Question about 1995 Buick Park Avenue

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Location of Temperature control, 1995 Buick ParkAve.

Cannot control heat or get any cool air from a/c Can run the settings to low of 60 & high of 90, and still receive hot air. Cant find temp control ??? Added freon ( took 18 oz.) Didnt change temp.When i first start engine the digital temp # keeps blinking for a few min. 7 then will stay on # i choose, owner manual said if this happens to see dealer. would like to fix myself if possible.

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Condensor shot

Posted on Jun 02, 2009

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2005 montana sv6 sitting in traffic temp gauge goes up codes P0128 and P0481 present


DTC P0128 Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Below Thermostat Regulations Temperature
An engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor monitors the temperature of the coolant. This input is used by the powertrain control module (PCM) for engine control and as an enabling criteria for some diagnostics.
The air flow coming into the engine is accumulated and used to determine if the vehicle has been driven within the conditions that would allow the engine coolant to heat up normally to the thermostat regulating temperature. If the coolant temperature does not increase normally or does not reach the regulating temperature of the thermostat, the diagnostics that use ECT as enabling criteria may not run when expected.
If the PCM detects the calibrated amount of air flow and engine run time have been met, and the ECT has not met the minimum thermostat regulating temperature, DTC P0128 sets.

P0481
Cooling Fan Relay 2 Control Circuit
PCM
DTC P0480 or P0481

Have you changed the thermostat ?
Do you know how to test cooling fan relay (S)
Battery positive voltage is supplied to the cooling fan 1 relay from the COOL FAN #1 fuse. The powertrain control module (PCM) controls the cooling fan 1 relay by grounding the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit via an internal solid state device called a driver.
Battery positive voltage is supplied to the cooling fan 2 relay and the cooling fan 3 relay from the COOL FAN #2 fuse. The PCM controls the relays by grounding the high speed cooling fan relay control circuit.
When the PCM is commanding a relay on, the voltage potential of the control circuit should be low, near 0 volts. When the PCM is commanding the control circuit to a relay, the voltage potential of the circuit should be high, near battery voltage. If the fault detection circuit senses a voltage other than what is expected, the DTC will set.
The PCM will monitor the control circuit for the following conditions:
• A short to ground
• A short to voltage
• An open circuit
• An open relay coil
• An internally shorted or excessively low resistance relay coil
When the PCM detects any of the above conditions, the DTC will set and the affected driver will be disabled.

Jul 01, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2007 Buick Lucerne CXL: Cooled seats not working. LIghts come on, temperature adjusters work but the motors under the seats do not come on.


Air Circulation
When the heated/cool seat switch is pressed to initiate operation of the climate control seat (CCS) system, cabin air is drawn through the heated/cool ventilation module air filter, then directed through passages in the foam of the seat cushion and seat back to the seat's occupant. In order for the CCS system to operate to its optimum performance, it is crucial to have unrestricted air flow through the system. A dirty or restricted air filter, the blockage of an exhaust air duct, a misaligned heated/cool ventilation module, or incorrect foam installation of the seat cushion or seat back will all have negative effects on CCS operation.
Heated/Cool Ventilation Module
Each heated/cool seat has 2 ventilation modules, one located under the seat cushion and one located in the seat back. These modules are controlled by the climate control seat module (CCSM). Each ventilation module contains a thermo-electric device (TED), a temperature sensor, and a blower motor. The TED and temperature sensor are mounted downstream of the blower motor. Each TED consists of a circuit of positive and negative connections sandwiched between 2 ceramic plates. Each ceramic plate is equipped with copper fins for heat exchange. The air flowing past these fins is either directed as conditioned air into the seat cushion and seat back, or directed into the cabin as waste air.
A TED is essentially a solid state heat pump that is used to heat or cool the air supply to the seat cushion and seat back. When voltage is applied to a TED, one side releases energy as heat, while the opposite side absorbs energy and gets cold. When the polarity of the current flow to the TEDs is switched, the hot and cool sides of the TED reverse.
During the following climate control seat system description and operation, the TEDs, blower motors, and temperature sensors will be referenced independently even though they are all packaged together as a module.
Climate Control Seat (CCS) System
The CCS system consists of two heated/cool ventilation modules and one climate control seat module (CCSM) that controls both the driver and passenger heated/cool seats systems. The CCSM is mounted below the front passenger seat cushion. It receives power from both, battery positive voltage and ignition 3 voltage.
Once a CCS system is activated, cabin air is drawn through the seat blower motors and directed across the fins of each of the thermo-electric device (TED) located under the seat cushion and in the seat back. The air is either heated or cooled as it passes over the TEDs. This conditioned air is then directed through channels in the foam of the seat pad and through small holes in the seat cover to the occupant. Once the system is activated, the CCSM uses a set of algorithms to control the temperature of the selected heating or cooling modes.
Your best bet is to take your vehicle to a qualified repair shop an have it diagnosed .
DTC B19A4: Driver Seat Back Blower Speed Circuit High

DTC B19A8: Driver Seat Back Blower Speed Circuit Short to Ground

DTC B103D: Driver Blower Power Circuit

DTC B272E: Driver Seat Back Blower Circuit Open
DTC B19A3: Driver Seat Cushion Blower Speed Circuit High

DTC B19A7: Driver Seat Cushion Blower Speed Circuit Short to Ground

DTC B2729: Driver Seat Cushion Over Temperature
DTC B19A2: Passenger Seat Back Blower Speed Circuit High

DTC B19A6: Passenger Seat Back Blower Speed Circuit Short to Ground

DTC B111D: Passenger Blower Power Circuit

DTC B272F: Passenger Seat Back Blower Circuit Open
DTC B19A1: Passenger Seat Cushion Blower Speed Circuit High

DTC B19A5: Passenger Seat Cushion Blower Speed Circuit Short to Ground

DTC B272A: Passenger Seat Cushion Over Temperature
Driver and Passenger Heated/Cool Seats Inoperative
  1. Ignition OFF, disconnect the C1 harness connector at the CCSM.
  2. Test for less than 5 ohms between the ground circuit terminal M and ground.
  3. ?‡'
    If greater than the specified range, test the ground circuit for an open/high resistance.

