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Dodge daytona white exhaust smoke

Excessive white smoke from exhaust replaced head gasket and did not help

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You need check the valve stem seals on the cylinder head

Posted on Apr 17, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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2 Answers

My car has white smoke coming from the exhaust


he causes of white exhaust smoke can vary; however, it is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke.
One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located.

Nov 17, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 1998 Mazda millenia Is shorting white smoke more tell pipe what could be the problem


It is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke. One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located. THESE LEAKS WILL CAUSE SEVERE ENGINE DAMAGE! Have the car inspected immediately.

I
Internal coolant leaks can and will cause

Jul 30, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

White exhaust smoke


pull the spark plugs and see which cylinder is burning coolant. sounds like a bad head gasket.

Apr 17, 2014 | 2004 Dodge Stratus

1 Answer

Milky oil dipstick, white exhaust smoke, coolant in spark plugs


*White milky oil on dipstick = coolant in oil.
*Coolant on sparkplugs = cracked head or blown head gasket
*White smoke = burning excessive oil in the cylinders, which can be caused by a number of things including valve seals, cracked head or blown head gasket.
***All three of these symptoms together, however, means its the head or head gasket. Both are costly but better the head gasket than the entire head.

Jan 18, 2012 | 2002 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

My 2008 dodge grand caravan oil looks like lowfat light chocolate milk?


with 15 years experince as a mechanic it sounds to me that you have a blown head gasket that would result in antifreeze leaking into the oil system. which will cause what they call the choclate milkshake. the funny exhaust smell and white colored smoke is caused from the head gasket leaking coolant into the combustion chamber and when coolant gets into the combustion chamber it burns the coolant and forms a white smoke out of the exhaust that will have a sweet smell. replacing the head gasket and having the cylinder head checked at a machine shop will solve your problem. if you remove the spark plugs one at a time you will probally find one that is wet with a unusual color or may even find two spark plugs that way indicating head gasket blown between two cylinders which is most likely your problem. if not fixed soon driving will cause crankshaft bearing damage which results in engine lock up or crankshaft parts like a piston rod to start to knock or fly apart ruining your engine. i hope this helps you

Dec 11, 2011 | 1998 Dodge Grand Caravan

1 Answer

Excess smoke


The general rule: white-ish smoke indicates coolant in the exhaust, meaning a blown head gasket, whereas darker smoke indicates motor oil in the exhaust, which means that one (or more) cylinders have a broken ring, and the engine needs a ring job.
Fix for white smoke: replace head gasket.
Fix for black smoke: ring job.

Oct 05, 2011 | 2003 Lexus ES 300

2 Answers

1989 chrysler daytona started running rough and blew white smoke from rear and hood sweet burnt smell of anti freeze. thinking I blew a cylinder head again... is this a common problem to fix every 3 yrs


yes especially if you keep using the same head and are not getting it shaved or getting a reman head they are dirt cheap , also check on aftermarket head gasket from mr.gasket like a copper or blumax

Jul 12, 2010 | 1989 Dodge Daytona

1 Answer

White smoke from Exhaust


hardly likely the exhaust job would cause that, but yes it sounds like you got a blown head gasket. badl lock stricks hmm! also preasure test cylinder head for leaks

Jul 22, 2009 | 2005 Renault R5

2 Answers

89 daytona foamy oil... white smoke...???


The information you gave gives the impression that the head gasket has gone bad and the engine needs to be rebuilt. You can just replace the head gasket, but that's just a quick fix for now. The antifreeze mixed with the engine oil is bad, Antifreeze is very corrosive to the main crank shaft bearing and most likely need to be addressed. At this point might as well go through the whole engine since it's apart. Sorry for the bad news friend. 

Jul 14, 2009 | 1989 Dodge Daytona

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