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Service brake master cylinder - 1982 Alfa Romeo Spider

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02 Ford Explorer sporttrac xlt. New rotors calipers pads and master cylinder. Bled it twice stream looks good new fluid. One day breaks stick then the next no breaks Break light on Proportional valve?


For some reason these vehicles you need to bleed brakes several times, had same problem, so air hangs up in lines somewhere it apears. When you say brakes sticks, describe it better, locked up, or dragging on rotors?
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Apr 21, 2015 | 2002 Ford Explorer Sport Trac

1 Answer

Hello i have a big problem of brakes for a silverado 1500 year 97 4x4. no brake pedals the pedal go down to the floor .i have to change master cylinder and to bleed the block ABS and then the 4 wheels and...


Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder. If it's low or empty refill it and check for a leak. If the master cylinder is full of fluid the cylinder itself could be bad.

Jun 19, 2011 | Chevrolet 1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What is the name of the part attached on the right of the master cylinder on a 1994 buick century it has 4 brake lines and 2 sets of wires plugged into it. Also i need to know how to replace it


How do you know if you need a new master cylinder? Most of the time, if a brake component needs replacing, it leaves a trail to follow. This trail is made of stinky brake fluid. That's the good news. Following a trail of brake fluid will usually lead you to a current or future brake problem. There are lots of brake components that can go bad. You've got wheel cylinders, master cylinders, discs, boosters, ABS systems and even brake pads. Any of these things can make your brakes more exciting than you ever hoped. Excitement is not something we want out of our brakes.
  • Open end or box wrenches
  • Line or flare wrenches
  • Screwdrivers
  • Small pry bar or throwaway screwdriver
  • Turkey baster
  • New or Rebuilt master cylinder
  • Brake cleaner
  • Brake fluid
  • Brake lube
  • Safety glasses!Before you start wrenching on your braking system, you need to thoroughly clean all of the parts involved. The inside of a brake system is very sensitive to dirt and debris. Even the smallest piece can cause wear and malfunction. Spray the master cylinder, brake lines and other components liberally with brake cleaner. Let it soak and do it again. If it's extra gooey in there, you might need to steal your kid's toothbrush to take care of it. No matter how you do it, be sure the area is clean before you even remove the brake fluid cap. Once you've got everything ****-n-span, remove the fluid reservoir cap and **** the old brake fluid out with your turkey baster. Don't worry about getting every drop, you're just making the next steps a little cleaner.
    Note: Brake fluid can severely damage automotive paint, so keep it off the carIf your car has a "low brake fluid" sensor in the fluid reservoir cap or any other wiring (such as ABS) on the master cylinder, unplug them. Now take your flare wrench and loosen all four brake lines at the master cylinder, but don't unscrew them all the way yet! You want to leave them in there just a little bit. You'll see why in the next steps.!With the brake lines loosened but not removed, you can remove the bolts that hold the master cylinder in place. It's usually bolted to a brake booster of some shape or size, but you can look at your new master cylinder to see exactly what you should be removing. With the master cylinder bolts removed, you can lift the master cylinder up slightly (if needed) and remove the four brake lines. We left them screwed in slightly because often you aren't able to pull them all the way out because of shock tower clearance. It's not fun having to rethread all the brake lines just so you can get them out enough to remove.With the master cylinder removed you'll be able to see the rod that pushes the piston in the master cylinder. If it didn't come off with the master cylinder, there will also be a seal around the pushrod. Remove this seal. If your master cylinder came with a new seal you'll be replacing it. If not, clean it up for reuse. It still needs to come out temporarilyNow that you've removed the old master cylinder, you're ready to install the new part. But before you do, it's a good idea to bench bleed the master cylinder. It's much easier to get the air out now than later. It goes in just like it came out, so in the words of service manuals around the world, "installation is the reverse of removal."
    Once the new part is installed, you'll need to add new brake fluid (never try to reuse the old stuff) and bleed the brakes. Now you're ready to go!

