Question about 2004 Chevrolet TrailBlazer

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Lose of fluid pressure @ rear calipers after changing caliper & brakes

I changed the brakes on the back and discovered a caliper that was stuck and wouldn't press back down so I changed the caliper for a new one and now I have little to no fluid pressure going to my rear wheels

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You need to bleed the brakes after you change any component containing brake fluid.

Posted on Mar 21, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Changed rear caliper on 98 blazer and now have no

Hi,
Have someone pump the brake pedal and hold foot pressure it. Loosen the bleeder screw and air or fluid should shoot out... it's under pressure. Tell the person to not lift up on the pedal until you tighten the bleeder, or they'll draw air back into the line. They'll feel the pedal go down to the floor. Keep applying pedal pressure till the bleeder is tightened. Repeat the process till all air is out. They will have a "good pedal" shortly.
Do each wheel, and remember to refill the master cylinder as you lose fluid.
Hope this helps... Good luck!

Posted on Oct 16, 2009

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I replaced front pads on my 2000 crown vic. The caliper is stuck on the passenger side .i bleed the brakes an it was fine befor i changed the pads is the caliper shot ???


If the brake fluid has NOT been changed on any vehicle
every 2 years since it was new, you can be assured that after
10 years ,the inside of the calipers are all rust

Replace the calipers & the rubber flex hoses, as they collapse
inside also.

You MUST remove ALL Rust from any surface the pads or calipers slide on & use anti-seize on those surfaces

You must remove all rust from wheel hub face,both side of the rotor & mounting face of the wheels & lube them also

You have to remove & clean the caliper slide pins/bolts & use
the synthetic caliper lube inside there

Need a helper to bleed the brakes & have to start at the back
& do all 4 corners

Nov 14, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2005 Chevy Equinox left front brake caliper locks up


Your vehicle should have rear drum brakes...They have to be adjusted manually for correct adjustment...People say they self adjust but it is not good enough....by adjusting the rear it will decrease the pressure on the front and deliver equal braking...This will help eliminate caliper pressure overload....I'm not saying that is your caliper problem but it is insult to injury and will save the life of front brakes.....Now your caliper problem..FYI..A rule of thumb is anytime you change a caliper you should always replace both calipers to have identical braking pressure".The same with brake hoses and rear wheel cylinders.....The caliper that froze in the first place got hot and boiled the brake fluid and quite possibly partially collapsed the caliper brake line/hose inside as Clint and Frank stated....I am going to guess that the first caliper froze under normal conditions however got hot enough to internally damage the caliper line/hose...Then you may think of the pressure regulator being bad in which case could be a problem......So this is what you do".Since we know the left front caliper line/hose has been exposed to heat it needs to be replaced anyway...also the fluid was boiled and it needs to be changed / bled...The new caliper that froze should be ok unless it was bad off the shelf which is rare but possible."..Change the line/hose,bleed the brake system and let the mechanic test drive before you pay and leave..The mechanic will know before driving if the new caliper that froze is bad or not by rotating the wheel...This is the cheapest way...And you will know if the pressure regulator is bad or not just by bleeding system........I hope this helps....."Brooks/Metalpoet....."....

Jun 13, 2014 | 2005 Chevrolet Equinox

1 Answer

Brake


There are several problems. Your caliper could be stuck and that is a problem. You probably have a rubber brake hose that is clogged up internally and restricting the flow of fluid, a second problem.
The internal rubber hose can form flaps which close off the flow of fluid. You only have pressure in 1 direction so it is easier to have a stuck caliper because the fluid will trap in the caliper and refuse to return to the Master cylinder.
But this must really be blocked or the safety valve has shut off the diagonal lockout for the ABS. For safety when fluid pressure is lost, a valve shifts and tries to keep a front and a rear brake diagonally supplied with fluid.
What you need to try before giving up on the current project is bleed your brakes starting from the longest rear line and work your way forward with the last line being the shortest.
You may discover that you now have fluid bleeding from the problem caliper. If so, part of the problem was the safety valve killed the fluid flow. You still have a bad rubber line, and possibly a stuck caliper, but now you may have fluid flow.
If I were you, I would buy a rubber brake line and change it before bleeding the system. Then you can see if the caliper is working or not. Rubber lines are cheap compared to most parts.
By bleeding the lines as I recommend, you stand a chance of centering the safety valve and solving part of your problems. If a rear line diagonal to the problem front caliper is also dry, then the safety valve was tripped.
With the rubber brake line removed, you should be able to compress the problem caliper with ease; if not, it is stuck and should be replaced.
At this point, I should mention the ABS box. Pressure coming from the box can be measured as well as Master cylinder pressure going to the box. Hydraulic gauges would be necessary. It would be the final explanation to your problems should the easier solutions fail. Testing price versus component price should be considered.
You will restore fluid flow and be able to test your stuck caliper using what I gave you.

Jun 02, 2013 | 1998 Mercury Mystique

1 Answer

2001 Silverado 2500 HD Why Rear brakes don't work after I installed new hydro-boost power booster, master cylinder, calipers, and pads. I bled master cylinder before installing, and brakes beginn


Hello Patricia,

Have you checked the master brake cylinder reservoir for brake fluid loss?

I don't suspect the master cylinder as you have replaced it... but am more suspect of a leaking brake line or fitting which should have
been discovered when you had the system bled.

The only time I ever had a rear brake problem with a 2500 series Chevrolet was due to seized rear brake caliper guide pins...as your calipers are also new that is not your problem.

