Question about Kia Sedona

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Coolant leak front engine

Leaking from under the radiator cap a tube that looks like a lil fan, what is this?

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  • Kia Expert
  • 341 Answers

Your description doesn't help much, but going on where I have found leaks in the past, the main place is the pipework that goes from more or less where you describe and goes under the car all the way to the rear heater. These pipes do rot and leak. I have lost count of how many Sedona's I have seen with the rear heater pipes looped out to stop leaks. You just need to dry all around where you think the leak is and watch carefully for water leaking. unless you give a better description I cant help you further, sorry

Posted on Feb 02, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: 1995 ford ranger coolant leak

frost plugs on the side of the block or something that you installed may have not sealed. can happen know the drill.

Posted on Feb 16, 2009

sledge1863
  • 149 Answers

SOURCE: Leaking coolant

Highly unlikely that is the case more likely it is the radiator leaking onto the fan. Also check the upper hose to make sure that it doesnt have a pin hole in it. Good luck and dont forget to rate.

Posted on Mar 26, 2009

  • 312 Answers

SOURCE: coolant leaking replace every three days coolant fan wont stop ru

This link has a diagram showing the location of the relay: http://autorepair.about.com/library/faqs/bl581g.htm

The Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) radiator cooling fan relay is located behind the front bumper fascia below the right head lamp.

Posted on Sep 08, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: My 04 grand prix is leaking coolant. It was first

I had the same problem.The leak was from the block heater.I did not notice any leaks on the ground,but was always low on anti freeze.The block heater came apart on the highway and blew all the fluid out of the car,luckly i shut the car off and had it towed to the shop.They replaced the block heater with a rubber frost plug to get me back on the road.Have your block heater checked,they maybe your problem has well.

Posted on Jan 24, 2010

01fordeb
  • 1033 Answers

SOURCE: Have 2002 Ford Escape, Where's the Radiator Cap??

This is where you fluid goes. If I were you, I would stay away from those sealants. But yes you can put the sealant in the reserve, but it;s best if you drain half the water out, pour in coolant and then re-fill. This gives it a better chance to flow throughout the system. Sometimes these sealants can cause more harm than good in the long run.

Posted on Apr 26, 2010

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1 Answer

2004 Kia Sedona coolant leak front engine on driver side, leaking from under the radiator cap a tube that looks like a lil fan, what is this?


Its the hot water return pipe..but "lil fan"??
Try a new radiator cap..cheaper than a new radiator! Get one from the scrap yard guy first

Mar 18, 2014 | Kia Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

It is over heating . there are no leaks the type of clutch fan is thermal but i do not know if that is the correct one or not? it has a new thermostat,and new anti-freeze, water pump is the same when...


Physically look in the radiator under the cap for coolant level, and check the valve in the cap for sticking. If air is present in the radiator it can't get out, and more coolant can't get in,(from the overflow). Either clean the cap or replace it and check that it is the CORRECT cap.
Radiator fins dirty, clean with a strong stream of water, not high pressure water.
Radiator clogged, have it boiled out, or replace.
Thermostat stuck open or shut, replace it.
Water pump worn out, can no longer move enough coolant, replace it.
Fan shroud broken or missing....
Electric Fan(s) not working, Check the fan, relay, fuse and engine temperature sensor's.
Belt driven fan, belt slipping, fan clutch is bad, fan blades have flattened out.

Air dam under front bumper is gone, loose, or broken. It actually has a purpose other than scraping on the driveway or curbs. It forces air up into and thru the condenser and radiator. If it

Aug 17, 2011 | 1997 Kia Sportage

1 Answer

Leaking coolant but cant find the leak?checked the radiator and pipes but still cant find it!could it be something to do with the air con unit? only leaks when started and will drain the water out of the...


There is absolutely no way possible that the air con unit is going to cause an engine coolant "leak". The air conditioner can cause the engine to overheat if the fans are not working properly, but you will see coolant coming out of the radiator cap if it is overheating.

To find a coolant leak you just have to look for it while it is leaking. If you can see it dripping out on the ground, then you should be able to follow it up to see where it is coming from. Cracks in the plastic radiator tanks are common in all Honda vehicles. These cracks can have the characteristic of only leaking after reaching a certain temperature. You will probably have to remove the plastic shrouding from under the vehicle to see many of the leaks that can be coming from the front radiator area.

Water pumps can also leak at only certain temperatures. Sometimes they can fool you also because there are channels on the back of the pump that will direct coolant away from the water pump/ timing belt area in the event of a leak. It can look like it is leaking from the side of the engine that is away from the water pump. Again, you have to LOOK to see where it is originating from.

