Question about 1995 Volkswagen Passat

7 Answers

VW 1.9 liter Turbo Diesel (not TDI) oil pan removal.

Am removing the oil pan on a VW1.9 liter turbo diesel engine code AAZ(not TDI). Ther oil is drained, the dip stick is removed, all retaining bolts are removed, the pan and gasket are separated from the block, yet the pan does not want to come off. Granted, I haven't stuck a screwdriver in there and pried. Is there something internal holding this thing on? Engine is out of vehicle, so there are no transmission bolts attached.

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  • serbo6 Jun 16, 2009

    The gasket is not in contact with the block, so it is not what is holding the oil pan up.

  • serbo6 Jun 16, 2009

    That solution was obviously for someone elses problem.
    Oil pan on 1.9liter VW turbo diesel doesn't want to come off. All retaining bolts are removed, gasket and pan are separated from the block, something internal it seems is catching or is attached to the oil pan. The chiltons manual I am following has no mention of anything of the sort.

  • serbo6 Jun 16, 2009

    1.9liter VW turbo diesel (not TDI). Removing oil pan. All retaining bolts are removed, gasket and pan are clear of the block yet oil pan does not want to come off. Even some gentle prying didn't help. Is there anything internal that may be catching on this? There are no external signs that this oil pan has been banged up in any way.

  • serbo6 Jun 16, 2009

    The only way to move the oil pan farther toward the transmission is to remove the flywheel and intermediate plate. Thats the direction I'm heading anyway.

  • serbo6 Jun 16, 2009

    Please refer to original problem in this thread

  • serbo6 Jun 17, 2009

    I don't think any of you have ever done this before as none of you were right. Anyway I fixed it myself. FYI: ther is a metal baffle which covers about the entire oil pan and is part of the gasket. It is also held up by the oil pick-up tube. The gasket had been glued to the oil pan. The "solution" was to soak the gasket in gasket remover, cut the seal between the gasket and oil pan, carefully pry the pan from the gasket, remove the pan, remove the oil pick up tube, remove the gasket/baffle. No need to respond to this problem as I fixed it myself.

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On the AAZ (non-TDI 1.9), the baffle is part of the pan gasket. Separate the pan from the gasket, and you should be able to get the pan off, then you can drop the pickup tube to get the baffle/gasket off.

Posted on Jan 31, 2016

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As you can tell - all "experts" on FixYa aren't experts at all.
Had I gotten your problem originally - you would have been satisfied immediately.
Thanks for using FixYa.

Posted on Jun 17, 2009

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There is a baffle around the oil pump intake screen to keep the pump in oil when u turn sharp and the like, u must move the pan in different directions to get it to come off, if the pan doesn't have clearance to move around then the engine mounts must be removed and the engine jacked up as high as possible, this is true of all engines, the pan doesn't drop down, it always requires moving side to side and up and down to drop it.

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

  • yadayada
    yadayada Jun 16, 2009

    sorry I missed the fact that the engine is out, info about pan is the same except for the part about jacking the engine up obviously.

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Please check the vent pipe and the foot pedal. sometimes, they are fixed to the base, with soldering.

here is the detailed working figure:
http://www.streettuned.com.au/images/uploads/CARBING%20-%20Oil%20Catch%20Tank%202.gif

have a nice time.
saumya.

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

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You are not able to remove the pan because the oil pump pick-up is holding up progress. There is a baffle welded in the bottom of the oil pan and you need to maneuver the pan towards the transmission to clear the pick-up of the baffle. You may need to go side to side and this should help. There is also the problem of the oil pan rails and front of the pan clearing the main bearing caps. I find that if you unbolt the motor mounts and raise the motor up as far as possible, the pan will clear the bearing caps. Hope this helps.

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

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Your turbocharger bearings are probably shot and a new set of bearings or turbine shaft will be needed. The black smoke is most likely burning oil out of the turbocharger and would explain the black smoke on acceleration. Make sure of this by doing a compression test on the cylinders.

