Question about 1996 Pontiac Firebird

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Overheating temperature runs high wile driving for a while but there is no loss of coolant or sign of a leak

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You might need to replace your thermostat. If it going bad it may not be opening. its only about 15 bucks for a new one, and while your at it change your temp sensor, also about 15 bucks. If that doesn't help then your water pump may be going out. The easiest way to cheack that is the following: Make sure the engine is cold i.e. let is sit for several hours. remove your radiator cap and start the engine. look inside where your radiator cap was and see if the coolant is circulating. If it is, your pump is probably fine. CAUTION don't do this if your engine is even close to warm, otherwise the coolant may come shooting out and burn you severley.

Posted on Jun 20, 2009

  • arsenault185 Jan 23, 2010

    One caveat to that: once you start your engine, you need to let it warm up. Coolant doesn't usually flow until it reaches a certain temperature, around 170 degrees F. it wont shoot out at you if the cap is off before it heats up. On the other hand, if you start a cold engine and immediately see the fluid running, then your thermostat is likely bad, and locked in the "open" position.

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Changed out water pump and thermostat and vehicle runs high temperature what could be issue?


Reasons the Temperature Gauge Reads High

If the temperature gauge reads high, it could mean your engine is overheating. Another reason your reading might be high is you could be losing coolant. A small leak or evaporation may cause your radiator to slowly lose coolant. A third reason your temperature gauge reads high could be because the thermostat is broken. If this is the case, you may need a coolant temperature switch replacement. The last reason the temperature gauge could read high is because of a water pump, or water pump gasket failure. If the water pump is malfunctioning, it may need to be replaced by a professional.

What to Do If Your Temperature Gauge is High

If your temperature gauge is reading high, it means your car is overheating. This is a very serious matter and you should never drive an overheating car. If your car starts to overheat, shut off the air conditioner and open the windows immediately. If this does not reduce the overheating, turn on the heater as high as it can go. If this still doesn't work, pull over on the side of the road, turn off the engine, open the hood carefully, and wait until the vehicle cools down. Never open the radiator cap while the engine is hot - coolant can spray and burn you. Once the vehicle has cooled, take the car to a mechanic right away so they can diagnose the problem. Cars are especially susceptible to overheating in hot climates, like what's common in cities like Los Angeles, Phoenix, Las Vegas, or Atlanta.
The temperature gauge is an important tool in your vehicle that shows the temperature of your engine's coolant. Contact YourMechanic and have your car inspected for overheating if it reads too high, as this can cause serious problems...

Reasons the Temperature Gauge Reads Cold

On most vehicles, the temperature gauge reads cold until the engine has run for a few minutes. If the temperature gauge still reads cold after the engine has warmed up, the gauge may simply be broken. Another reason the temperature gauge could read cold is if the thermostat in the vehicle stays open. With the thermostat stuck open, the engine can be overcooled, causing a low temperature reading. If this is the case, the thermostat may need to be replaced.

Oct 28, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

Vehicle overheating tips


If your vehicle engine coolant temperature gauge indicates overheating, if you experience a loss of power,or if you hear a loud knocking or pinging noise, the engine has probably overheated. You should follow this procedure............

Pull safe off the road, stop the vehicle and turn on our emergency flasher. Put the transmission in "P" (automatic) or neutral (manual) and apply the parking brake. Turn off the air conditioning if it is being used.

If coolant or steam is boiling out of the radiator or reservoir, stop the engine. Wait until the steam subsides before opening the hood. If there is no coolant boiling over the steam, leave the engine running. CAUTION: To avoid personal injury, keep the hood closed until there is not steam. Escaping steam or coolant is a sign of very hing pressure.

Visually check to see if the engine drive belt (fan belt) is broken or loose. Lock for obvious coolant leaks from the radiator, hoses, and under the vehicle. However, note that water draining from the air conditioning is normal if it has been used. CAUTION: When the engine is running, keep hands and clothing away from the moving fan engine drive belt.