Apr 28, 2011 | 1990 Honda Civic

2 Answers

Looking for the fill plug on a 200 dodge darango 4 wheel drive front punkin all i see is a vent pipe


COOLANT-ADDING ADDITIONAL
Do not remove radiator cap to add coolant to system. When adding coolant to maintain correct level, do so at coolant reserve/overflow tank. Use a 50/50 mixture of ethylene glycol antifreeze containing Alugard 340-2 y and low mineral content water.
Remove radiator cap only for testing or when refilling system after service. Removing cap unnecessarily can cause loss of coolant and allow air to enter system, which produces corrosion.

COOLANT LEVEL CHECK
The cooling system is closed and designed to maintain coolant level to top of radiator.
WARNING: DO NOT OPEN RADIATOR DRAINCOCK WITH ENGINE RUNNING OR WHILE ENGINE IS HOT AND COOLING SYSTEM IS UNDER PRESSURE.
Remove radiator cap. The coolant level should be to top of radiator. If not, and if coolant level in coolant recovery bottle is at ADD mark, check for:
  • An air leak in coolant reserve/overflow tank or its hose
  • An air leak in radiator filler neck
  • Leak in pressure cap seal to radiator filler neck
TRANSMISSION and OIL LEVEL CHECK TUBES
pctech1_27.jpg

Mar 04, 2011 | 2000 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

Car overheated and lost all power. how do I get it to start?


ENGINE NOT GOING TO START IF GET TOO HOT FIRST THING I WOULD REPLACE THERMOSTAT AND RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP THEN ADD COOLANT UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL CORRECT THATS WHEN THERMOSTAT OPEN UP AND TOP HOSE HOT.CHECK FOR LEAKING RADIATOR HOSES CHECK TOP RADIATOR HOSE CHECK BOTTOM RADIATOR HOSE.CHECK FOR LEAKS AROUND THE RADIATOR LOOK DOWN BELOW COOLANTS FANS CHECK FOR LEAKS AT RADIATOR CORES OR LEAKS AT THE RADIATOR PLASTIC SIDE CONTAINERS. CHECK FOR LEAKS AT WATER PUMP WEEP HOLE AND CHECK FOR LEAKS AT THE HEATER HOSES AROUND ENGINE BLOCK TO THE HEATER CORE HOSES. THERE IS A REASON CAR OVERHEAT.IF CAR OVERHEAT WHILE DRIVING YOU HAVE FAULTY THERMOSTAT OR LEAKING OUT COOLANT OR BLOWN HEAD GASKET.IF ENGINE OVER HEAT WHILE SITTING DURING A LONG IDLING PERIOD.YOU COULD HAVE FAULTY COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR OR FAULTY COOLING FAN FUSE OR RELAY.HOT WIRE COOLANT TO SEE IF IT RUNS IF NO REPLACE FAN MOTOR. IF YES FAN MOTOR COULD HAVE FAULTY WIRE OR PCM FAILURE. CHECK ENGINE CRANKCASE IF OIL LOOKS LIKE MILK SHAKE ENGINE HEAD GASKET LEAKING.

Nov 26, 2010 | 2002 Mitsubishi Galant

2 Answers

My 1996 olds. aurora keeps over heating. I can just put coolant in the radiator and seconds after I start the engine, I get a low coolant reading in the information display. In addition, it spits...


Hello,

There are several problems that could be leading to an engine overheating. I will discuss some of them and you can try to act on which solutions that can help.

THERMOSTAT STUCK SHOT The thermostat, which is usually located in a housing where the upper radiator hose connects to the engine, controls the operating temperature of the engine. It does this by blocking the flow of coolant from the engine to the radiator until the engine reaches a certain temperature (usually 190 to 195 degrees F.). When this temperature is reached, the thermostat opens and allows coolant to circulate from the engine to the radiator.
If the thermostat fails to open, which can happen due to mechanical failure or if a steam pocket forms under the thermostat due to incomplete filling of the cooling system or coolant loss, no coolant will circulate between the engine and radiator, and the engine will quickly overheat.
You can check for this condition by carefully touching the upper radiator hose when the engine is first started and is warming up. If the upper radiator hose does not become hot to the touch within several minutes after starting the engine, it means the thermostat is probably defective and needs to be replaced.
CAUTION: The replacement thermostat should always have the same temperature rating as the original. Do not substitute a colder or hotter thermostat on any vehicle that has computerized engine controls as engine operating temperature affects the operation of the fuel, ignition and emissions control systems.


