Question about 2003 Honda Pilot

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My 2004 Honda Pilot tilts to left and right on 60MPH. I have changed the stabilizer linkage, shock, bushings infact all components on the front wheel but problem still persist. I really dont know wh

After changing everything in front, could it be arear wheel problem?

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  • Honda Master
  • 808 Answers

The tires could be out of round causing this problem suggest lifting and supporting car run at idle view tires to see if they are not round and also view thread if they may have a lose belt causing the car to shift .

Posted on Apr 20, 2014

Testimonial: "I already bought new tires and problem persists. I also observed that...turning my power steering on a spot proves difficult but when in motion, the steering feels very free. (Power steering oil is always guaged and it is always at the normal level as indicated on the oil compartment in the engine.) Could this also be associated with the problem?"

  • Dan Jacobs
    Dan Jacobs Apr 22, 2014

    This issue it strange I had a 1999 CRV with no trouble for 265k the power steering i would think it would be stiff as you turned the wheel from lock to lock position sitting still if roughness there it would be the steering shaft joints. how does the car act going over speed bumps in parking lots does ot seem to bounce up and down this could be weak springs .

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6 Suggested Answers

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  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

bestdarngood
  • 3037 Answers

SOURCE: 2000 honda civic manual transmission

I would have to see the car if you would need all of these, most likely you could do the flushes yourself if they are needed. Take the car to another shop and see what they recommend changing and at what price. Everything depends on actually seeing the car and whether the above have been done before. The prices aren't out of question.

Posted on Jun 23, 2008

  • 255 Answers

SOURCE: 98 chevy cavalier (humming sound)

ck pwr str fluid for low level no 2 sounds like wear detector on brake pads. tire wheel off ck pads see it wear indicator is in contact with rotor

hope2help shack

Posted on Apr 17, 2009

bigc73542
  • 108 Answers

SOURCE: wheel vibrations at 75+ mph

Most computer controlled tire balancing machines which are in use today only balance tires to between 65/70 miles an hour. To get them balanced to a higher speed you might want to call a few auto performance shops and see if they balance tires to a higher speed. At higher speeds it takes very little in the way of an off balanced tire to really set up a vibration so shake.

bigc

Posted on Jun 28, 2009

turo1000
  • 18 Answers

SOURCE: 2006 Honda Pilot - Road Noise - not tires.

the tires make steady noise , check the wheel bearing as noises get high and low at the same speed , and i also would check for diff if it's 4wd.

Posted on Jul 25, 2009

  • 4336 Answers

SOURCE: My 2001 Honda shimmies at low speed too

my vote is ply spliting. Look for out of true tire at the tread as sighted across the tread with the tire rotating..... Raise car, put on safe jack stands, and roll the tire. The trick is to observe the tread...Look across the tread to a reference point on the other side. the tire should rotate and be true.

When plies split, there is an uneven or high spot during the above test.

The drift is commonly caused by insistance to cross rotate tires, just not a good idea as pulling often occurs and then cannot be stopped.

I am an admitted addict, but put on Michelin tires and you will be totally happy. The price is seriously more than worth it. Those tires work.

Posted on Sep 21, 2009

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General Description
The front suspension allows each wheel to compensate for changes in the road surface without affecting the opposite wheel. Each wheel independently connects to the frame with a steering knuckle, ball joint assemblies, and upper and lower control arms.
The control arms specifically allow the steering knuckles to move in a three-dimensional arc. Two tie rods connect to steering arms on the knuckles and an intermediate rod. These operate the front wheels.
The two-wheel drive vehicles have coil chassis springs. These springs are mounted between the spring housings on the frame and the lower control arms. Double, direct acting shock absorbers are inside the coil springs. The coil springs attach to the lower control arms and offer ride control.
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A spring stabilizer shaft controls the side roll of the front suspension. This shaft is mounted in rubber bushings that are held by brackets to the frame side rails. The ends of the stabilizer shaft connect to the lower control arms with link bolts. Rubber grommets isolate these link bolts. Rubber bushings attach the upper control arm to a cross shaft. Frame brackets bolt the cross shaft.
A ball joint assembly is riveted to the outer end of the upper control arm. A rubber spring in the control arm assures that the ball seats properly in the socket. A castellated nut and a cotter pin join the steering knuckle to the upper ball joint.
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That is a picture of a Porsche sway bar, but the idea is the same. Make sure all bolts are tight and that one end is not missing the linkage that connects it to the spring/strut. The grinding of the brakes may be the sound of the linkage piece touching the rotor. Sway bar is a logical solution to both issues.

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