If your brake pedal feels spongy and travels to the floor board you have air in the system, a brake fluid leak or a failure in the power steering system, such as a broken hose, broken power steering pump drive belt, or failed pump, would result in a loss of pressure to both the hydro-boost and steering.

Find more information here:

. Hydro Boost Power Assist Systems Operation Diagnosis and Repair

Jul 23, 2017 | 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD

1 Answer

I HAVE REPLACED THE RIGHT REAR CALIPER ON MY 94 LINCILN CONTINENTAL 5 TIMES IN THE PAST COUPLE OF DAYS. THE SEALS INSIDE THE CALIPER ARE BUSTING EVERY TIME I GO TO BLEED THE SYSTEM AFTER INSTALLATION. ...


Never change a caliper without changing the brake hose. I changed a 94 lincoln Continental rear caliper 3 times before discovering the brake hose had internally collapsed. Chaged it out, solved problem immediately. Your problem sounds a little different however... Mine, the rear caliper would not release.

May 12, 2011 | 1994 Lincoln Continental

2 Answers

Rear passenger brake is hanging up any ideas


Do you have drum or disc rear brakes? If drum, the wheel cylinder probably needs to be replaced. If the wheel has overheated at any time, you should also replace the hardware (springs, etc) as they can lose their ability to retract the shoes if overheated. If disc brakes on rear, then the caliper is probably to blame. Has the brake fluid ever been changed? Fluid absorbs moisture (never use brake fluid from an open or not tightly sealed container). After rebuilding or replacing the caliper or wheel cyl. bleed all 4 wheels to flush out old fluid, otherwise you may have other wheels w/ brakes dragging/not releasing. Let me know if this doesn't fix it, I'll help further.

Mar 28, 2010 | 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

How to collapse rear calipers on mini cooper


Did you notice the brake fluid level in the master cylinder before you tried to collapse the calipers? You should see a rise in level as you collapse them (however far they did collapse). If you're not seeing any change in the level (it should fill up) you might have a plugged valve between the caliper and the master cylinder. Loosen the brake fluid line to the caliper and try collapsing it again. If still no go, start dismantling the caliper and look for bent, broken, stuck or mal-adjusted pieces.

Feb 07, 2010 | 2005 Mini Cooper

1 Answer

Changed rear caliper on 98 blazer and now have no brake pressue at either rear wheel? Did before I changed calipers. Tried to bleed the brakes but get very little fluid out and it is slow, no pressure?


Hi,
Have someone pump the brake pedal and hold foot pressure it. Loosen the bleeder screw and air or fluid should shoot out... it's under pressure. Tell the person to not lift up on the pedal until you tighten the bleeder, or they'll draw air back into the line. They'll feel the pedal go down to the floor. Keep applying pedal pressure till the bleeder is tightened. Repeat the process till all air is out. They will have a "good pedal" shortly.
Do each wheel, and remember to refill the master cylinder as you lose fluid.
Hope this helps... Good luck!

Oct 16, 2009 | 1997 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup

1 Answer

Changing 4 calipers and there is no oil com out when try to bleed


The master cylinder supplies the pressure to the brake fluid that travels between the maste brake cylinder resevoir and the brake caliper pistons (through the brake lines. If the master cylinder fails there will be insufficient compression of the brake fluid to make the calipers operate as designed. Leaks in the brake lines and/or cylinders is a possibility, and unrelated to functionality of the master cylinder. Also, pistons located in the brake calipers can form a corrosion ring on their inside walls if there is breakdown in the brake fluid or moisture that gets into the lines. Operating the vehicle when there is insufficient brake fluid in the master cylinder resevoir can also lead to air getting into the brake lines, causing bad working brakes. Air compresses more than brake fluid, and the master cylinder isn't designed to compress air in the brake lines. Sounds like a bad case of "lack of maintenance", as opposed to bad advice from the mechanics. That said, there's no excuse for bad installation. But, it's tough to improperly install a brake line since they are nothing more than hollow metal tubes. There should be no rubber connectors installed in the brake lines. When bleeding the brake lines one must remove all of the trapped air before you will see any fluid appear. If the valves in the master cylinder are not properly operating the master cylinder will not allow the brake fluid to get into the brake lines.

Hope this helps.

Jun 13, 2009 | 1999 Volkswagen Passat

1 Answer

Jeep Commander Rear Brake Pad Installation


Per Chilton Auto repair manual:

Removal & Installation
  1. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  2. Remove the rear wheel.
  3. Siphon a small amount of brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir.
  4. Insert a small prybar through the caliper opening and pry the caliper cover (using the outboard brake pad) to bottom the piston in the caliper bore.
  5. Remove the caliper slide bolts.
  6. Remove the caliper from the anchor.

    WARNING Support the brake caliper with mechanics wire. Do not let the caliper hang by the brake hose.
  7. Remove the brake pads from the caliper.
To install:
  1. Install the brake pads onto the caliper.
  2. Lubricate the slide pin bolts with grease provided with the brake pads, or suitable silicon grease equivalent.
  3. Install the caliper on the anchor and tighten the slide pin bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm).
  4. Install the rear wheel.
  5. Lower the vehicle.
  6. Pump the brake pedal several times until a firm pedal is obtained in order to properly seat the pads.
  7. Refill the brake fluid reservoir to the proper level.

May 17, 2009 | 2006 Jeep Commander

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