DEFECTIVE FAN CLUTCH
On rear wheel drive vehicles with belt-driven cooling fan, a "fan clutch" is often used to improve fuel economy. The clutch is a viscous-coupling filled with silicone oil. The clutch allows the fan to slip at high speed, which reduces the parasitic horsepower drag on the engine. If the clutch slips too much, however, the fan may not turn fast enough to keep the engine cool.
The silicone fluid inside the clutch breaks down over time and can leak out due to wear, too. If you see oily streaks radiating outward on the clutch (and/or the fan can be spun by hand with little or no resistance when the engine is off), it means the clutch is bad and needs to be replaced. Any play or wobble in the fan due to wear in the clutch also signals the need for a new clutch.


EXTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS

Leaks in radiator or heater hoses, the water pump, radiator, heater core or engine freeze plugs can allow coolant to escape. No engine can tolerate the loss of coolant for very long, so it usually overheats as soon as a leak develops.
A visual inspection of the cooling system and engine will usually reveal where the coolant is going.
Leaks in hoses can only be fixed by replacing the hose. Leaks in the water pump also require replacing the pump. But leaks in a radiator, heater hose or freeze plug may sometimes respond to a sealer added to the cooling system.


WEAK OR LEAKY RADIATOR CAP
If no leaks are apparent, the radiator cap should be pressure tested to make sure it is holding the specified pressure. If the spring inside the cap is weak (or the cap is the wrong one for the application), the engine will lose coolant out the overflow tube every time it gets hot.

INTERNAL COOLANT LEAK
If there are no visible coolant leaks, but the engine is using coolant, there may be a crack in the cylinder head or block, or a leaky head gasket that is allowing coolant to escape into the combustion chamber or crankcase.

EXHAUST RESTRICTION
In some instances a severe exhaust restriction can produce enough backpressure to cause an engine to overheat. The most likely cause of the blockage would be a plugged catalytic converter or a crushed or damaged pipe. Checking intake vacuum and/or exhaust backpressure can diagnose this kind of problem.

BAD WATER PUMP
In a high mileage engine, the impeller that pumps the coolant through the engine inside the water pump may be so badly corroded that the blades are loose or eaten away. If such is the case, the pump must be replaced. Most pump failures, however, occur at the pump shaft bearing and seal. After tens of thousands of miles of operation, the bearing and seal wear out. Coolant starts to leak out past the shaft seal, which may cause the engine to overheat due to the loss of coolant. A sealer additive will not stop this kind of leak. Replacing the water pump is the only cure.
CAUTION: A leaky water pump should be replaced without delay, not only to reduce the risk of engine overheating but to prevent catastrophic pump failure. If the shaft breaks on a rear-wheel drive vehicle, the fan may go forward and chew into the radiator ruining the radiator.


INOPERATIVE FAN MOTOR
On most front-wheel drive cars, the fan that cools the radiator is driven by an electric motor. A temperature switch or coolant sensor on the engine cycles the fan on and off as additional cooling is needed. If the temperature switch or coolant sensor (or the relay that routes power to the fan motor is bad), the fan won't come on when it is needed and the engine will overheat. Likewise, if the fan motor itself is bad, the fan won't work.
The system needs to be diagnosed to determine where the problem is so the correct component can be replaced.

Also check if you are not having a blockage in the coolants hose.

Take care and good luck

Oct 26, 2010 | 1996 Oldsmobile Aurora

1 Answer

Overheating


CHANGE THERMOSTAT AND RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP.CHECK COOLANT LEVEL.MAKE SURE YOU HAVE 50/50 ANTIFREEZE AND WATER.MAKE SURE COOLING FANS COMING ON WHEN ENGINE REACHES 190 DEGREES.TO SEE IF COOLANT FANS RUNNING TURN ON CAR AIR CONDITIONER TO SEE IF FANS RUN IF NOT CHECK COOLING FANS FUSES.IF FUSES GOOD I AM LOOKING AT A FAULTY COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR.IF ALL IS GOOD.NO LEAKS AT RADIATOR HOSES + HEATERS HOSES. NO LEAKS AT WATER PUMP WEEP HOLE OR GASKET.NO LEAKS AT RADIATOR.LAST RESORT CHECK ENGINE OIL. IF LOOKS LIKE MILK SHAKE YOU HAVE LEAKING HEAD GASKET.THAT WILL CAUSE ENGINE OVERHEATING.

