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Manual transmission transmission will shift into gear but will not engage on a manual hydraulic transmission.

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1 Answer

Std transmission won't engage any gear,the cables seem to be connected at both ends,is this a shift fork that is broken?


Auto or manual transmission
Check fluid level if auto.
Check clutch or adjustment if manual or clutch fluid level if hydraulic.

Mar 29, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

What causes Cts not to shift gears


You may have a bad shifting solenoid(automatic) low on transmission fluid,or your clutch isn't engaging ( manual)

Jun 28, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How do I fix my car having problems shifting into first gear?


I'm assuming that this is a manual transmission.
Old truck drivers trick...... Push in the clutch just as you try to put it into gear. If you do it too soon, it may make a grinding noise. Practice..... Thr trick is to have the transmission just barely rotating as you're grabbing the gear. Older vehicles can develop shifting issues as the synchro rings get worn. Pretend you're a trucker and feel the shift happen.

Mar 19, 2015 | 2009 Ford Focus SE

2 Answers

Why does my reverse gear grid on my 2000 Toyota


I take it you mean the transmission grinds when shifting into reverse with a manual transmission in which case the input shaft of the transmission is still partially engaged with the engine. One cause may be low fluid in the hydraulic clutch reservoir if it has a hydraulic clutch mechanism; use DOT-3 brake fluid and pump the clutch pedal a few times to remove any air. Another cause may be that the pilot bearing is hanging up; this is a major repair. Another possibility is that the clutch lining is coming loose or totally disintegrated requiring replacement.

Nov 17, 2014 | 2000 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

Manual transmission


The short answer, yes. M46 models with the type J or P overdrive (depending on year and market) require a certain level of oil in the overdrive. Additionally, the overdrive is a lot like a standard automatic transmission with one gear range in theory of operation. Therefore, the hydraulic properties of said transmission do come into play here, line pressure, shifting pressure, accumulator and piston function all work together to engage or disengage the unit. Always ensure the unit is disengaged before downshifting and of course, shifting into low reverse.

Feb 07, 2014 | 1988 Volvo 740

1 Answer

Vehicle dies when downshifting to first gear and also makes a squeling noise


Manual Transmission

  1. 1
    Park your car with its front tyres touching the curb. Engage 1st and start slowly releasing the clutch pedal without applying any throttle. The engine should gradually fade out and bog down when the pedal is completely released. If the engine just bogs down at some point, or the fading is not gradual, the clutch is damaged. If the gearbox grinds when you try to shift in first from a standstill, there's a damage in the clutch too.
    550px-find-out-if-a-transmission-has-gone-out-step-1.jpg


  2. 2
    Try to pull off in 3rd gear with the front wheels at the curb, and without applying throttle. If the engine doesn't die, it shows a complete clutch failure. In that case, do not drive this vehicle.
    550px-find-out-if-a-transmission-has-gone-out-step-2.jpg
  3. 3
    Find a smooth, straight road to test the vehicle. Start from first, and slowly accelerate from second. As you do this use late-shifting, i.e. slightly over-rev the engine (approx. 500-1000 RPM faster than the revs you'd normally shift at). Up-shift to second without using double-clutching. Repeat the same procedure when shifting into 3rd. Now, with your car running at approximately 50 km/h (25 mph) try down-shifting to second without double-clutching. Both the up-shifting and the down-shifting must be done without grinding. Grinding of the gears indicates a gearbox malfunction, most likely in the sync gears ("synchronizers"). To make sure it's the synchronizers, try up-shifting and down-shifting with double-clutching. If the grinding stops, then it's the synchronization.
    550px-find-out-if-a-transmission-has-gone-out-step-3.jpg
550px-find-out-if-a-transmission-has-gone-out-step-4.jpg
  • 2
    Shift into drive and hold the break pedal after making sure your brakes work. Press the gas pedal all the way down. The engine should not fade. If it does, it means the transmission (particularly the clutch) does not disengage completely.
    550px-find-out-if-a-transmission-has-gone-out-step-5.jpg
  • 3
    Check for smooth shifting. On an even and relatively horizontal road you should be able to accelerate without any tangible jolts. If there are such, the gearbox has malfunctioned.
    550px-find-out-if-a-transmission-has-gone-out-step-6.jpg
  • 4
    Check for vibrations. Driving at about 70 km/h (35 mph) switch to Neutral (both auto and manual). There shouldn't be any lateral vibrations. If there are, this is either due to a warping of the drive-shaft, or a suspension damage. Basically, drive-shaft warping is perceived as a vibration in both vertical and horizontal direction, whereas a suspension damage is felt as a vibration in only one direction (i.e. either horizontally or vertically).
    550px-find-out-if-a-transmission-has-gone-out-step-7.jpg
  • 5
    Test steering. When trying to enter a corner with approximately 30 km/h (15 mph) there shouldn't be any tangible under-steer. The presence of such may be due to a differential failure, especially in FWD cars. Novice drivers must never try and test their differentials by trying to induce under/over-steer!
    550px-find-out-if-a-transmission-has-gone-out-step-8.jpg
  • EditTips for preventing transmission damages

