Question about 2000 Oldsmobile Intrigue

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P0335 p0340 and p0385 on at the same time

Car won't start, have to cycle the key random amount of time to get car to crank. Have replaced the camshaft pos sensor about 9 months ago and did the crankshaft pos sensor last week.

Posted by Anonymous on

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

SOURCE: 01 oldsmobile aurora crank sensor code

Call autozone and ask them to define the codes for ya then get with your mechanic and get em fixed.

Posted on Jun 18, 2008

  • 112 Answers

SOURCE: car won"t start. starter turns. Happened once before. started after 30-45min.

I would start by banging the bottom of the gas tank while you are cranking it over. If this causes it to start, replace the fuel pump. If it still doesn't start, there is a valve on the fuel rail on the top of the engine (you may have to remove plastic cover). Remove the plastic cap on the valve, and while you have someone cycle the ignition to the run position from the off position, depress the center tab on the valve and see if gas comes out. If it doesn't, replace the fuel pump. If it does, let me know and I will help you further. (note: replace fuel filer at same time.)

Posted on Oct 19, 2008

alicantecoli
  • 22156 Answers

SOURCE: 2000 alero crankshaft position sensor

yes it can stop vehicle from starting,but i would call a mobile mechanic to check it out for you,start changing bits willy nilly and it will cost you more in the long run.

Posted on Jan 23, 2009

Tech jk
  • 102 Answers

SOURCE: '03 Aurora 4.0L Stalling

Yes, the crank position sensors are very common for this.

Posted on Mar 19, 2009

  • 6982 Answers

SOURCE: turn the key and nothing happens,no crank,no sound,no start

It seems that you have a loose wire, bad connector or perhaps the main computer itself that is causing a problem If the shop is not seeing any codes, or codes come and go, likely I'm right...but someone is going to have to actually do some intensive testing to find the real cause. You can likely get another computer from a local scrapyard far cheaper than what the dealer will charge you...as far as wiring, you need a good accurate schematic a good volt/ohmeter and lots of time to trace wiring. When checking connectors test the pin, then probe the wire going into the pin...often the problem is where a wire meets the backside of the pin, either corroding or breaking..This also applies to any modules such as the security system...what you see on the dash does not always tell you that connection to components is good. This is not a "fix, but rather, a direction to go in. (exactly what I"d need to do if I was there)
Right now, everything is suspect including fuel system, till you rule it out!!!

Posted on Jun 05, 2009

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I have a 1999 Suzuki Esteem that is giving off the code P0340.Oreilly auto parts is telling me that my car has two separate sensors. Can someone please advise me. 1999 Suzuki Esteem 1.8L GLX Wagon.


why ask a clerk? that??
J18 engine has 2 key sensors,
CKP behind the flywheel (aaahhhcraaappppp)
and
CMP on rear of cam,
so what is 340,well the service manual is clear
why not ask it , NOT/clerks.
340 is CAM, or CMP sensor.
lucky you.
no pull transmissions!!

btw ,crank sensor sets DTC p0335

if not wanting to guess, and get rumors and lies.
ever see this?
posted 100s of times. the real deal.
just $4


https://suzukipitstopplus.com/Products/10133-1999-esteem-service-manual.aspx

Feb 15, 2017 | Suzuki Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Crank and cam sensor replaced . cars starts and run but still reads code 335 . cranksensor circuit malfunction. and idea whats the issue why this code is still coming up.?


the sensor may be good its the circuit code which means can be a wiring /connection problem not just the sensor the following link is courtesy of obd-codes.comP0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction What does that mean? The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set. Symptoms NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include: Vehicle may not start (see above) Vehicle may run rough or misfire MIL illumination Causes A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by: Damaged CKP sensor connector Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway) Sensor output open Sensor output shorted to ground Sensor output shorted to voltage Failed crank sensor Broken timing belt Failed PCM Possible Solutions Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs? If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay? If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault. This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335
Copyright OBD-Codes.com
http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335

Aug 19, 2015 | 2005 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Trouble code p0335


Replace the crankshaft position sensor and you should be up and running like normal. Verify that there is no power or ground problem to the crankshaft sensor, the Yellow/Black wire should have battery voltage any time the key is on and the main relay is energized.Verify that the Brown/Yellow wire has a good ground. If all is good then replace.


P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

Symptoms:
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination


A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.


Hope helps.

Dec 18, 2011 | 2006 Jeep Liberty

1 Answer

It show code po385


P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms:

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:

Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

Causes: A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
* Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
* If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
* If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
* If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps (remember to rate this answer).

Jun 07, 2011 | 2001 Oldsmobile Intrigue

1 Answer

What does code 385 mean


P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction

What does that mean?
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
* Vehicle may not start (see above)
* Vehicle may run rough or misfire
* MIL illumination

Causes
A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
* Damaged CKP sensor connector
* Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
* Sensor output open
* Sensor output shorted to ground
* Sensor output shorted to voltage
* Failed crank sensor
* Failed PCM

Possible Solutions
1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope helps (remember rated this).

Jun 14, 2010 | 1995 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

2002 Mitsubishi Galant 2.4 with repeating error codes P0335,P0340


Check your timing marks , you may have jump the tooth on a timing belt.

May 10, 2010 | Mitsubishi Galant Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My cadillac deville has the following engine codes when hooed up: P0106, P0121, P0171, P0174, P0335, P0340, P0385, P0442, P0506, P0506, P0507, P0601.


click on the below links for code details.
P0106

P0121

P0171

P0174


P0335


P0340

P0385

P0442

P0506

P0507

P0601.

all of the above codes seem to have a common cause, they all list a bad ecm (computer) as being a cause, and the last code P0601 points specifically to a bad computer. sorry for the bad news, hope this helps.

Dec 06, 2009 | 2000 Cadillac DeVille

2 Answers

Crankshaft Position Sensor Error P0335 recurred after r&r


In the kit there are two sensor that look identical. The one for the crankshaft has a white paint mark on it near the bolt hole. Make sure that it is in the right location.

Jul 25, 2009 | 2003 Nissan Altima

2 Answers

I have a 2000 Mitsu. Galant. Trouble codes p0335 and p0340 for cam and crank sensors.Are there any common problems?


Hi, I found a couple of good articles on those codes. Rather than just copy and paste here are the links:

P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor Electrical Error
http://www.bba-reman.com/content.aspx?content=NEXT_DTC_P0335

P0340 - Camshaft Positio Sensor Circuit Malfunction
http://www.obd-codes.com/p0340

Jan 03, 2009 | Mitsubishi Galant Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine turns but won't start


No.: TSB-07-11-001
DATE: January, 2007
MODEL: 2002-07 Lancer 2.0L
SUBJECT:
HARD TO START ENGINE DTC P0340 (and P0335)

PURPOSE
The engine may be hard or impossible to start and MFI DTC P0335 and possibly P0340 may be stored due to abnormal wear to the camshaft position sensor support. Oil grooves have been added to the camshaft position sensor support to improve lubrication

Nov 04, 2008 | 2003 Mitsubishi Lancer

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