Question about 1996 Pontiac Firebird

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Engine overheating engine temperature tends to run somewhat high although I can detect no loss of coolant or any leeks and I doubt if there is a problem with gasket what do you think?

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  • yadayada
    yadayada May 11, 2010

    all birds run hot.

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Firebirds do run hotter because they don't get as much air up and under the air dam and front end. What temp does it run at?

Posted on Jun 28, 2009

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  • Pontiac Master
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It needs a new thermostat.

Posted on Jun 19, 2009

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1 Answer

My 2008 Pontiac torrent gage is stuck at the top where the over heating mark is but there is no other indicators that it is overheating what does this mean.


The engine control module (ECM) calculates the engine coolant temperature as determined by the coolant temperature sensor. The ECM sends the engine coolant temperature to the body control module (BCM) via the serial data circuit. The instrument panel cluster (IPC) displays the engine coolant temperature when the BCM sends a serial data message to the IPC indicating the engine coolant temperature. The engine coolant temperature gage defaults to 0° or below if:
• The ECM detects a malfunction in the engine coolant temperature sensor circuit.
• The IPC detects a loss of serial data communications with the BCM.
• The BCM detects a loss of serial data communications with the ECM

The place to start would be to hook up a factory or professional scan tool to see what the actual coolant temperature is ! At the PCM then at the BCM and finally at the instrument cluster . If normal the gauge is bad . The instrument cluster would need to be taken out of the vehicle an sent to be repaired . Or you could buy a used one out of a salvage yard or from on e-bay etc....

Dec 30, 2016 | 2008 Pontiac Torrent

1 Answer

Where is the tempature guage sensor


The temperature gauge sensor as you call is for more then just the temperature gauge . The temp. sensor is an input to the PCM -engine computer ! If it were bad you would have drivability problems , the transmission would not shift correctly an the check engine light would more then likely be lit .
Engine Coolant Temperature Gage
The IPC displays the engine coolant temperature as determined by the PCM. The body control module (BCM) receives a class 2 message from the PCM indicating the engine coolant temperature. The BCM converts the engine coolant temperature into a percent gage deflection. The IPC receives a message from the BCM via the serial peripheral interface (SPI) indicating the requested gage position. The engine coolant temperature gage defaults to 38?°C (100?°F) or below if:
?€¢
The PCM detects a malfunction in the engine coolant temperature sensor circuit.


?€¢
The BCM detects a loss of class 2 communications with the PCM.


?€¢
The IPC detects a loss of SPI communications with the BCM.


Your gauge is more suspect then the sensor . gm had a problem with stepper motors that control the pointer for the gauge !

Sep 01, 2015 | 2001 Chevrolet Chevrolet Malibu LS

1 Answer

I have unseen coolant loss with no overheating unless coolant gets to low. Can the coolant loss be through the intake manifold gaskets? My vehicle is a 2002 Chrysler 3.8 in a Town and County van (No rear...


it is unlikely that it would be leaking through the intake manifold gasket as such, but loss of water is usually caused by leakage, but they are not always easy to find, depending how much water you are losing as to where it is leaking,sometimes if it is a leaking water hose at the clamp it will only leak when you first start the engine & stop when the engine warms up ( very hard to detect) it could be the head gasket is starting to blow check the exhaust pipe when the engine gets up to normal running temperature to see if there is any steam coming out if so that may well be the problem......hope this helps......cheers.

Aug 16, 2011 | 2002 Chrysler Town & Country

1 Answer

After a few minutes of driving the engine begins to overheat. The engine signal and the warning cooling light both come on. Although the engine temperature is 90 degrees, the indoor heating fan is still...


There could be 3 possible problems here.

If the dashboard is saying the engine is overheating at 90 degrees and there is still cold air coming through then the thermostat could be faulty. I would suggest that you remove the thermostat and place it in a beaker of boiling water. If the top begins to open as the temperature rises, then it is fine. If not, then the thermostat will need to be replaced.

If the thermostat is fine, I would then suggest that you check your coolant levels, the coolant pressure or make sure there isn't a crack in the radiator. If there isn't enough coolant in the system then it won't perform to its highest standards. If the coolant pressure is too low, then it won't be able to cool high temperatures, although 90 degrees isn't very high for the engine to overheat. If your radiator has a crack in it then it will be leaking coolant which would explain a low coolant level and loss of pressure.