If the engine drive belt is broken or the coolant is leaking, stop the engine immediately and call your mechanic of assistance.

If the engine drive belt is okay and there are no obvious leaks, you may help the engine cool down more quickly by running it at about 1500 rpm for a few minutes with the accelerator pedal lightly depressed.

Check the coolant reservoir. If it is dry, add coolant to the reservoir while the engine is running. Fill it about half full. CAUTION:Do not attempt to remove the radiator cap when the radiator are hot. Serious injury could result from scalding hot fluid and steam blown out under pressure.

After the engine coolant temperature has cooled to normal, again check the coolant level in the reservoir. If necessary, bring it up to half full again. Serious coolant loos indicates a leak in the system. You should have it checked as soon as possible at your mechanic's workshop.

Good luck.

on Nov 08, 2010 | Toyota Pickup Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Car overheating causing fluid to come out of the reservoir


Change your thermostat. Ensure that your radiator fan is running at idle. See if your heat blows warm or not when the engine is warmed. if the heat is clod, then you have no water circulation in your engine. either the thermostat isnt opening up, or there is a blockage in your cooling system.

Jan 11, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Overheating


Overheating can be "boiled" down to a few issues:
*blockage: Something is stopping or slowing the flow. Main suspect is the thermostat. It is designed to open and close at the proper temperature so as to keep the engine at the optimum temperature range. They have a tendency to lock closed and cause overheating. Sometimes it's random. The blockage may be something like sludge or rust in the radiator or gunk that someone put in that does not agree with it.

*coolant/water loss. A leak somewhere. Blown head gasket, cracked head/block, hose, etc.
*pressure loss. This happens when the water gets to boiling temperature but is kept under control by pressure (pressure resists heat) and then something such as the radiator cap releases the pressure and the temperature rises. The coolant will also leak out and then the overheating will be due coolant loss as well. This is especially true with the Cadillac Northstar. The head bolts allow the head to lift off the block, ever so slightly, and pressurize the coolant system with exhaust gases beyond radiator cap pressure limits. It's usually when you accelerate or put the engine under load such as going up hill.

^check for exhaust gases in the coolant. smell it or buy a kit to test.
^get a new thermostat, or, test the old one by boiling it in water on the stove; see if it opens. I always get the "failsafe" kind: fails in the open position.
^check for oil in the coolant or coolant in the oil: grey sludge.
^check for leaks on the ground.
^test the radiator cap. some part stores have a way to test them.
^check to see if it's made by Cadillac. look for the word Northstar. If so, hold on to your wallet. There's a whole new world of overheating adventures.

Oct 27, 2013 | 2001 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

2001 Oldsmobile Silhouette...Overheating, changed the thermostat, no signs of leaking, and the oil looks fine. At idle it takes 20 minutes to max the temperature gauge (red) and while driving it take


Usually the problem with no heat and overheating is low coolant, thermostat, or a faulty water pump impeller.
The radiator may not be full of liquid coolant, or the pump may not be moving the coolant thru the block.

Feb 19, 2013 | 2001 Oldsmobile Silhouette

2 Answers

1998 cadillac deville leaking coolant, temperature was around 196 and when leaking started temperature has gone as high as 225, what is causing this problem?


This most certainly sounds like a water pump issue. The thermostate is located inside the water pump housing and if the pump is bad you'l lose fluids and need to add every day or so. The temp guage will run hot and often the heater won't warm up. You have even notice fluids on the ground below the front passenger side of the car. Try getting a pressure test first before replacing anything. That's a good place to start the diagnosis.

Dec 15, 2010 | 1998 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

White smoke coming out of exhaust, engine not overheating loss of power does not appear to be losing water


White smoke from the exhaust is a sign of coolant entering the combustion chamber. You say no coolant loss, or overheating. Is there a white foamy substance under the oil cap, & air bubbles escaping from the radiator? If so you have a leak and more than likely it is a blown head gasket. I would have a cooling system pressure test run. Do not continue to drive this Ford in this condition. Something is not right and you need to find out what is going on.

