Question about 2007 GMC Yukon XL Denali

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2009 yukon denali chime door start to lock and unlock every time i hit a bump, lift gate open light come on

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  • GMC Master
  • 5,316 Answers

Might need to adjust rear door latch, or could be bad relay or switch. Try pulling/pushing on rear door while closed to see if you can set this off while sitting still.

Posted on Jan 24, 2015

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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kingcaesar1
  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: lift gate wont open with remote

I spend the next 10 minutes alternating between randomly hitting the FOB’s lock and unlock buttons, until I give up in a garage-filling string of expletives as I realize my kayak and I are SOL. Luckily, I did have a friend and an incredibly helpful REI employee there, whom all pitched in and managed to jam the kayak into the Suburban through the side door. I love my Suburban for reasons like this, though I’m slowly starting to hate GMC. More on this to come.
chevy-suburban-2005.jpg Here’s the Suburban with kayak inside and the lift gate panel on the floor. If you have a Suburban / Tahoe / Yukon in the same situation where your lift gate won’t open, the only way to get it open is to pry the lift gate panel just enough to access the locking mechanism. Take a long flat head screwdriver, slip it into the top section of the panel and start pulling away. The panel is made of a flexible plastic that will bend a fair amount, so don’t be afraid to put a bit of elbow into it. Once you see the locking mechanism, you’ll want to grip the back side that moves and twist counter-clockwise until the door pops open. Once you’ve done this, call GM customer service and tell them that their engineers should be fired for not having a manual release. If there is an accident / fire up front, wouldn’t you like it if your kids could escape out the back? Yeah, me too.
suburban-tailgate-panel.jpg If you’re lucky enough that you can open your door (or maybe it doesn’t lock to begin with), then it’s a little easier to pull off the panel. First, take a socket wrench (9mm, I think) and remove the bolt under the leather handle on the inside of the door (the one you pull down on when your lift gate is up). After that, insert a flat head into the space between the panel and the door and pry open. There will be around 4 or 5 contact points to disconnect.
remove-tailgate-panel.jpg The two last things that stand in your way are plastic hinges that hold the panel to the door frame. With the lift gate open, push the panel toward the car, then spin it an entire half-circle around the hinge in the picture. After that, the panel should pull right out. Now the locking mechanism should be nicely exposed.
suburban-tailgate-unlock.jpg Here we see the lift gate handle at the bottom, which is connected by a tension wire to the locking mechanism. Pulling on the handle causes the wire at the top to retract toward the right, turning the locking mechanism counter-clockwise.
tailgate-lock-explained.jpg However, pulling the handle does nothing when the mechanism is in the locked position, because it doesn’t engage the other tension wire / tailgate release - it just simply moves by itself. When the mechanism is unlocked, pulling on the handle will engage the release mechanism and pop open the door… when the locking mechanism is working, that is.
engaged-door-lock.jpg Here is a properly unlocked door: notice that the black plastic piece (on top of the copper) is slid all the way to the right. You can see that if you rotate the lower copper piece, that it will force the black plastic piece to turn, thus engaging the door release.
tailgate-wont-unlock.jpg Here is why your Suburban tailgate won’t unlock. I’ve just pressed the unlock button on my key FOB and you can see that the black plastic piece has NOT slid over to the right. This means that the door is still LOCKED as far as the mechanism is concerned. No amount of yanking on the handle will open the lift gate at this point.
locking-mechanism-stuck.jpg Zooming in for a close-up, you can really see where the problem is. Gear heads will realize this is a major problem for all sorts of reasons. First, if your door lock actuator is banging against this metal part every time you unlock your door, it will wear out the part extremely fast and you’ve got yourself a busted door. Second, even if you replace your actuator, you’ll just bust it again if it keeps ramming this part. Most importantly, the question is how this is happening to begin with? My Suburban was working fine until I put in a factory replacement handle.
My opinion is that the factory GM replacement was defective and not built to spec, because the tensioner was now pulling a few millimeters more than it should have, which resulted in my lift gate not closing or unlocking. While millimeters might not mean anything to some cheap factory in China or Mexico, it means a whole lot of difference to the Joe Schmoe who wants to have a car that works. It may also be due to a small and very important spring that resets the lock back into place.
suburban-door-lock-actuator.jpg I’ve read a whole ton of reports about Suburban lift gates, along with Tahoes, Yukons and other GM cars failing and drivers stuck with unlockable doors. I believe this type of careless “few millimeters off isn’t important” BS is likely to blame. That’s why some people may have locks that work only half the time, or some work after their actuators are replaced, but fail soon afterward. My two-cent opinion - back to fixing cars.
relieve-handle-tension.jpg So what we need to do, is make some space for that locking (technically, “unlock”) mechanism to engage fully. On my Suburban, this meant giving the metal tensioner just a little more slack - 2mm would be all I need.
removing-handle-wire.jpg First, I pushed the handle wire mechanism over to the right and then pulled out the metal ball and wire. After that, I pinched the blue wire cap and pushed it out of the metal holder.
unlocked-tailgate.jpg You can now see that there is a lot of visible space between the locking mechanism and the metal. Pressing lock and unlock on my key FOB easily moved the unit back and forth successfully, so I knew it wasn’t a problem with the actuator. Now comes the disclaimer part.
bend-lock-mechanism.jpg DISCLAIMER: Attempt this section at your own risk, you are responsible for your own actions!!! Not seeing a lot of options, I decided I would take a somewhat drastic approach and bend the wire holder closer to the locking mechanism with a pair of pliers. I only needed about 2mm, so I felt this was acceptable without busting the car too much. Needless to say, this is not a graceful fix nor one I really wanted to do, but there appeared to be little other options other than cutting your own tensioner line (adjusting the line would be the most logical method, but I pinching and pulling got me no results) or finding some concrete way of bracing the line closer to the locking mechanism. If you come up with an elegant solution, please let me know.
fixed-tailgate-lock.jpg Phew, finally - the fixed tailgate lock! You can see there is just enough room for the mechanism to engage and that the handle tension wire is snugly seated into its new home. I tested the lock about 100 times to be sure that everything was working as it should and I advise you do the same once you get to this point.
Now, simply put the panel back on the same way you took it off (don’t forget to screw the bolt back into the handle) and you’re done. Have a beer and go pat yourself on the back.
If this blog post has helped at all, I’d appreciate if you left a comment to share you experiences so others in the same situation can hear what you did. Thanks.

