wont start


see this steps and fix it. God bless you
When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and compression. Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or cranshaft position sensor CKP

A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit.
Module problems as well as pickup problems are often caused by loose, broken or corroded wiring terminals and connectors. Older GM HEI ignition modules are notorious for this. If you are working on a distributorless ignition system with a Hall effect crankshaft position sensor, check the sensor's reference voltage (VRef) and ground. The sensor must have 5 volts or it will remain permanently off and not generate a crank signal (which should set a fault code). Measure VRef between the sensor power supply wire and ground (use the engine block for a ground, not the sensor ground circuit wire). Don't see 5 volts? Then check the sensor wiring harness for loose or corroded connectors. A poor ground connection will have the same effect on the sensor operation as a bad VRef supply. Measure the voltage drop between the sensor ground wire and the engine block. More than a 0.1 voltage drop indicates a bad ground connection. Check the sensor mounting and wiring harness.
If a Hall effect crank sensor has power and ground, the next thing to check would be its output. With nothing in the sensor window, the sensor should be "on" and read 5 volts (VRef). Measure the sensor D.C. output voltage between the sensor signal output wire and ground (use the engine block again, not the ground wire). When the engine is cranked, the sensor output should drop to zero every time the shutter blade, notch, magnetic button or gear tooth passes through the sensor. No change in voltage would indicate a bad sensor that needs to be replaced.
If the primary side of the ignition system seems to be producing a trigger signal for the coil but the voltage is not reaching the plugs, a visual inspection of the coil tower, distributor cap, rotor and plug wires should be made to identify any defects that might be preventing the spark from reaching its intended destination.


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Oct 16, 2012 | 2005 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

Have a 1993 f150 4x4 5.0 / 302 new coil new ignition module new distributer cap/ rotor wires and plugs not getting fire from the coil??? please help


Check pickup ring inside the distributor sounds like the wire is broken and make sure you have power going to ignition module. If you don't go to library and use their all-data services for test procedures for no spark condition. If you have power to ignition module i would say its the pick up coil in distributor. This system is a pretty reliable one. I have seen new modules that where bad so you might have yours tested by your local parts store most of them will test them for free or a small charge.
Good luck I hope this helps get you back running agian

Jul 03, 2011 | 1991 Ford F150

2 Answers

No spark from spark plug wires I think it may be the distributor cap or interior parts under cap like rotor and condensor but dont want to change parts thats are fine i replaced the plugs but still no...


There wrere two types of HEI (High Energy Ignition) distributors used by GM in 1985, one was the original design with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap, and the second had the coil mounted seperate from the distributor and used a coil wire.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also if the coil is seperate from the distributor that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


GM HEI Ignition Coil (Mounted In Distributor Cap Type)
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Jul 30, 2010 | 1985 Chevrolet Chevy

2 Answers

My car has power goin to the coil but not to the distributor. Why?


Im not sure what engine you have or what ignition system is in it but the coil has power and the other wire is ground, the dist is what produces the ground as it spins in order to make the coil spark, the dist grounds and releases ground very fast. if your dist has a control module on it or on the fender well then the module should have power to it. if your problem is a no spark one then have the control module tested and also make sure the cam is spining and the timing belt didnt pop if this is a 4cylinder, no matter what motor have the module tested and try another coil if module tests good.

Jul 03, 2010 | 1991 Ford Mustang

2 Answers

94 toyota camery no spark


I had the same problem recently but replacing the ignition Coil under the distributor (inside) solved the problem. Also replaced the distributor Cap and rotor at the same time.

Jul 18, 2008 | 1994 Toyota Camry

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