    • Avoid prolonged driving by slipping the clutch.
    • Avoid jerks and jolts while driving.
    • Avoid "riding the clutch", i.e. needlessly keeping your foot on the clutch pedal.
    • Never use clutch slipping for regulating the speed of a heavy truck!
    • Make sure the clutch of a manual transmission is fully pressed when shifting
    • Do not use excessive force when shifting a manual.
    • For rear wheel drive (RWD) vehicles, avoid driving through places at the minimum of the vehicle's clearance.
    EditTips

    • Incomplete disengaging is due to the trailing disc sticking to the leading one, e.g. because of mechanical soiling of the friction surfaces or worn out springs.
    • Incomplete disengaging in automatic transmissions is felt as a forward jolt when the gearbox changes gears, whereas incomplete engaging is felt as over-revving the engine without any significant change in speed, especially when stepping on the throttle at high speeds (over 50 km/h or 30 mph).
    • Automatic transmissions have the so-called "hydraulic clutch". It's basically a combination of a hydraulic pump, driven by the engine, and a hydraulic motor, linked to the rest of the drive-train. This allows for the hydraulic liquid to flow through the motor, even if its load is too big for the engine to rotate it. This eases operation, but results in poorer acceleration, greater fuel consumption and severely decreased ability of the driver to use engine braking, which can be very dangerous on long downward slopes. Hydraulic clutches are easier to operate in urban driving, but become a drawback on long roads
    • Gearboxes come in three types: manual, semi-automatic, and automatic
    • Malfunctions in a hydraulic clutch include incomplete disengaging (due to old hydraulic fluid, which has become thicker than specified by the manufacturer), or incomplete engaging (most often due to a leak of hydraulic fluid or presence of an air pocket within the hydraulic circuit. These are both dealt with by replacing the hydraulic fluid, bleeding (if necessary) of the hydraulic system, and removing any possible leaks.
    • The most common malfunction of a dispatch box is the inability to change its function (e.g. switch between 4x2 and 4x4) If this happens, refer to a repair shop.
    • The clutch is designed to smoothly disconnect the engine from the rest of the drive-train.
    • The clutch disengaging too low or too high is an indication of a worn out trailing disc.
    • There are implements that allow an automatic gearbox to operate in semi-automatic mode, allowing the driver to manually shift gear up or gear down, but w/o using a clutch. These operate exclusively by aids of electronics. This is common in high-class German cars like the S-Klasse Mercedes. Usually the corresponding position of the lever is marked with T or M and the driver selects a gear down by moving the lever to the left, and a gear up by nudging it do the right.
    • Semi-automatic gearboxes are combined with a hydraulic clutch. They allow the driver to select a gear up or a gear down. These are most often seen in rally cars, where there are two levers on both sides of the steering wheel. Usually the right one switches a gear up, and the left one switches a gear down.

    Aug 23, 2013 | 1995 Suzuki Sidekick

    1 Answer

    Manual transmission will not shift with engine running but will with engine off


    The reason is that the gears are turn with the engine running, like the clutch is not disengaged. So that is what you need to look at. the clutch or clutch pedal linkage/ hydraulic system. One of these is not letting the transmission slow down enough to engage a gear.

    Jun 28, 2011 | 1993 Toyota Celica

    1 Answer

    1998 dodge dakota 5.2L V8, I have 2nd and 3rd gear only with automatic transmission.


    In the 1998 Dodge Dakota 5.2L V8 if you have only 2nd and 3rd gear with the auto transmission, the solenoid inside for shifting down to 1st gear is not functioning correctly.

    A complete transmission rebuild is indicated in this situation, where all of the clutches and solenoids that are bad are replaced.

    This involves tearing down the transmission after removing it from the vehicle, and; rebuilding it from the ground up.

