Question about 2004 Honda CR-V

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Honda crv 2004 manual transmission. Low power in low gears

Acceleration do not increase RPM of engine.

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  • Honda Master
  • 20,706 Answers

That is a weak engine, if the tranny dont slip , engine power issues.
ever tune it up? ever 60k miles>?
does the CEL lamp glow , running? yes, then scan it.
if errors found(DTC) then post them.

Posted on Feb 18, 2014

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6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 407 Answers

SOURCE: High pitch whirring noise (jet like taking off to space noise) coming from engine/transmission when i increase my RPMs with gas pedal.

check for vacuum leak

Posted on Apr 28, 2009

Molson02536
  • 3854 Answers

SOURCE: idle is too low, car dies, engine runs fine

An IAC (idle air control) motor is designed to adjust the engine idle RPM speed by opening and closing an air bypass passage inside the throttle body. The car computer or ECM (electronic control module) receives information from various sensors and will output signals to adjust the IAC motor in or out to adjust engine idle speed by controlling engine idle air.
An IAC motor is highly susceptible to carbon and coking build up; if an IAC goes too long without cleaning it can cause stalling and poor idle quality. Some cars are designed with a large vacuum transfer hose that connects the intake manifold to the IAC (idle air control) motor. If a broken or dilapidated these vacuum lines can cause the engine to lose vacuum which will allow the engine to run rough and die. 
Inspect all engine and accessory vacuum lines to look for missing, torn or dilapidated lines and replace as needed. To check the IAC motor remove the unit, with the wires connected turn the key to the "on" position without starting the engine, the IAC should move in or out. 
If the IAC motor does nothing it has probably failed, replace it with a new unit and recheck system. Note: while the IAC motor is removed clean (use aerosol carburetor cleaner) the passages the IAC uses to control idle air speed.

Good luck and hope this helps

Posted on May 08, 2009

  • 3 Answers

SOURCE: 2004 Honda Civic -Code P0122 Throttle Position Sensor Voltage Low

yes, this is the case of a failed throttle body, in which case it needs replaced, the car is getting too much fuel causing the high idle. this needs replaced asap. you could proably find a small independant honda shop that could do the work for less.

Posted on May 12, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: How do I change the transmission fluid in my 2004

ourhowse, you may know cars, but you DON'T know the CRV. Both the automatic and manual transmission have drain plugs basically like the oil pan. Look at several of the online videos.

Posted on Aug 12, 2009

  • 13 Answers

SOURCE: sluggish acceleration from low rpm feels

goto walmart and get wynn's signature engine tuneup(8$) and put in your engine and run for 100 kms then have a oil change see the difference.

Posted on Nov 19, 2009

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1 Answer

Car surging


Is the car equipped with the Automatic Transmission?
If so, read on.
Otherwise skip to the end and answer some questions.

POSSIBLE SCENARIO:
I have observed a condition where my car surges slightly when the torque-converter clutch (TCC) cycles between lock and unlock when driving on an uphill grade.
First some basics and history that will explain why the TCC is used.

Engine, Torque Converter, TCC, and Transmission relationship--
The TCC allows for a solid connection between the engine and transmission which allows the input to the transmission to rotate at the same speed as the engine.
Without a TCC, there is slippage between the engine and automatic transmission. The slippage is greatest at low engine RPM. That is what allows the engine to run with the automatic transmission in gear, like when you first shift into gear or stop at a stop sign. When the throttle pedal is depressed, the engine RPM begins to increase and the torque converter begins to slip less and less the more the engine RPM increases. The car moves. But even at cruising speeds the torque converter slips slightly. Engine RPM is greater than transmission input RPM, which is realized as slight decrease in fuel efficiency.
When acceleration is complete and a constant speed is being maintained, the engine power output is reduced to the point where the TCC can engage and eliminate any slippage between the engine and transmission. If the car has a tachometer the engagement of the TCC can be verified when a slight reduction in engine RPM observed without a corresponding change in vehicle speed.
One method used to test the operation of the TCC is as follows:
Find a flat section of road where it is safe to perform the test.
Reach a steady speed and keep the gas pedal depressed with one foot. While observing the tachometer (or listening for an increase in engine RPM), with the other foot depress the brake pedal enough to activate the break light switch but not enough to engage the brakes. When the brake light switch activates, the TCC receives a signal to disengage. With the gas pedal being held steady, release the brake pedal and the engine RPM should decrease when the TCC engages.
Old cars with Automatic Transmissions did not use a TCC. I believe the TCC was put in use in an attempt to increase fuel economy.