Apr 09, 2010 | 2000 Ford Focus

2 Answers

Over heating


When your temperature gauge reaches "H' it may too late to prevent a major breakdown. Knowing the symptoms of an overheated car and how they occur may be the difference between being inconvenienced and incapacitated.
Identification:---Other than a low oil level or low oil pressure light, there is not a more significant part of a car's instrumentation than a rising temperature gauge or a glowing "Hot" light. These lights are really the only confirmation a driver has that his car is really overheating. It is the identification of the symptoms of an overheating car that enable the motorist to avert a badly damaged engine. Overheating is always a traumatic event for a car's engine, which makes the early identification of the symptom an important addition to the informed motorist's tool kit.
Stuck Thermostat:--The car's thermostat is a valve that controls coolant flow from the engine block to the radiator. When the engine is cold the thermostat remains closed so that the coolant can reach operating temperature quicker and also provide heat to the passenger's compartment. The thermostat has a spring on it that moves depending on coolant temperature causing the thermostat to open. Sometimes the thermostat fails to open thus restricting coolant flow to the radiator where it would be cooled down. This condition is often the cause of overheating. The symptoms of this cause would be a rising temperature gauge and possibly the loss of heat inside the car.
Restricted Radiator:---A car's radiator will have thousands of gallons of coolant passing through in its lifetime. Along with the coolant comes particulate matter in the form of corrosion breaking loose from various parts of the car's cooling system. These contaminates collect in the tubes of the radiator reducing its efficiency. Extensive "plugging" in the radiator will cause the car to overheat. The symptom of this condition would be a rising temperature gauge which goes up when you accelerate.
Coolant Loss:--A car's cooling system is a closed loop system. You are not supposed to lose coolant. Sufficient coolant loss will cause the engine to run hot because engine is heating less coolant to higher temperatures. The symptom of overheating induced by coolant loss would be a pool of coolant on the pavement when the leak is external. Steam under the hood as the lost coolant hits hot parts of the engine, or a rising temperature gauge in the case of a undetectable engine related leak. Of course, the gauge would also go up if the leaks were not detected. Deteriorated Water Pump:--Cars use a belt driven pump to push the water and coolant mixture through the cooling system. This part is called the water pump. Rarely the impeller that draws the coolant through the pump will rust away making it impossible to push any through the system. If this occurs the temperature gauge will climb and coolant will boil over in the radiator. Inoperable Fan:----Most cooling fans are electrically driven. Some are driven by fan belts. If a belt breaks or the electric supply to the fan is interrupted overheating may result. Electric fans are tuned on thermostatically when needed. When the car runs at idle for extended periods or the weather is extremely hot, a failed fan will cause overheating otherwise it serves as a standby assist to the rest of the cooling system. In stress conditions an inoperable fan will cause the temperature gauge to rise. This will help. Thanks please keep updated.please please do rate the solution positively .thank you for using fixya

Mar 19, 2010 | 2001 Hyundai Accent

3 Answers

Overheating


Yes, needing to add coolant, obviously calls for some investigation. Check & make sure coolant return bottle doesn't have a slow leak. Perhaps after a good drive down the highway, park it somewhere that you will see any liquid under it, after it sits for a while. Other option is to take it to a rad shop, or repair shop & have them pressure test the system, which shouldn't cost much, if anything. If it reveals a leak, then you need to dig a little deeper for cause. As far as the 2 fans coming on, usually passenger side will only come on with AC or defrost on, the other should be coming on regularly when coolant temperature in rad reaches proper temperature that requires cooling .

May 24, 2009 | 1997 Nissan Maxima

1 Answer

Overheating


are you loosing coolant fluid? check for leaks around the hoses and in the radiator areas.

Jul 18, 2008 | 2003 Ford Explorer

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