A third problem could be air getting into the heating system which will cause air to get trapped in the radiator. This would stop the normal flow of coolant. So now I would suggest checking the cylinder head gasket and do a pressure test to see if there is any air getting into the system.

Feb 02, 2011 | 2002 Volkswagen Golf

1 Answer

1990 300c overheating. Are both electric fans supposed to come on? Any help would be appropriated. There is no coolant in oil or out the tail pipe as far as i can tell. Has hesitation. Temp keeps going...


I assume you have checked the cooling system to ensure that first, that it is completely full of coolant (not just the overflow tank) with no air locks and second that there are no leaks anywhere and the radiator cap is in good condition. The heater hoses and those pesky little bypass hoses in the cooling system tend to go hard and split if they are over 10 years old, allowing coolant loss. Those spring type hose clamps tend to be less effective in clamping as the hoses become hard. Worm drive ones are the best to use. Both cooling fans operate together on most larger cars.

If there are no leaks or air locks, the over heating could also be caused by a clogged radiator (more than 15% restriction in the radiator flow capacity will cause overheating problems), a faulty water pump or a faulty thermostat.

If there are no leaks and water pump and thermostat are working correctly, but undetected loss of coolant once the engine heats up, then it could indicate a problem with the head gasket (Usually caused by allowing engine to become excessively overheated when cooling system has run dry) allowing very hot high pressure combustion gases into the engine water jacket, which super heats the coolant in the engine block, which then boils off, and is released via the cap.

If unsure take vehicle to a cooling system specialist and have them do a pressure test and more thorough diagnosis.

Sep 30, 2010 | 1992 Mercedes-Benz Mercedes Benz 300 Class

1 Answer

Car is over heating what could it be


I assume you have checked the cooling system to ensure that first, that it is completely full of coolant (not just the overflow tank) with no air locks and second that there are no leaks and the radiator cap is in good condition. The heater hoses and those pesky little bypass hoses in the cooling system tend to go hard and split if they are over 10 years old, allowing coolant loss. Those spring type hose clamps tend to be less effective in clamping as the hoses become hard. Worm drive ones are the best to use.

If there are no leaks or air locks, the over heating could also be caused by a clogged radiator (more than 15% restriction in the radiator flow capacity will cause overheating problems), a faulty water pump or a faulty thermostat.

If there are no leaks but undetected loss of coolant, then it could indicate a problem with the head gasket (Usually caused by allowing engine to become excessively overheated when cooling system has run dry) allowing high pressure combustion gases into the engine water jacket, which super heats the coolant which then boils off, and is released via the cap.

If unsure take vehicle to cooling system specialist and have them do a pressure test and more thorough diagnosis.

Sep 21, 2010 | Mazda 929 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The car is overheating i do not know where the thermostat is


I assume you have checked the cooling system to ensure that first that it is full of coolant and second that there are no leaks and the radiator cap is in good condition. The heater hoses and those pesky little bypass hoses in the cooling system tend to go hard and split if they are over 10 years old, allowing coolant loss. If there are no leaks or air locks, the over heating could also be caused by a clogged radiator (more than 15% restriction in the radiator flow capacity will cause overheating problems), a faulty water pump or as you suspect, a faulty thermostat.
If there are no leaks but undetected loss of coolant, then it could indicate a problem with the head gasket (Usually caused by allowing engine to become excessively overheated when cooling system has run dry) allowing high pressure combustion gases into the engine water jacket, which super heats the coolant which then boils off, and is released via the cap.
If unsure take vehicle to cooling system specialist and have them do a pressure test and more thorough diagnosis.