Posted on Nov 03, 2009

wracefans24
  • 1985 Answers

SOURCE: HOW TO OPEN LIFT GATE OF 2005 YUKON XL

have you had someone try the unlock while you listen at the hatch to see if you hear the solenoid working?
My guess is your going to have to remove the rear hatch panel to gain access

Posted on Dec 09, 2009

taran_2005
  • 10515 Answers

SOURCE: My yukon 2006 lift gate

Hi,

I have had several of the Tahoes with the same issue... the fault is with the lock/unlock actuator inside the rear door. if it fails and doesn't move the release on the latch... the door doesn't operate properly.What you will need to do is to remove the upper trim panel by pulling it off the door towards the front of the vehicle (it's held in by clips) and then pry/pull back the lower to access the actuator and move the arm and release the door.after you get it open and replace the lock actuator for the liftgate. This should take care of your issue.

Let me know,if needed further assistance.

Hope i helped you.

Thanks for using ' Fixya ' and have a nice day!!

Posted on Aug 11, 2011

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I have 2005 chevy tahoe my doors all licks but my liftgate door with window stays open use to lock w all my doors? I havent check anytjing yet? I cant lock it.


Here is how it works !
Liftgate Locking Operation
The lift gate will lock any time the vehicle is shifted out of park on vehicles equipped with an automatic transmission and at vehicle speeds exceeding 5 kph with manual transmission. This happens in conjunction with auto door locks if enabled or independently of auto door locks if the feature is disabled. This ensures that the lift gate is locked anytime the vehicle is shifted out of park or when the vehicle is in motion.
The lift gate lock relay supply and coil sides receive a constant voltage through the battery voltage supply circuit and the ECC fuse. The normally closed contact is connected to ground and the control side is connected to the body control module (BCM). A lock function will occur when a door lock switch activation, keyless entry lock transmission, auto door lock function or a lift gate lock function has been received by the BCM. The BCM will then ground the control side of the lift gate lock relay. This energizes the relay and allows voltage to be applied to the lift gate lock actuator lock control circuit. Since the other side of the lift gate lock actuator is connected to the normally closed contacts of the door unlock relay to ground, the lift gate will lock. When an unlock function occurs the BCM will ground the control side of the unlock relay and the rear doors and lift gate will unlock.
The BCM also runs diagnostics on the lift gate lock relay control circuit and will set DTC B3825 as current and also send a Class 2 message to the DIC. The DIC will display REPLACE LIFTGATE FUSE to inform the driver that a fault has been detected in the lift gate lock circuit and that the lift gate is not locked. Faults that will set the DTC and cause the DIC to display the message could be any of the following:
?€¢
An open ECC fuse


?€¢
An open or short to ground in the lift gate lock relay battery positive voltage circuit


