Question about 1999 Volkswagen Golf

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Just had brake shoes replaced. Every time i come to a slow stop i get a sever screeching noise. old drums were not replaced with the shoes. mechanic had a hell of a time putting the drums back on. he didn't machine them..is this a problem, or will it correct itself by wear

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Two things cause this, they used cheap brake pads or shoes or both, they didn't correctly machine the brake rotors on a brake lathe.

Posted on Jun 03, 2009

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ALWAYS turn the drums. He should not have had a hell of a time if he did it right the first time. Go to Napa pay the 10 dollars a drum and get them machined or "turned" like new again. You do not need to replace them in most cases just turn them to make sure they are perfectly circular and not warped from the heat. If they are too far gone then they will need to be replaced but that rarely happens. it will NEVER correct itself by wear, and will ruin your new brakes.

Posted on Jun 03, 2009

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Nov 08, 2015 | 1998 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

Burning smell brakes


Most people do not remove the rear rotors and inspect the Emergency Brake shoes. These often peel off the metal backing on the shoe and jam inside the interior Drum of the rotor. Some people will hear a rusty grinding noise after pulling away from a stop.

These brakes have the old "star-wheel" adjusters and may need to be adjusted more loosely to remove the rotor. Its a bad system in my opinion; the drum always rusts and corrodes and the Ebrake shoes are banana peel thin. With corrosion, the drum acts like a grinder and chews up the brake shoes. Some other configurations use a mechanical link on the caliper to make the service brakes act in an Emergency. It will override a hydraulic failure, but you still need good pads on the caliper.

Mar 17, 2014 | 2000 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

Need illustration for rear drum brakes


Long shoe in the back,ilIllustration is at the bottom of the page for some reason,scroll down!
Click on a part in the image to check price & availability at your local store.print_icon.gifPRINT DIAGRAM1.imageVIEW SOLUTIONS TO COMMON PROBLEMSpartstab.gif

listarrow_icon.gifBrake Shoeslistarrow_icon.gifBrake Drumlistarrow_icon.gifWheel Cylinderlistarrow_icon.gifBrake Lines and Hoseslistarrow_icon.gifBrake Hardwarelistarrow_icon.gifBearings & Sealslistarrow_icon.gifThe Parking Brakelistarrow_icon.gifFlushing the Systemsolutiontab.gif
Select a part to view solution for common problems associated with the item.Operation: Brake shoes provide the friction material that when forced against the friction surface of the drum stops the vehicle. Advice: Check the old brake shoes for uneven wear. Uneven wear from one side of the shoe to the other is an indication of loose or worn brake hardware. Uneven wear from the top of the shoe to the bottom is indication that the shoe is not contacting the drum correctly, usually due to a drum that is beyond wear specifications. Recommendations: Brake hardwareOperation: The brake drum provides the rotating friction surface for the brake shoes to interact with in stopping the vehicle. Advice: Check the friction surface for uneven wear, grooves or small stress cracks caused by excess heat. Uneven wear is an indication of lose or worn brake hardware. Grooves in the friction surface are an indication of brake shoes that have worn down to the metal rivets or brake shoe framework, or of debris lodged between the brake shoe and drum, possibly broken brake hardware. As long as the damage is not too severe, uneven wear can be corrected by resurfacing the drum. Check to make sure that the drum is within specifications before and after the resurfacing. A drum with heat stress cracks should be replaced. Recommendations: Resurface or replace the brake drums.Operation: The wheel cylinder converts the hydraulic pressure sent from the master cylinder into the mechanical force that pushes the brake shoes into contact with the brake drum to stop the vehicle. Advice: Check for moisture anywhere around the wheel cylinder. Moisture is an indication of a leaking wheel cylinder. A leaking wheel cylinder should be either rebuilt or replaced. If a wheel cylinder is allowed to leak brake fluid onto the new shoes, it will ruin the new shoes causing the brakes to grab and emit a growling or rumbling noise when applied. Recommendations: Rebuild or replace leaking wheel cylinders.Operation: The brake lines act as a conduit for the brake fluid, supplying each wheel with the hydraulic action necessary for brake operation. The system is made up predominantly with metal brake lines. Flexible hoses are used at the wheels to accomadate the movement of suspension and steering. Advice: Check metal brake lines for signs of corrosion, physical damage or leakage. Check flexible brake hoses for splits, cracking or signs of leakage. The brake lines are connected to the various brake components with hollow fittings called flare nuts or line fittings. Because flare nuts are hollow they are susceptible to damage if a normal open ended wrench is used to remove them. Flare nut wrenches, sometimes called line wrenches are special open ended wrenches designed to slide over the brake line and still provide maximum grip on all sides of the fitting. Apply a generous spray of penetrating oil to the threads of the fittings and allow it to soak in before loosening the fittings. Recommendations: Flare Nut Wrench set Penetrating sprayOperation: Brake hardware is a term used for all of the springs, clips, guide pins and other misc. pieces that hold the brake pads and calipers in place and guide their movement during brake application. Advice: Check for corroded, bent, worn out or broken springs, guide pins or clips. Damaged or worn out brake hardware can cause uneven wear on the new brake pads. To ensure the best results from your brake job, the brake hardware should be replaced with the new brake pads. Recommendations: Replace Brake hardwareOperation: The wheel bearings support the weight of the vehicle and allow the wheels to spin freely. Advice: All wheels will have some sort of bearing and a seal to hold in lubricant and keep out dirt. Some bearings are sealed in a hub assembly or pressed into an axle housing and can only be serviced by replacing them. Others such as tapered roller bearings can be cleaned inspected and repacked with grease. Use a can of spray brake cleaner to remove the old grease. Check the integrity of the cage holding the rollers in place. A loose wobbly cage is an indication of wear. Check the rollers for discoloration. Discoloration is an indication that the bearing has been subjected to excess heat and should be replaced. Always install a new race when replacing a bearing. Always install a new seal whenever servicing or replacing a bearing. Recommendations: Spray Brake cleaner Wheel bearing grease Wheel sealOperation: The parking brake on a drum brake system has a series of cables that when actuated from the driver's compartment moves the parking brake levers on both rear wheels, forcing the rear brake shoes against the friction surface of the drums to hold the vehicle in place. Advice: With the parking brake disengaged and the drum removed, check to ensure that the brake shoes are fully seated at the top and bottom anchors. If not the parking brake cable may be sticking internally and holding the brake shoes partially applied. A sticking parking brake cable should be replaced. Never adjust the parking brake cable until after normal brake shoe adjustment has been made. After normal brake shoe adjustment if the parking brake still does not hold the vehicle stationary, then the parking brake cable can be adjusted.Operation: Flushing the brake fluid removes old or contaminated brake fluid from the system replacing it with fresh brake fluid. Advice: Brake fluid is a hygroscopic fluid, which means that it is in its nature to absorb moisture from the air. Over time the amount of moisture accumulated will decrease the efficiency of the fluid to act hydraulically. Moisture in the brake fluid can also cause corrosion in the system. Brake fluid should be flushed every two years. Recommendations: Brake fluid

