Question about 1988 Ford F 150

1 Answer

No fire thru coil wire

Changed coil, distributor module, pick-up in distributor, wires, plugs, rotary button, engine control relay, and (EMC) engine control module (computer). it still has no fire thru the coil wire. would the fuel pump (if Bad) shut the fire off to the engine?

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  • Ford Master
  • 975 Answers

No,the pump wouldn't do that. Pull the dist cap and crank the engine,make sure the rotor spins,may have sheared the pin one the shaft.

Posted on Feb 09, 2014

Testimonial: "did that already. rotor spins. coil not receiving signal from distributor"

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 19 Answers

SOURCE: 1989 mustang it just cranks will not start ,, i

check the enertia switch in the trunk its kills power to the fuel pump in an accident, ive had mine pop from hiting a large pot hole. theres a little white tab on a black box you need to push down to reset it.

Posted on Mar 08, 2010

  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: 1994 f150 no fire to coil or fuel pump

i got a 1994 f150 that starts but cuts right back off so i had no fuel psi so i put a new fuel pump and fillter then found out that it was not getting power to the pump the cut off is not triped and no brakes in the wires can anyone help??

Posted on Sep 10, 2009

  • 532 Answers

SOURCE: 1997 ford f-150...no power to coil packs or fuel pump

hows the fuel pump?i just changed mine in a 2000 f150 with 130,000 miles

Posted on Apr 23, 2009

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1 Answer

Mazda 626 just stop cranking


Check fuses under hood and stater relays located in the power distribution box.

Aug 09, 2015 | 1997 Mazda 626

1 Answer

89 k1500 towed, now fuel injectors dont fire. read all wired to and from ecm, check good. ecm will start another truck.


Check the ECM fuse and then check for any loose wire connectors, especially at the fire-wall area, the ignition coil, and the distributor. Then check for battery voltage at the positive side of the ignition coil when the ignition key is in the "On" or "Run" position, and there should also be battery voltage running over from a wire that is also connected to the positive side of the ignition coil, and then that wire will run over from the ignition coil to the ignition module inside of the distributor, and if there is battery voltage there at the ignition module, then either the ignition module or the pick-up coil inside of the distributor will be the most likely suspects for the cause of the problem.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is actually what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like it could also be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.


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Sep 18, 2010 | 1989 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

What would cause my car to not send spark to the spark plugs


The first thing is do you know when the last time was that the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires were changed?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require a firing order diagram any further assistance with testing or diagnostic procedures.




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Jul 29, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

My 95 gmc will not atart i changed the fuel tank


If you do have fuel pressure, but there is no fuel getting into the cylinders to run the engine, then the engine does not have an injector signal or pulse to open the fuel injectors.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jun 24, 2010 | 1997 GMC Sierra K2500

2 Answers

No fire or spark


Souds like ignition module has failed. Check for 12 volts to mod and replace mod if voltage is good.

Jun 11, 2009 | 1995 Chevrolet K1500

2 Answers

I have an 89 k3500 454 tbi not getting fire to plugs. have fire to and from coil, aldo has new coil ignition module ingnition switch distributor cap rotor button distibutor and starter. but no fire to...


Check the resistance of the pick-up coil in the distributor. Reading should be between 800 to 1200 ohms. Disconnect the two wire connection at the distributor control module to measure the resistance.
Let me know.
Regards,

Mar 25, 2009 | 1989 Chevrolet K3500

2 Answers

No spark, just put in a new coil, distrbutor isnt dirty or wet, sombody told to check out the littl box's on the fender well, what are these to box's and what is there purpose? Mike 77 cj-5 304 3spd I...


I had the same problem with my 85 cj7 this week, I relpaced the ignition control module, plugs, wires, cap, rotor and the the coil; still had no fire to plugs. the problem turned out to be my distributor, replaced it today and she fired right up. Most likely it was the pick up module in the distributor that went bad.

Nov 30, 2008 | 1983 Jeep CJ7

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