There was no oil in the bottom of it which was what he was expecting to find. Turbo appears to be working but not at full capacity. He checked the fuel system also and all looked nowmal there. Only thing that hasnt been checked are the injectors. Its a pain in the exhaust . I have very little patience for these sort of problems. Never had any bad experiences with 9 years of volkswagon cars. This is the first to give trouble


There was no oil in the bottom of it which was what he was expecting to find. Turbo appears to be working but not at full capacity. He checked the fuel system also and all looked nowmal there. Only thing that hasnt been checked are the injectors. Its a pain in the exhaust . I have very little patience for these sort of problems. Never had any bad experiences with 9 years of volkswagon cars. This is the first to give trouble



Your tech probably will not find any oil residue on the turbocharger. Your talking about a leak that might only occur at several hundred RPM. Is there lateral and end play of the turbine shaft? The only other possibility is the timing chain or belt. It might be worn badly enough that the tensioner inside does not keep the slack out of the belt causing it to change the timing slightly under acceleration. It is possible that the computer is not changing the timing properly which could be caused by low boost from your turbo or a problem with the CPS sensor. Try to see how the car behaves without the turbocharger and leave the exhaust uncapped. It will be loud but can rule out several problems depending on what you experience. Find a car repair manual for your Volkswagen Passat Repair Question.










you can try and replace the seals and gasket 1st but I would recommend replacing the cooler and all
good luck





anyparts stock in

auto parts stores

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

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  • mohammed marika thambi
    mohammed marika thambi Jun 16, 2009




    Usually if it leaks that much overnight the problem is low on the engine
    like a drain plug or possible pan gasket. Some VW's have an aluminum
    oil pan that is hanging down in harms way, I have replaced a few for
    cracks from hitting things







  • mohammed marika thambi
    mohammed marika thambi Jun 16, 2009

    The the turbo is basically an air pump driven by
    the expanding exhaust gasses. The turbo runs at extremly high
    temperatures and relies a good oil flow for lubrication and cooling,
    the oil will dissipate a huge amount of heat. If the oil gallery was
    still partly blocked by any sludge that restricted the oil flow, this
    may have had a bearing on the turbo failing. Unfortuanately you may be
    at ends to prove anything,


  • mohammed marika thambi
    mohammed marika thambi Jun 16, 2009

    Remove the oil pan using the procedure found in this section.


    Some engines, such as the may have a crankshaft oil deflector (also
    called a "windage tray"). Remove the retaining nuts and remove the oil
    deflector.


    Remove the bolt attaching the oil pump to the rear crankshaft bearing cap.


    Remove the oil pump and driveshaft.








    INSTALLATION:

    Clean all parts well. Inspect the driveshaft at both ends for
    rounding of the corners. Replace, if necessary. If the original pump is
    being considered for reuse, inspect the pump body and the pump cover
    for cracks, scoring, casting imperfections, or any obvious damage.

    Rotate the pump driveshaft as necessary to engage the with the oil
    pump. Make sure it turns smoothly. Some technicians will fill the oil
    pump through the opening next to the driveshaft to shorten the time it
    take the engine to buildup oil pressure on initial startup after an oil
    pump replacement. Turning the driveshaft as oil is being added fills
    the pump cavity.


    Install the pump and driveshaft assembly to the engine. Install the retaining bolt and tighten to:


    3.1L engines: 30 ft. lbs. (41 Nm)


    3.4L engines: 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm)


    Install the oil pan using the procedure found in this section.


  • mohammed marika thambi
    mohammed marika thambi Jun 16, 2009

    WARNING


    As with many procedures on the 3.5L (VIN H) DOHC engine, oil pump
    removal is a long and complicated task The oil pump is located behind
    the engine front cover. The engine front cover must be removed. Part of
    the procedure is lowering the powertrain cradle, or subframe, requiring
    special lifting and support equipment. The steering shaft must be
    separated so the vehicle subframe can be loosened and lowered. Careful
    work is required for reassembly. This is not a job for the
    inexperienced or ill-equipped. Be very sure of your diagnosis before
    attempting to remove the oil pump on this engine, especially with the
    engine still in the vehicle. In addition, a pair of special tools, GM
    #J 42042 Camshaft Timing Clamps, is required to hold the camshafts in
    place once the timing chain is removed. This tool, when properly
    installed, will be fully seated on the camshaft ends with the camshaft
    flats parallel to the cam cover sealing surfaces. This tool prevents
    unexpected camshaft rotation caused by valve spring pressure. This tool
    must be installed immediately after cam cover removal. This engine has
    no valve timing marks. Once lost, there are no pins or keys to help you
    re-establish valve timing. If valve timing is lost, it is very
    difficult to restore.


  • mohammed marika thambi
    mohammed marika thambi Jun 16, 2009

    The pan isn't too hard to replace, just drain it. Then, remove the bolts holding it to the engine. After that remove the old gasket and replace and reverse the order.





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The gasket is most likely just holding it up and a little prying is needed like you think. As long as all of the bolts around it are taken out, you should be fine to start prying out. Then you will need to scrape the old gasket off and replace it. Let me know if you have any other questions.


Benjamin

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

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