Apr 01, 2012 | 1994 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

I am replacing the rear brakes does any one have a drawing for this


I just find this (click over this link for zoom)...

9_30_2011_3_42_10_pm.jpg

Fig. Exploded view of the rear drum brake assembly - LINK
The rear brakes do not require manual adjustment. Adjust the shoes by sharply applying the brake pedal several times while driving the vehicle alternately forwards and backwards. Check the brake operation by making several stops while driving forward. The self-adjusting mechanism will sufficiently adjust the rear brake shoes without any manual tightening at the brake shoe adjuster. If the rear brake shoes are manually adjusted, the additional action of the brake shoe adjuster can cause the brakes to become over-tightened and result in binding or overheated rear brakes.

Hope this helps.

Sep 30, 2011 | 1998 Mercury Villager

2 Answers

I have a 2004 Corolla with 150000 miles. The rear brake shoes were replaced in April and a couple of months later there was a grinding sound. The mechanic replaced the shoes again and we still had the...


When I replace rear shoes I always replace the mounting hardware. You didn't mention if your shop did this or not so I would suggest doing so. While there, inspect wheel cylinders. If they're wet or 1 side sticks out farther than the other then you may have an issue with a faulty wheel cylinder. If you notice a pulsing or surging movement when you apply brakes you may have a warped drum - other than these, A hands on diagnosis is needed.
Hope this helps!!

Nov 22, 2010 | 2003 Toyota Corolla

4 Answers

I just replaced the rear brakes on my 1998 camry.I used toyota shoes and had the drums turned .now i have a clunk clunk noise when brakes are applied. help!


Did you use exchange shoes, and were they oversize? The shoes must be adjusted very close to the drum to prevent this lock-on from happening, maintain a high brake pedal, and reduce wear. If the adjusters won't bring the shoes out to lock the wheel when adjusting, they are too small.

A word about adjusting drum brakes...Move the adjuster so that each shoe locks the wheel, then back off till you can turn it more or less freely.You may have to have someone stab the pedal for you the center the shoes as they are backed off. You should hear and feel the drag of the shoes. Do this for all shoes on both wheels.

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3 Answers

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1 Answer

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2 Answers

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