Jun 23, 2010 | 2000 Cadillac Seville

3 Answers

Water leak -- 2000 Ford Windstar


Look for tell tale signs under the bonnet such as brown trails. Do you find water loss when the car is standing still unused or only after having used it. Be methodical, the coolant follows a pretty basic circuits: Primary: engine, thermostat housing, top radiator hose, radiator, radiator bottom hose, water pump (has the drive/fan belt running around its pulley) Secondary: engine rear top pipe, heater matrix for the cabin, return pipe to heater solenoid valve ( allows water to circulate to the heater matrix when you demand heat inside the car), return pipe to the water pump. If you find there is water loss irrespective as to the use of the car the fault should be easy to trace because it means that obvious drips should be forming or puddles created in the car. Note that many leaks in the coolant system only begin to show themselves when the engine is hot. The reason for this is that the coolant system in creases in pressure Checks 1) the coolant filler cap is on securely and that it has a good seal - if this leaks the coolant system fails to pressurize and the engine heat will evaporate the coolant or even steam off. 2) The water/coolant pump is common to both circuits and is worked hard. I always start here; if nothing else just to rule it out as it is a fairly expensive part to replace and the replacement procedure is involved. Check the interior of the engine bay for any sign of splash stains on a line perpendicular to the fan blade rotation. If the front seal on the water pump is leaking it dribbles water onto the pump pulley. When the engine is running this water is spread around in an arc like a garden sprinkler by the pulley and fan rotation. If no apparent engine bay stains are apparent look at the 'chin' of the pump for a vertical drip stain. A slow leak here can occur when the engine is running but the heat of the engine causes almost instantaneous evaporation of the evidence. During engine 'warm up' the water leak will leave evidence of itself as a vertical line of brown running down from the pump centre. 3) Having ruled out the pump another quick check, open the oil filler cap. An abundance of 'mayonnaise' on the underside of the cap and around the entrance to the oil filler means an internal water leak and this will require a cylinder head gasket renewal. ouch! 4) Check the radiator for stains front and back, even a tiny pin hole will leave evidence. 5) check that all the hoses are good and that there are no leaks where they are attach and that all jubilee clips are tight and intact. 6) Check the foot-wells of the car for wet carpets - a sure sign that either the heater matrix or the tubes attached to it are leaking behind the dash board is a soggy carpet. Dab a paper kitchen towel to the dashboard under side to locate the leak 7) Again check all the hoses and connections thereof for leaks. 8) Now a final check. The engine must be cold before you start this!!! Remove the coolant filler cap and top up the coolant to the normal level. Start the engine. Does the water in the coolant filler tank behave really violently and try to bubble out of the filler entrance. If so there is leak into one of the cylinders. This is frequently accompanied by very thick white exhaust gases as a result of steam and burnt glycol antifreeze. The only fix here is to renew the head gasket. If there is still no sign go over the list again but more thoroughly.. the water has to getting out somewhere. If all else fails take it to your garage and have them pressure test your system. Lack of pressure in the system and leaks are synonymous.

Apr 18, 2010 | 2000 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

I have a 95 tacoma that is overheating it hasa new water pump and thermostat and yet it still overheats


I would look at two thing, the fan and the radiator itself. If you have an electric fan, make sure that it is working by connecting it to the battery directly, I would also test the fan relay. An engine driven fan that has a fan clutch may need the fan clutch replaced, it's the disk looking thing mounted on the shaft with the fan.

Assuming those are okay then you want to look at the radiator itself. It may be clogged internally and need a good flushing out or it can be clogged externally buy road gunk clogging up the fins, you can usually wash that out from the engine side with a garden hose sprayer but you'll probably have to remove it to do a good job

You also want to look for any signs of leakage. An overheat can be caused when coolant leaks out and the coolant level drops to to low a level to adequately carry heat out of the engine. If you notice the cabin heat gets low when the engine is idling this is an indicator of low coolant. Leakage can occur internally to the engine as well. Burning coolant has a very specific smell if it's leaking past the head gasket into the combustion chamber. If it's leaking into the engine block you'll see what looks like coffee and cream colored sludge in the oil, sometimes on the dipstick, or brownish coolant in the radiator.

I would also check the radiator cap for pressure leaks. The pressure raises the boiling temperature of the coolant to well above normal operating temperature. If it's leaking then coolant could be boiling away while you drive until it gets low enough to over heat, your nose will tell you if this is the case, you should never smell hot coolant under normal circumstances. The cap should be replaced every three months anyway.

Feb 18, 2010 | 1995 Toyota Tacoma

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