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Fan sensors Fan does not work making the car to over heat

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Zafira radiator fan


Turning on the heat removes heat from the engine as it blows it on you. Make sure first that there are no air pockets in your cooling system as that can cause high temp reading and malfunctions in proper fan engagement. If that looks good test your fan, if it is working then test the fan relay, if it is working test the temperature sensor that gives the relay the go ahead to engage the fan.

Jan 16, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Where is the fan sensor located on a 2001 Saturn? Mine needs to be replaced and wanting to do it myself


when you say fan sensor-are you talking about the radiator fan or the blower for the heating and cooling system?-Denny

Nov 08, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cooling fans not running


HI. I have a very thorough, step by step procedure that will help troubleshoot this issue. follow carefully, to isolate the problem, Use extreme caution when preforming this inspection procedure.



1.Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.


2.Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.


3.Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.


4.Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.


5.Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.


6.Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.


7.Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Aug 24, 2010 | 2000 Toyota Sienna

1 Answer

Cooling fan is not working


HI. I have a very thorough, step by step procedure that will help troubleshoot this issue. follow carefully, to isolate the problem, Use extreme caution when preforming this inspection procedure.


Step1
Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.

Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.

Step3

Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.

Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.

Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.

Step6

Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.

Step7

Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Nov 05, 2009 | 2001 Volkswagen Beetle

1 Answer

Cooling fan is not coming on . the fuse is intact.


HI. Here is a step by step troubleshooting guide that will help you isolate the issue. use caution, and follow carefully.

Step1
Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.
Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.
Step3
Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.
Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.
Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.
Step6
Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.
Step7
Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Oct 21, 2009 | 1991 Honda Civic

1 Answer

2003 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER AWD, THE RAD. FANS DON'T COME ON WHEN THEY SHOULD. I HAVE PUT NEW CONTROL MUDULE, TEMP. SENDING UNIT, THERMOSTAT AND THEY STILL DON'T WORK. WHEN THE CAR IS RUNNING AND I TAP ON...


Use this thorough testing procedure to troubleshoot this issue.

Step1
Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.
Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.
Step3
Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.
Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.
Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.
Step6
Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.
Step7
Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Aug 27, 2009 | 2003 Mitsubishi Outlander

2 Answers

FAN PROBLEM OR SENSOR?


i believe you have a sensor problem best way is to replace the sensor but you can bypass it it will automatically make the fan come on when you bypass the sensor

Jun 06, 2009 | 1999 Plymouth Grand Voyager

2 Answers

Cooling fan cuts off


The fan relay is not functioning correctly or the new sensor is defective.

Jun 02, 2009 | 1995 Ford Mustang

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