Aug 28, 2010 | 2000 BMW 3 Series

2 Answers

Over heating


Make sure the engine is cold!! There are only three areas for checking assuming that you have been running the car with sufficient coolant in the system 1) Coolant filler cap, This must have tight seal as it maintains the coolant under pressure when the engine is hot. Failure of the seal will result in no pressure build up in the subsequent loss of coolant by boiling off. 2) Check the thermostat, located within the metal housing immediately connected to the top hose of the radiator. Put the thermostat in a clear heat resistant jug and pour in boiling water. You should see that the thermostat should open immediately and remain open until the temperature drops below about 85C. If it does not, try a couple of more times to be sure and then buy a replacement. 3) Fan issues, If the viscous coupling at the back of the fan has gone the car will tend to overheat quickly when in slow traffic or even just idling. Conversely on the move the car will tend to remain cooler for longer as air is forced through the radiator matrix. A little trick to try in an emergency is to put the car heater to full heat with a full fan. Uncomfortable but the additional heat taken out of the engine cooling system can help prevent the engine overheating. The lack of viscous coupling can be felt by turning the fan blades. They should be sluggish even when cold and not spin after flicking over. If the fan does spin freely a new viscous coupling will need to be fitted. Engineers design cooling systems, thermostat, fan speed, radiator size etc. to cope with the anticipated heat output of the engine with surprisingly little margin; an overcooled engine is inefficient. Even a slight loss of effectiveness by just one component in the system can lead to overheating. Water pumps only cause over heating when the front seal fails and allows all the coolant water to drain out. This is obvious to see: loss of coolant from the reservoir and a brown stain running perpendicular to the front of the engine around the bay and hood innards corresponding to the line of the fan blades distributing the lost coolant

Apr 16, 2010 | 1999 Pontiac Sunfire

2 Answers

Over heating


When your temperature gauge reaches "H' it may too late to prevent a major breakdown. Knowing the symptoms of an overheated car and how they occur may be the difference between being inconvenienced and incapacitated.
Identification:---Other than a low oil level or low oil pressure light, there is not a more significant part of a car's instrumentation than a rising temperature gauge or a glowing "Hot" light. These lights are really the only confirmation a driver has that his car is really overheating. It is the identification of the symptoms of an overheating car that enable the motorist to avert a badly damaged engine. Overheating is always a traumatic event for a car's engine, which makes the early identification of the symptom an important addition to the informed motorist's tool kit.
Stuck Thermostat:--The car's thermostat is a valve that controls coolant flow from the engine block to the radiator. When the engine is cold the thermostat remains closed so that the coolant can reach operating temperature quicker and also provide heat to the passenger's compartment. The thermostat has a spring on it that moves depending on coolant temperature causing the thermostat to open. Sometimes the thermostat fails to open thus restricting coolant flow to the radiator where it would be cooled down. This condition is often the cause of overheating. The symptoms of this cause would be a rising temperature gauge and possibly the loss of heat inside the car.
Restricted Radiator:---A car's radiator will have thousands of gallons of coolant passing through in its lifetime. Along with the coolant comes particulate matter in the form of corrosion breaking loose from various parts of the car's cooling system. These contaminates collect in the tubes of the radiator reducing its efficiency. Extensive "plugging" in the radiator will cause the car to overheat. The symptom of this condition would be a rising temperature gauge which goes up when you accelerate.
Coolant Loss:--A car's cooling system is a closed loop system. You are not supposed to lose coolant. Sufficient coolant loss will cause the engine to run hot because engine is heating less coolant to higher temperatures. The symptom of overheating induced by coolant loss would be a pool of coolant on the pavement when the leak is external. Steam under the hood as the lost coolant hits hot parts of the engine, or a rising temperature gauge in the case of a undetectable engine related leak. Of course, the gauge would also go up if the leaks were not detected. Deteriorated Water Pump:--Cars use a belt driven pump to push the water and coolant mixture through the cooling system. This part is called the water pump. Rarely the impeller that draws the coolant through the pump will rust away making it impossible to push any through the system. If this occurs the temperature gauge will climb and coolant will boil over in the radiator. Inoperable Fan:----Most cooling fans are electrically driven. Some are driven by fan belts. If a belt breaks or the electric supply to the fan is interrupted overheating may result. Electric fans are tuned on thermostatically when needed. When the car runs at idle for extended periods or the weather is extremely hot, a failed fan will cause overheating otherwise it serves as a standby assist to the rest of the cooling system. In stress conditions an inoperable fan will cause the temperature gauge to rise. This will help. Thanks please keep updated.please please do rate the solution positively .thank you for using fixya

Mar 19, 2010 | 2001 Hyundai Accent

1 Answer

Replaced cracked radiator in 2000 Chrysler LHS but car still overheating. What could be the problem?


fix the radiator first.because coolant temperature sensor need to be in antifreeze.when antifreeze get up to 190 degrees. the coolant sensor act as a thermostat.it resistance decrease then the pcm will command cooling fans to run.if antifreeze low the coolant temperature sensor not going to work. engine is going to over heat.

May 29, 2009 | 2000 Chrysler LHS

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