?€¢
A faulty lift gate lock relay


?€¢
An open or short to ground in the lift gate lock relay control circuit


?€¢
A short to ground in the lift gate lock actuator lock control circuit


?€¢
A faulty BCM

May 14, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How do I open the cargo door if it wont open?


rear door hatch lock repair GMC Chevrolet - YouTube

? 4:26
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QS3PMhGgyAg
Apr 5, 2014 - Uploaded by auto resource
2002 Yukon, rear hatch lock not locking. ... rear door hatch lock repair GMC Chevrolet. auto resource ... chevy tahoe lift gate notopening - Duration: 2:12. ... A Method how to unlock your car in 10 seconds :) - Duration: 0:35.

chevy tahoe lift gate not opening - YouTube

? 2:12
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xU6ybiY3F4I
Sep 1, 2010 - Uploaded by 76bluemoon
Back lift gate/glass would not open or release. Even when unlocked with the key fob or the unlock switch on the drivers/passenger door. ... How To Install Replace Rear Lift Gate handle 2002-09 GMC Envoy Chevy Trailblazer ...

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LIFTGATE MOTOR WENT OUT. HOW CAN I OPEN THE DOOR MANUALLY?


chevy tahoe lift gate not opening - YouTube

? 2:12
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Sep 1, 2010 - Uploaded by 76bluemoon Back lift gate/glass would not open or release. ... Wow, are you sure? .... known issue with tahoe, suburbans, hummers and othergmc vehicles. ... 2007-2012 Yukon Denali Rear Door Lock Actuator Replacement ... 2004 GMC Yukon XL rear liftgateremoval - Duration: 50:17. by Velvethamma 5,814 views.

Aug 08, 2015 | 2007 GMC Yukon XL Denali

2 Answers

I HAVE A 2007 GMC YUKON SLT AND ALL THE BUTTONS WORK EXCEPT FOR REMOTE START


if the body control module is seeing any door or hood not completly closed it will not start.

Feb 17, 2013 | 2007 GMC Yukon Denali

1 Answer

HOW TO OPEN LIFT GATE OF 2005 YUKON XL. I ASSUME THAT THE RELAY UNDER THE HOOD IS GOOD, SINCE ALL OTHER FOUR DOORS WORK. (LOCK-UNLOCK). I THINK THAT IT MIGHT BE A SOLEONID IN THE LIFT GATE ITSELF. NO KEY...


have you had someone try the unlock while you listen at the hatch to see if you hear the solenoid working?
My guess is your going to have to remove the rear hatch panel to gain access

