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Crank sensor resistance

Where is it located

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Crank and cam sensor replaced . cars starts and run but still reads code 335 . cranksensor circuit malfunction. and idea whats the issue why this code is still coming up.?


the sensor may be good its the circuit code which means can be a wiring /connection problem not just the sensor the following link is courtesy of obd-codes.comP0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction What does that mean? The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set. Symptoms NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include: Vehicle may not start (see above) Vehicle may run rough or misfire MIL illumination Causes A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by: Damaged CKP sensor connector Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway) Sensor output open Sensor output shorted to ground Sensor output shorted to voltage Failed crank sensor Broken timing belt Failed PCM Possible Solutions Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs? If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay? If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault. This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335
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http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335

Aug 19, 2015 | 2005 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

What problems will code po335 cause


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day

Feb 23, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

2005 CHYSLER CODE PO335 WHAT IS IT


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Feb 23, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

2005 nissan altima codes p0725, po335. how to fix


P0335 Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction P0725 Engine Speed input Circuit Malfunction
  1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
  2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manualmag-glass_10x10.gif. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
  3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
  4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

Sep 10, 2011 | 2004 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

PO727, PO335, PO700


this is an obd2 trouble code table, you can understand the meaning of code.
for p0335, you can try:
Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.

If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?

If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?

If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

for

Aug 04, 2011 | 2005 Chevrolet Equinox

1 Answer

It show code po385


P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms:

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:

Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

Causes: A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
* Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
* If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
* If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
* If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps (remember to rate this answer).

Jun 07, 2011 | 2001 Oldsmobile Intrigue

1 Answer

Hi have 2001 chevy s1o pick up have engine light on with code po335 crank sensor circuit problem had sensor and pig tail connector replaced still have same problem around 2500 rpm engine brakes up engine...


P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction

The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

Symptoms:
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
* Vehicle may not start (see above)
* Vehicle may run rough or misfire
* MIL illumination

Causes: A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
* Damaged CKP sensor connector
* Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
* Sensor output open
* Sensor output shorted to ground
* Sensor output shorted to voltage
* Failed crank sensor
* Broken timing belt
* Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Test it and keep us updated.

Feb 05, 2011 | 2001 Chevrolet S-10

1 Answer

Were is the cam shaft senor and the crank shaft senor located


this car does not have a camshaft sensor the distributor pick up coil acts as a cam sensor here is crank sensor info the crank sensor is located in front of engine just behind the crankshaft pulley using ohmmeter check resistance between terminals on sensor replace is not within specs cold 1630-2740 ohms hot 2065-3225 ohms if this is not the problem please reply to your post ill monitor it. hope this helps

Jul 26, 2010 | 1996 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

What does code 385 mean


P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction

What does that mean?
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
* Vehicle may not start (see above)
* Vehicle may run rough or misfire
* MIL illumination

Causes
A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
* Damaged CKP sensor connector
* Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
* Sensor output open
* Sensor output shorted to ground
* Sensor output shorted to voltage
* Failed crank sensor
* Failed PCM

Possible Solutions
1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope helps (remember rated this).

Jun 14, 2010 | 1995 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Ck engine light on code po335 p1336 also location of sensor?


P0335 and P0336 Engine crank sensor malfunction
To test this code, have a visual inspection of the location and wirings of the crank sensor. If the engine has a cam sensor, you might mistook it as the crank sensor (it is a good idea to contact ATS that can research this for you). Check the sensor wires for insulation making sure it is getting a voltage signal as shown in the wiring diagram. Sometimes, the wires itself is soaked with dirty oil causing the sensor to fail. If OK, check the engine timing belt system for any slack which can also cause the sensor to throw in the code. If all of these prove OK, remove the crank sensor and check it for resistance as compared to the standard specs. Lots of times, if the sensor probe end is contaminated with oil or cracked, this can only be revealed after the crank sensor is removed

Jun 02, 2009 | 1999 Pontiac Montana

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