Question about 2002 GMC Envoy

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Replace flan clutch and water pump and alternator but still makes a clicking noise, what can cause this problem?

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A brand new out of the box fan clutch did this to me. Ticks are driving me crazy. It's probably your new fan clutch unfortunately. Mine was purchased at Autozone if this helps.

Posted on Feb 17, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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My 1999 ford RAnger has heat but the fan makes alot of noise and does not blow out the heat and the trucks gauge will go hot. What would the issue? Heater core or mayb just the fuse?


Diagnose Cooling Fan Clutch On engines with belt-driven cooling fans, a fan clutch is often used to save energy and reduce noise. The fan clutch disengages slows or disengages the engine's cooling fan when extra cooling isn't needed. The fan pulls air through the radiator and air conditioning condenser when the vehicle isn't moving fast enough to provide adequate airflow for cooling. A fan can eat up anywhere from a couple of horsepower up to 12 or 15 hp on a big V8, so by reducing the parasitic horsepower loss on the engine the fan clutch makes a noticeable difference in fuel economy

TWO TYPES OF FAN CLUTCHES basic types of fan clutches: thermal and non-thermal (also called "torque limiting Thermal fan clutches have a temperature-sensitive bimetal coil spring on the front that reacts to temperature changes. When the air coming through the radiator is hot, the spring expands and opens an internal valve that reduces clutch slippage. This causes the fan to spin faster for increased cooling. As the air cools, the spring contracts and closes the valve. This increases the amount of clutch slippage, allowing the fan to slow down and decrease cooling FAN CLUTCH OPERATION

The clutch consists of a fluid coupling filled with a silicone based oil. In the cutaway view at the left, the area between the teeth on the clutch plates is filled with silicone fluid. An internal valve opens and closes a passage between the main fluid cavity and a fluid reservoir. When the passage is open, fluid enters the clutch and makes the fan to turn faster. When the valve is shut, fluid flows back to the reservoir but doesn't return, causing the clutch to slip and the fan to turn more slowly.
The non-thermal (torque limiting) fan clutch doesn't have a temperature sensing capability. It reacts only to speed, slipping to limit maximum fan speed to about 1200 to 2200 rpm depending on the application.

FAN CLUTCH PROBLEMS

A slipping fan clutch is often overlooked as the cause of an engine overheating problem.
As a fan clutch ages, fluid deterioration gradually causes an increase in slippage (about 200 rpm per year). After a number of years of service, the clutch may slip so badly that the fan can't keep up with the cooling needs of the engine and the engine overheats. At this point, replacement is often necessary.
Other signs of fan cluch failure would include any looseness in the clutch (check for fan wobble), or oil streaks radiating outward from the clutch hub.
If the clutch is binding, the fan may not release causing excessive cooling and noise, especially at highway speeds

CHECKING THE FAN CLUTCH

A good clutch should offer a certain amount of resistance when spun by hand (engine off, of course!). But if the fan spins with little resistance (more than 1 to 1-1/2 turns), the fan clutch is slipping too much and needs to be replaced.
If the fan binds, does not turn or offers a lot of resistance, it has seized and also needs to be replaced.
Fan speed can also be checked with an optical tachometer, by marking one of the fan blades with chalk and using a timing light to observe speed changes, and/or listening for changes in fan noise as engine speed changes.
You should also try to wiggle the fan blades by hand. If there is any wobble in the fan, there is a bad bearing in the fan clutch, or a worn bearing on the water pump shaft. A bad water pump bearing will usually cause the water pump to leak and/or make noise, but not always. Remove the fan clutch and see if the play is in the water pump shaft. If it feels tight (no play or wobble), replace the fan clutch.

FAN CLUTCH REPLACEMENT

Many experts say it is a good idea to replace the fan clutch at the same time as the water pump if the water pump has failed. The reason is because both age at about the same rate, so if the water pump has failed, the fan clutch may also fail soon. As as we mentioned earlier, a high mileage fan clutch may be slipping excessively increasing the risk of overheating.
When you buy a replacement fan clutch, make sure you get the same type (thermal or nonthermal) as the original. You can always upgrade from a nonthermal to a more efficient thermal fan clutch, but never the reverse. Or, you can get rid of the fan and clutch altogether and install an aftermarket electric fan kit to cool the radiator.

Sep 28, 2016 | Ford Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

There's a sound like a bad bearing coming from the water pump but no water coming out of the weep hole. i'm guessing the pump is bad. is this common for this car?


Bearings on a water pump failing on any car is a common problem! The water leaking from around the water pump area is the tell tale sign.........get it checked out and replaced as soon as possible to avoid further damage to the engine.

Oct 14, 2015 | 1993 Geo Prizm

1 Answer

What is causing rattling grinding noise at idle especially in my 89 4.5 DeVille?


The technique I always used to identify where such a noise was coming from was to use a very long screwdriver (2 feet long), while the engine is running. CAREFULLY touch the screwdriver end to each pulley or other object under the hood, and put your ear to the handle. The device making the noise will become very clear.

It could be AC pump/clutch, alternator, water pump, power steering pump, etc.

May 20, 2015 | Cadillac DeVille Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

New fan clutch making clicking noise, what can cause this problem?


There is a bearing in the fan clutch and it may be faulty. check that the fan blades are not touching on the shroud . Check that the water pump bearing is good.

Feb 16, 2014 | 2002 GMC Envoy

1 Answer

First start of the day, engine fires up and runs well then stalls


This is a tough one to solve without hearing it myself. There are several things which will make noise, its the stalling that matters. I will give you 4 that can stall a car and make noise.
1.Traction control cutting off airflow to engine.
2.Automatic ride control pump pulling down alternator.
3.A/C pump locking up.
4.Bad Alternator
5.Bad fan clutch or water pump

You should go to Autozone or Oreillys for a free scan of your cars computer.

Mar 16, 2010 | 2000 Lincoln Town Car

4 Answers

I have a high pitched noise which appears to be coming from front right engine compartment (as you are looking at the engine) which sounds kind of like a belt that is squealing. It is intermittent. Just...


Could be several things. WHICH ENGINE?.. 4 cylinder (has three belts, power steering/water pump, alternator & A/C compressor, one tensioner pully A/C compressor), The V6 2.7 (has only one belt, 1 Idler pully and 1 tensioner pully), the V6 3.5 has two belts - A/C/alternator, and power steering - there are two tensioner pullys). Noises can be caused by the belt(s) themselves, pullys, bearings, pully bearings, water pump shaft bearings (or belts/pullys rubbing up against something). Let's not forget that there is also belt(s) behind the Timing Belt cover as well as pullys and bearings associated with the timing system. You could start by removing one accy drive belt at a time (alternator, water pump, compressor, power steering, etc) to see whether or not the noise goes away in each case. If after each case, you discover the noise is still there, it's probably behind the timing belt cover (idler/tensioner pully, water pump shaft bearing, crankshaft bearing, etc.). Good Luck

Jun 29, 2009 | 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe

2 Answers

Vibration/Whinning Noise while drivin


Check fuel pump pressure. sounds silly but my 1500 ram van did this 2 months . replaced a lot of parts then left me sitting on side the road. Cause was fuel filter and pump.

Apr 20, 2009 | Dodge Ram 1500 Cars & Trucks

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