Dec 11, 2010 | 1994 Buick Century

5 Answers

Brake pedal is hard but brakes not very effective. booster holds vacuum. replaced booster check valve, no change. dash brake light stays on most of time but sometimes goes out for a while then comes back...


Check the brake fluid first.is it low or no brake fluid at all.is the brake fluid got dried up or leaked out. Sounds like the power brake booster is bad, that is what the master cylinder is bolted too. There is a rubber hose that has a plastic valve in it were it snaps into the booster, Pull that rubber hose out of the booster and off of the engine, Now the end that you took off the engine. You should be able to **** through the line, but not be able to blow through it. If you can then replace the valve, It is a one way valve.
If that is all right then hook hose back up to the engine and start engine, You should hear a major vacuum leak at the valve end, put you finger over the valve and it should stop making noise and engine should smooth out. If it don't the rubber hose must be leaking or the tube on the engine were the hose hooks to is stoped up.
Also check the master cylinder if power booster is replaced. If the brake light is coming and going check the brake light switch. check fig for the internal assembly parts:-- bdea807.gif

To check engine vacuum, connect a vacuum gauge to the supply hose that runs from the intake manifold to the booster. A low reading (below 16 inches) may indicate a hose leak or obstruction, a blockage in the exhaust system (plugged catalytic converter, crushed pipe, bad muffler, etc.), or a problem in the engine itself (manifold vacuum leak, bad valve, head gasket, etc.).
The condition of the diaphragm inside the booster is also important. If cracked, ruptured or leaking, it won't hold vacuum and can't provide much power assist. Leaks in the master cylinder can allow brake fluid to be siphoned into the booster, accelerating the demise of the diaphragm. So if there's brake fluid inside the vacuum hose, it's a good indication the master cylinder is leaking and needs to be rebuilt or replaced. Wetness around the back of the master cylinder would be another clue to this kind of problem.
To check the vacuum booster, pump the brake pedal with the engine off until you've bled off all the vacuum from the unit. Then hold the pedal down and start the engine. You should feel the pedal depress slightly as engine vacuum enters the booster and pulls on the diaphragm. No change? Then check the vacuum hose connection and engine vacuum. If okay, the problem is in the booster and the booster needs to be replaced.
Vacuum boosters also have an external one-way check valve at the hose inlet that closes when the engine is either shut off or stalls. This traps vacuum inside the booster so it can still provide one or two power assisted stops until the engine is restarted. The valve also helps maintain vacuum when intake vacuum is low (when the engine is under load or is running at wide open throttle). You can check the valve by removing it and trying to blow through it from both sides. It should pass air from the rear but not from the front.
Replacing a vacuum booster is a fairly straight forward job. All you have to do is disconnect it from the brake pedal on the inside and unbolt the master cylinder. The pushrod that runs from the booster into the back of the master cylinder must have the specified amount of play.
You will typically find the power brake booster mounted on the firewall attached to the master cylinder. The master cylinder is connected to the brake pedal.
Thanks. keep updated for any more query.you can rate this solution and show your appreciation.

Jul 15, 2010 | 1997 Ford F250 SuperCab

1 Answer

How to change a master cylinder


a Master rates about a 5 out of 10 with 10 being the hardest

you may find the hardest part is the actual bench bleeding of the master
and/or
the replacement of the reservoir

These are the instructions from my service manual, but I do not remove the fluid prior to service steps 2-6

  1. Disconnect battery ground cable. Disconnect electrical connector from filler cap.
  2. Remove fluid reservoir filler cap.
  3. Raise and support vehicle.
  4. Remove front wheels.
  5. Remove dust cap and loosen bleed nipple. Connect a bleed tube to bleed nipple and into a suitable container.
  6. Pump brake pedal until all fluid is expelled. Tighten bleed nipple.
  7. Lower vehicle. Install brake fluid reservoir cap. Remove air cleaner and air cleaner outlet tube.
  8. Disconnect central electrical box electrical connector.
  9. Remove central electrical box retaining screw.
  10. Remove central electrical box and relocate to air cleaner area.
  11. Disconnect brake fluid feed tube. Disconnect brake lines.
  12. On models with anti-lock brakes, disconnect brake lines from Hydraulic Control Unit.
  13. On all models, remove brake booster vacuum hose.
  14. Extract master cylinder from vehicle.
  15. On models with manual transaxles, remove clutch hose from brake/clutch reservoir.
  16. On all models, remove master cylinder nuts and remove master cylinder.