Dec 07, 2009 | 2003 GMC Yukon Denali

1 Answer

Lift gate wont open with remote


I spend the next 10 minutes alternating between randomly hitting the FOB’s lock and unlock buttons, until I give up in a garage-filling string of expletives as I realize my kayak and I are SOL. Luckily, I did have a friend and an incredibly helpful REI employee there, whom all pitched in and managed to jam the kayak into the Suburban through the side door. I love my Suburban for reasons like this, though I’m slowly starting to hate GMC. More on this to come.
chevy-suburban-2005.jpg Here’s the Suburban with kayak inside and the lift gate panel on the floor. If you have a Suburban / Tahoe / Yukon in the same situation where your lift gate won’t open, the only way to get it open is to pry the lift gate panel just enough to access the locking mechanism. Take a long flat head screwdriver, slip it into the top section of the panel and start pulling away. The panel is made of a flexible plastic that will bend a fair amount, so don’t be afraid to put a bit of elbow into it. Once you see the locking mechanism, you’ll want to grip the back side that moves and twist counter-clockwise until the door pops open. Once you’ve done this, call GM customer service and tell them that their engineers should be fired for not having a manual release. If there is an accident / fire up front, wouldn’t you like it if your kids could escape out the back? Yeah, me too.
suburban-tailgate-panel.jpg If you’re lucky enough that you can open your door (or maybe it doesn’t lock to begin with), then it’s a little easier to pull off the panel. First, take a socket wrench (9mm, I think) and remove the bolt under the leather handle on the inside of the door (the one you pull down on when your lift gate is up). After that, insert a flat head into the space between the panel and the door and pry open. There will be around 4 or 5 contact points to disconnect.
remove-tailgate-panel.jpg The two last things that stand in your way are plastic hinges that hold the panel to the door frame. With the lift gate open, push the panel toward the car, then spin it an entire half-circle around the hinge in the picture. After that, the panel should pull right out. Now the locking mechanism should be nicely exposed.
suburban-tailgate-unlock.jpg Here we see the lift gate handle at the bottom, which is connected by a tension wire to the locking mechanism. Pulling on the handle causes the wire at the top to retract toward the right, turning the locking mechanism counter-clockwise.
tailgate-lock-explained.jpg However, pulling the handle does nothing when the mechanism is in the locked position, because it doesn’t engage the other tension wire / tailgate release - it just simply moves by itself. When the mechanism is unlocked, pulling on the handle will engage the release mechanism and pop open the door… when the locking mechanism is working, that is.
engaged-door-lock.jpg Here is a properly unlocked door: notice that the black plastic piece (on top of the copper) is slid all the way to the right. You can see that if you rotate the lower copper piece, that it will force the black plastic piece to turn, thus engaging the door release.
tailgate-wont-unlock.jpg Here is why your Suburban tailgate won’t unlock. I’ve just pressed the unlock button on my key FOB and you can see that the black plastic piece has NOT slid over to the right. This means that the door is still LOCKED as far as the mechanism is concerned. No amount of yanking on the handle will open the lift gate at this point.
locking-mechanism-stuck.jpg Zooming in for a close-up, you can really see where the problem is. Gear heads will realize this is a major problem for all sorts of reasons. First, if your door lock actuator is banging against this metal part every time you unlock your door, it will wear out the part extremely fast and you’ve got yourself a busted door. Second, even if you replace your actuator, you’ll just bust it again if it keeps ramming this part. Most importantly, the question is how this is happening to begin with? My Suburban was working fine until I put in a factory replacement handle.
My opinion is that the factory GM replacement was defective and not built to spec, because the tensioner was now pulling a few millimeters more than it should have, which resulted in my lift gate not closing or unlocking. While millimeters might not mean anything to some cheap factory in China or Mexico, it means a whole lot of difference to the Joe Schmoe who wants to have a car that works. It may also be due to a small and very important spring that resets the lock back into place.
suburban-door-lock-actuator.jpg I’ve read a whole ton of reports about Suburban lift gates, along with Tahoes, Yukons and other GM cars failing and drivers stuck with unlockable doors. I believe this type of careless “few millimeters off isn’t important” BS is likely to blame. That’s why some people may have locks that work only half the time, or some work after their actuators are replaced, but fail soon afterward. My two-cent opinion - back to fixing cars.
relieve-handle-tension.jpg So what we need to do, is make some space for that locking (technically, “unlock”) mechanism to engage fully. On my Suburban, this meant giving the metal tensioner just a little more slack - 2mm would be all I need.
removing-handle-wire.jpg First, I pushed the handle wire mechanism over to the right and then pulled out the metal ball and wire. After that, I pinched the blue wire cap and pushed it out of the metal holder.
unlocked-tailgate.jpg You can now see that there is a lot of visible space between the locking mechanism and the metal. Pressing lock and unlock on my key FOB easily moved the unit back and forth successfully, so I knew it wasn’t a problem with the actuator. Now comes the disclaimer part.
bend-lock-mechanism.jpg DISCLAIMER: Attempt this section at your own risk, you are responsible for your own actions!!! Not seeing a lot of options, I decided I would take a somewhat drastic approach and bend the wire holder closer to the locking mechanism with a pair of pliers. I only needed about 2mm, so I felt this was acceptable without busting the car too much. Needless to say, this is not a graceful fix nor one I really wanted to do, but there appeared to be little other options other than cutting your own tensioner line (adjusting the line would be the most logical method, but I pinching and pulling got me no results) or finding some concrete way of bracing the line closer to the locking mechanism. If you come up with an elegant solution, please let me know.
fixed-tailgate-lock.jpg Phew, finally - the fixed tailgate lock! You can see there is just enough room for the mechanism to engage and that the handle tension wire is snugly seated into its new home. I tested the lock about 100 times to be sure that everything was working as it should and I advise you do the same once you get to this point.
Now, simply put the panel back on the same way you took it off (don’t forget to screw the bolt back into the handle) and you’re done. Have a beer and go pat yourself on the back.
If this blog post has helped at all, I’d appreciate if you left a comment to share you experiences so others in the same situation can hear what you did. Thanks.

Oct 03, 2009 | 2007 GMC Yukon Denali

2 Answers

I have a 2007 yukon and the lift gate goes up about half way and returns to the closed position. What is going on?


try removing your shocks/struts for the lift gate. once removed, check to see if they fully extend in and out of the barrel. You may have bent shocks/struts. Also, check to see there is nothing preventing the lift-gate from opening such as a bolt or acorns between the spoiler and the roof...

Jul 17, 2009 | 2007 GMC Yukon Denali

1 Answer

Rear doors not unlocking


Replace the door lock / unlock relay in the fuse box next to the driver side door. no problem since than.

Oct 05, 2008 | 2003 GMC Yukon Denali

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