Question about Nissan Pathfinder

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What is the proper resistance reading For the crankshaft position sensor a 2001 Nissan pathfinder v6

I have trouble code p0335 on my 2001 Nissan Pathfinder. I am trying to test the crankshaft position sensor By checking the resistance of the sensor and that of the connection/wiring harness. What is the proper resistance reading for the sensor and the wiring harness. I know there are two sensors.I am checking the one on the front of the engine near the harmonic balancer and the oil filter. I don't have a repair manual so anyone's help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

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  • Nissan Master
  • 3,187 Answers

Even a faulty sensor will have the same reading as a good one most times it when its over heated or the sensor inside has moved. don't tell any one but you can fix them. you re heat them up get were the sensor is mounted inside and just heat that area up ive done it with a lighter then use a flat blade or something and push it flat again. done this a few times on different models and it has worked fine. don't work on crank sensors.

Posted on Mar 22, 2014

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 94 Answers

SOURCE: need to change crankshaft position sensor for 2001 elantra

down by your crank shaft pulley you will find a sensor with 2 wires ruining into it and 1 bolt holding the sensor in remove the bolt and twist and pull on the sensor then slide the new sensor in then reinstall bolt and wire

Posted on Mar 08, 2009

csmock132
  • 4669 Answers

SOURCE: Removing harmonic balancer & replacing crankshaft sensor

The bolt is right hand thread. I do believe it is adjustable. But you can readjust it if needed after the balance is installed from the bottom.

Posted on Jun 02, 2009

  • 8 Answers

SOURCE: P0335 CRANK POSITION SENSOR A CIRCUIT MALFUNTION

crank sensors are usually located in/near the distributor.

Posted on Jun 07, 2009

NismoMaster
  • 146 Answers

SOURCE: Crankshaft Position Sensor Error P0335 recurred after r&r

In the kit there are two sensor that look identical. The one for the crankshaft has a white paint mark on it near the bolt hole. Make sure that it is in the right location.

Posted on Jul 26, 2009

angelo_mlc
  • 1035 Answers

SOURCE: where is the bank one sensor 2 oxygen sensor

The diagram below is from the Factory Service Manual for a 2001.0 year Pathfinder. The rear oxygen sensors are parts 1 and 3. They are easy to spot from under the car, in the region of the front wheels.


angelo_mlc.jpg

Posted on Nov 06, 2010

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Crank and cam sensor replaced . cars starts and run but still reads code 335 . cranksensor circuit malfunction. and idea whats the issue why this code is still coming up.?


the sensor may be good its the circuit code which means can be a wiring /connection problem not just the sensor the following link is courtesy of obd-codes.comP0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction What does that mean? The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set. Symptoms NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include: Vehicle may not start (see above) Vehicle may run rough or misfire MIL illumination Causes A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by: Damaged CKP sensor connector Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway) Sensor output open Sensor output shorted to ground Sensor output shorted to voltage Failed crank sensor Broken timing belt Failed PCM Possible Solutions Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs? If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay? If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault. This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335
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http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335

Aug 19, 2015 | 2005 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Where is the crankshaft position sensor on 2006 Nissan Sentra 1.8s?


"The crankshaft position sensor (POS) is located on the cylinder block rear housing facing the gear teeth (cogs) of the signal plate at the end of the crankshaft."



did you clear the trouble code first and see if it returned?!?

P0335

Mar 03, 2015 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Chysler 300 code po335


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Feb 27, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

What problems will code po335 cause


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day

Feb 23, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

2005 CHYSLER CODE PO335 WHAT IS IT


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Feb 23, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

Trouble code p0335


Replace the crankshaft position sensor and you should be up and running like normal. Verify that there is no power or ground problem to the crankshaft sensor, the Yellow/Black wire should have battery voltage any time the key is on and the main relay is energized.Verify that the Brown/Yellow wire has a good ground. If all is good then replace.


P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

Symptoms:
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination


A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.


Hope helps.

Dec 18, 2011 | 2006 Jeep Liberty

1 Answer

It show code po385


P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms:

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:

Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

Causes: A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
* Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
* If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
* If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
* If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps (remember to rate this answer).

Jun 07, 2011 | 2001 Oldsmobile Intrigue

1 Answer

Hi have 2001 chevy s1o pick up have engine light on with code po335 crank sensor circuit problem had sensor and pig tail connector replaced still have same problem around 2500 rpm engine brakes up engine...


P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction

The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

Symptoms:
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
* Vehicle may not start (see above)
* Vehicle may run rough or misfire
* MIL illumination

Causes: A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
* Damaged CKP sensor connector
* Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
* Sensor output open
* Sensor output shorted to ground
* Sensor output shorted to voltage
* Failed crank sensor
* Broken timing belt
* Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Test it and keep us updated.

Feb 05, 2011 | 2001 Chevrolet S-10

1 Answer

I was driving on the local streets and my car began to sputter and it would not speed up and it would stall,if i turn it off and started again, it still not speed up, some times it does not start up, if i...


I'm assumieng that you are talking about 2000 Nissan Altima... Are you check any OBD fault code there?

To me, sound like that either the fuel lines are cloged up and need to be replaced or cleaned out. Or it's your fuel filter that is dirty and needs to be replaced. I am almost certain that it's one of those things. I would first RE-CHECK the fuel filter and replace it before you replace the fuel lines as they would probably be more money to fix.

Few time ago, I heard about Nissan had a problem with their MAF (Mass Air Flow sensor), if when it is acting uo, disconnect the sensor, if run OK, then replace it.

The other possibility (that you comment us) is the Crankshaft Position sensor (CKP); this devices measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set, this is the reason because I suggtes scanned the PCM, to confirm this fault code stored there.

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
* Damaged CKP sensor connector
* Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
* Sensor output open
* Sensor output shorted to ground
* Sensor output shorted to voltage
* Failed crank sensor
* Broken timing belt
* Failed PCM

Note this possible solutions, if this wrong is present in your vehicle:
1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Good luck and keep us updated.

Nov 24, 2010 | 2000 Nissan Altima

2 Answers

Crankshaft Position Sensor Error P0335 recurred after r&r


In the kit there are two sensor that look identical. The one for the crankshaft has a white paint mark on it near the bolt hole. Make sure that it is in the right location.

Jul 25, 2009 | 2003 Nissan Altima

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