MY EXPERIENCE WITH SIMILAR SYMPTOMS
The condition that causes that issue on my car is this:
- A slight uphill grade increases the load on the engine.
The car tends to gradually slow and it is necessary to depress the gas pedal to maintain speed.
- Depressing the throttle pedal (manually, or automatically with cruise control engaged) signals the torque converter clutch to unlock when the load increases slightly. (A more drastic load increase would signal the Transmission to downshift to a lower gear.) The corresponding increase in engine RPM and output is enough to compensate for the reduction in speed. When the vehicle speed, engine RPM, and throttle position stabilize to the point that the TCC will engage and the engine RPM will reduce in correspondence with TCC engagement. Now, if the road conditions have not changed, power output is not enough to maintain vehicle speed. With the increased load caused by full engagement between engine and transmission, and the cycle (surging) repeats itself until the road conditions change.

Does that help?
If not:

QUESTIONS
Please define the symptoms.
What are the road conditions when the surge occurs? (A slight uphill grade?)
What is the frequency of the surge?
Does the engine power output have a noticeable surge?
Is there a speed change related to the surge?
Does the tachometer move up and down with little or no change in vehicle speed?
Are all instrument indication in the normal range?
What else has changed?

Good luck!

May 24, 2014 | Subaru Impreza WRX STi Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What is the RMP for 2003 honda crv supposed to be when traveling between 60-80 mph


any car the rpm shouldn't exceed the 4000 round per minutes and you can check it from the sound of the car if it's so loud you should decrease the acceleration pad or give the next gear if it's manual
if it's automatic don't panic

Aug 23, 2012 | Honda CRV Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

96 escort 1.9 manual jerking while accelerating 96 escort 1.9 manual


best advice is dont go 40mph in 5th gear... if you are going up a hill at 40mph in 5th gear i have no doubt that it is jerking, your putting too much stress on the engine. shift up to 4th or 3rd you will be fine. 5th gear is an overdrive gear. 55+mph

Dec 01, 2011 | Ford Escort Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Can i shift the gear immediately while climbing on a high roads from high speed to low speed on a automatic transmission 1996 honda civic vti vtec? Do i need to brake first the engine before i will shift...


That is not recommended, as it could cause transmission damage. Since you have a VTEC you should get a power boost at around 5000 rpm which should make climbing hills easier and not need a shift of the transmission.

Jun 12, 2011 | Honda Civic Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Is a 650 to 750 rpm idle low for a 2009 honda crv or is 650 normal?


That sounds pretty low to me.
It usually rests above 1000 then higher as the high idle solenoid engages for air conditioning.
If your A-C is on, your engine should increase idle.
Try starting with no AC then turn it on after the engine warms up.

Mar 07, 2010 | 2007 Honda CR-V

1 Answer

Sluggish acceleration from low rpm feels


goto walmart and get wynn's signature engine tuneup(8$) and put in your engine and run for 100 kms then have a oil change see the difference.

Nov 16, 2009 | 1995 Honda Prelude

1 Answer

1998 honda crv vibrates when starting out


Increased vibration from a vehicle indicates worn out engine supports. This vibration often disappears when revving the engine high, but is very noticeable at low revs.

You can have these inspected and possibly replaced to reduce the vibration cominf from your engine.

Hope this helps.

Jul 02, 2009 | 1998 Honda CR-V

1 Answer

92 prelude si (auto)


With normal acceleration the 1st to second shift point should be around 2500-3000 rpm. Most of your shifts under moderate acceleration will take place at this same point or when there a light load on the transmission. Under hard acceleration the RPMs will climp higher due to increased power needs and the computer will shift when less power is needed or the RPMs climb to an unsafe speed say5000-6000rpms (depending on where yours redlines). Also going up a steep hill will raise the RPMs higher and goind down a hill will cause a faster shift at lower RPMs. These can always be altered by an individual owner by adjusting shift points, using performance parts and if you have problems (low tranny fluid/trans issues). Your trans RPMS are fine and will vary depening on how your foot accelerates. The shift pattern should be the same every time you drive slow/medium/fast/, look for changes in those patterns you will also catch a problem early.

Jun 14, 2009 | 1992 Honda Prelude

2 Answers

Stick shift # Automatic RPM


That is normal,If you do the same speed in 4th gear the rpm's will almost double.

The rpm's will repond faster in a manual than an automatic.

In a manual the engine supplies the power required directly to the gear that you have selected thus the engine rpm's will increase or decrease as needed.

Jan 07, 2009 | 2002 Nissan Altima

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