    Try to find a local transmission repair shop where they are certified to do this kind of work.
    ----
    A basic description of the problem follows:
    Servos/Accumulators The servos are hydraulic pistons and cylinders. They resemble the hydraulic actuators used on many other machines, such as bulldozers. Hydraulic fluid enters the cylinder, under pressure, and forces the piston to move to engage the band or clutches.
    Servo operation tccs7015.gif

    The accumulators are used to cushion the engagement of the servos. The transmission fluid must pass through the accumulator on the way to the servo. The accumulator housing contains a thin piston, which is sprung away from the discharge passage of the accumulator. When fluid passes through the accumulator on the way to the servo, it must move the piston against spring pressure, and this action smoothes out the action of the servo.
    Hydraulic Control System The hydraulic pressure used to operate the servos comes from the main transmission oil pump. This fluid is channeled to the various servos through the shift valves. There is generally a manual shift valve, which is operated by the transmission selector lever, and a shift valve for each up shift the transmission provides.
    Most automatic transmissions are electronically controlled; electrical solenoids are used to control the hydraulic fluid. The shift solenoids are regulated by an electronic control module. Shift timing is regulated through sensor feedback information provided to the electronic controller.
    On older transmissions there are two pressures that control the shift valves. One is the governor pressure which is affected by vehicle speed. The other is the modulator pressure which is affected by intake manifold vacuum or throttle position. Governor pressure rises with an increase in vehicle speed, and modulator pressure rises as the throttle is opened wider. By responding to these two pressures, the shift valves cause the up shift points to be delayed with increased throttle opening to make the best use of the engine's power output.
    Older transmissions also make use of an auxiliary circuit for downshifting. This circuit may be actuated by the throttle linkage, vacuum that actuates the modulator, or by a cable or solenoid. It applies pressure to the downshift surface on the shift valve or valves.
    The transmission modulator also governs the line pressure, used to actuate the servos. In this way, the clutches and bands will be actuated with a force matching the torque output of the engine.
    prev.gif next.gif

    Aug 17, 2010 | 1998 Dodge Dakota

    1 Answer

    03 dodge caravan, 105,000 miles, 2.4L transmission will shift in all gears but will not go into overdrive from 3rd gear. when it does shift to overdrive i try to speed up on the gas and it shifts back into...


    I'm afraid that the transmission's O/D solenoid malfunctioning or kick down cable may be misadjusted if so equipped.

    looking at a rebuilt transmission if you plan to keep the Caravan.

    Or, alternatively, could get a low mileage transmission from a salvage yard and have it installed.

    ----
    Servos/Accumulators The servos are hydraulic pistons and cylinders. They resemble the hydraulic actuators used on many other machines, such as bulldozers. Hydraulic fluid enters the cylinder, under pressure, and forces the piston to move to engage the band or clutches.
    Servo operation tccs7015.gif

    The accumulators are used to cushion the engagement of the servos. The transmission fluid must pass through the accumulator on the way to the servo. The accumulator housing contains a thin piston, which is sprung away from the discharge passage of the accumulator. When fluid passes through the accumulator on the way to the servo, it must move the piston against spring pressure, and this action smoothes out the action of the servo.
    Hydraulic Control System The hydraulic pressure used to operate the servos comes from the main transmission oil pump. This fluid is channeled to the various servos through the shift valves. There is generally a manual shift valve, which is operated by the transmission selector lever, and a shift valve for each up shift the transmission provides.
    Most automatic transmissions are electronically controlled; electrical solenoids are used to control the hydraulic fluid. The shift solenoids are regulated by an electronic control module. Shift timing is regulated through sensor feedback information provided to the electronic controller.
    On older transmissions there are two pressures that control the shift valves. One is the governor pressure which is affected by vehicle speed. The other is the modulator pressure which is affected by intake manifold vacuum or throttle position. Governor pressure rises with an increase in vehicle speed, and modulator pressure rises as the throttle is opened wider. By responding to these two pressures, the shift valves cause the up shift points to be delayed with increased throttle opening to make the best use of the engine's power output.
    Older transmissions also make use of an auxiliary circuit for downshifting. This circuit may be actuated by the throttle linkage, vacuum that actuates the modulator, or by a cable or solenoid. It applies pressure to the downshift surface on the shift valve or valves.
    The transmission modulator also governs the line pressure, used to actuate the servos. In this way, the clutches and bands will be actuated with a force matching the torque output of the engine.
    prev.gif next.gif

    Aug 09, 2010 | 2003 Dodge Caravan

    3 Answers

    Reverse wont work properly, sometimes have to pull hard


    The transmission type wasn't specified as to manual or automatic,as both were available on 91-96 Stealth's,but from the complaint,i presume manual trans.If it is the manual trans,5th gear and Reverse gear are usually on the same shift rail.So part of the diagnosis is to pay attention to 5th gear for any problems.Another part of the diagnosis is the clutch pedal and hydraulics that activate the clutch.When the problem is happening,try this:pump the clutch pedal rapidly,and repeatedly,then try to engage Reverse.If it goes right into Reverse,then the clutch hydraulic system needs to be inspected.Good luck.

    Jul 25, 2008 | 1995 Dodge Neon

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