To install, reverse removal procedure. Bleed brake system.

May 31, 2010 | 2001 Ford Focus

1 Answer

Do you have instructions on removing and replacing master cylinder in 1993 GMC Sierra K3500 pickup?


REMOVING
Removing the master cylinder is really simple, only requiring a few steps. Keep in mind that brake fluid will eat the paint of the car. So use a plastic or vinyl type fender cover to protect the vehicle's paint. Brake fluid is water soluble so if you should get some on the paint, wash it off with plenty of water as quickly as possible.
  1. Using a siphon, an old turkey baster works great, empty the master cylinder reservoir and dispose of the old brake fluid in the proper manner.
  2. Disconnect the wire connector for the brake fluid level and/or brake pressure-warning switch, if your vehicle is so equipped.
  3. Disconnect the brake lines from the master cylinder with a line wrench. A line wrench is specially designed to remove and install hydraluic fittings without rounding them off.
  4. Remove the master cylinder mounting nuts, then the master cylinder.
  5. On non-power brake vehicles, disconnect the master cylinder linkage from the brake pedal underneath the dash.
  6. On models with separate fluid reservoirs, remove the reservoir.
REPLACING
Before installing the new master cylinder on the vehicle, it must first be bled using a specialized bleeder kit. The master-cylinder bleeder kit comes with tubing, clips and multiple adapters. Most new or rebuilt master cylinders come with a bleeder kit for that particular master cylinder.
  1. Begin by removing the cap.
  2. Follow the directions that come with the kit to select the suitable adapters, and then connect the adapters and tubes to the ports on the cylinder. The other ends of the tube extend down into the master cylinder, and are held in place by a plastic clip. Figure 2.
  3. With the bleeder kit installed, fill the master cylinder about halfway with new brake fluid. Use a large screwdriver to depress the valve assembly inside the master cylinder. If you do not have a vise you can mount the master cylinder on the vacuum brake booster and bleed the master cylinder.
  4. Small bubbles will appear in the fluid. Continue working the valve assembly until no more bubbles appear. This indicates that the cylinder has been thoroughly bled.Reverse the removal procedure to install the master cylinder, noting the following Refer to your service manual for any Master Cylinder Push Rod Adjustment procedures if your vehicle requires it.Bleed brakes as described under Brake Bleeding.Operate the brakes several times and check for external hydraulic leaks.This is fairly straightforward job. Replacing a master cylinder should take you about 1 to 2 hours, depending on the make and model of car. If you are rebuilding the master cylinder, add about another hour or so.

Oct 12, 2009 | 1993 GMC Sierra K3500

1 Answer

Fiat Uno Pacer - Brake Booster not assist braking


it could be that the master cylinder is bad or the brake booster is bad also check the vacum hose going to the brake booster if it has a hole in it it will lose pressure and make the engine lose rpms

Aug 16, 2009 | 2006 Fiat 124

2 Answers

Master cylinder out


check all cylinders, the MC is only one of the components that operates with brake fluid, you have brake calipers that can leak and also wheel cylinders on the rear of cars equipped with rear drum brakes.. check all of these for brake fluid seepage.. reapir as needed... also check for air in the system if the system has been opened recently or any recenmt service...

Aug 07, 2009 | 1983 Ford F150

2 Answers

I have a ford explorer brakes stopped working no


hello, it is very common for the cylinder in the master cylinder to seize...try to bleed the master cylinder, if no line pressure is found in either of the two lines replace the master cylinder and re-bleed the entire system....good luck, marty

Jun 09, 2009 | 1998 Ford Explorer

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