  4. Verify that a test lamp illuminates between the B+ circuit terminal E and ground.
  5. ?‡'
    If the test lamp does not illuminate, test the B+ circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance.

  6. Disconnect the C2 harness connector at the CCSM.
  7. Ignition ON, verify that a test lamp illuminates between the ignition circuit terminal 1 and ground.
  8. ?‡'
    If the test lamp does not illuminate, test the ignition circuit for a short to ground or an open/high resistance.

  9. If all circuits test normal, replace the CCSM.


Sorry

Jul 10, 2016 | 2007 Buick Lucerne CXS Sedan

3 Answers

1999 ford expedition , runs good doesn't overheat , but puts out no heat ?


heater core might need replaced . check the hoses going to it under the hood after it gets to operating temperature .One should be hot and the other not so much

Nov 19, 2015 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I am getting the following codes on my 2002 Nissan Altima v6 3.5 liter P1430, P1420, P1805, P1152, P1102, P1011, P1021 & P1335 I'm going crazy here. Please help!


Definition of Diagnostic Trouble Code P1430 Ford: Electric Air Pump Secondary Lincoln: Electric Air Pump Secondary Mazda: Electric Air Pump Secondary Mercury: Electric Air Pump Secondary Toyota: Intake Constrictor CTRL Circuit Open or Short

Definition of Diagnostic Trouble Code P1420 Audi: Second Air Injection Valve Circ Electrical Malfunction BMW: Secondary Air Valve Control Circuit Electrical Buick: Intake Air Low Pressure Switch Circuit Low Voltage Cadillac: Intake Air Low Pressure Switch Circuit Low Voltage Chevrolet: Intake Air Low Pressure Switch Circuit Low Voltage Chrysler: Register Resonant Charging 1 (RRC1) Dodge: Register Resonant Charging 1 (RRC1) Ford: Catalyst Temperature Sensor GMC: Intake Air Low Pressure Switch Circuit Low Voltage Honda: Nox Adsorptive Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold Catalytic converter Jeep: Register Resonant Charging 1 (RRC1) Lincoln: Catalyst Temperature Sensor Mazda: Catalyst system efficiency below threshold (bank 1) Mercedes: AIR Pump Switch over Valve Mercury: Catalyst Temperature Sensor Oldsmobile: Intake Air Low Pressure Switch Circuit Low Voltage Pontiac: Intake Air Low Pressure Switch Circuit Low Voltage Saturn: Intake Air Low Pressure Switch Circuit Low Voltage Subaru: EVAP Purge Control Solenoid Circuit High Input Toyota: SCV Control Circuit Malfunction Volkswagen: Second Air Injection Valve Circ Electrical Malfunction

Definition of Diagnostic Trouble Code P1805 Ford: Four wheel drive high indicator circuit failure Lincoln: Four wheel drive high indicator circuit failure Mazda: (4WD) High Indicator Open Circuit Mercury: Four wheel drive high indicator circuit failure Toyota: SB Solenoid Circuit Malfunction

Definition of Diagnostic Trouble Code P1152 Audi: Bank1, Long Term Fuel Trim, Range 2 Leanness Lower Limit Exceeded BMW: Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Low Voltage (Bank 2 Sensor 1) Ford: Lack Of Heated Oxygen Sensor Bank 2 Sensor 1 Switches - Sensor Indicates Rich Jaguar: Lack of H02S-21 switch, sensor indicates rich Land Rover: Oxygen sensor response time bank 2.Short circuit to ground Lincoln: Lack Of Heated Oxygen Sensor Bank 2 Sensor 1 Switches - Sensor Indicates Rich Mazda: Lack Of Heated Oxygen Sensor Bank 2 Sensor 1 Switches - Sensor Indicates Rich Mercury: Lack Of Heated Oxygen Sensor Bank 2 Sensor 1 Switches - Sensor Indicates Rich Subaru: Oxygen sensor range /performance problem (Low) Volkswagen: Bank1, Long Term Fuel Trim, Range 2 Leanness Lower Limit Exceeded Volvo: Oxygen Sensor Front, Bank 2

Definition of Diagnostic Trouble Code P1102 Acura: Mass Airflow (MAF) Sensor Lower Than Expected Comprehensive Audi: Oxygen Sensor Heating Circuit,Bank1-Sensor1 Short to B+ Chrysler: HEV Stop Request Performance Dodge: HEV Stop Request Performance Hyundai: MAP Sensor Circuit Low Input Jeep: HEV Stop Request Performance Kia: Heated Oxygen Sensor Bank 1 Sensor 1 Heater Circuit High Input Land Rover: Throttle to air flow plausibility not active.Last occurrence - minimum signal Mazda: Mass Air Flow Sensor In Range But Lower Than Expected Mitsubishi: Traction Control Ventilation Solenoid Circuit Porsche: Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Ahead Of TWC Heater Short To B+ Saab: Front Heated Oxygen Sensor Bank 1, Control Module Input, Current in Pre-Heating Circuit Too High Subaru: Pressure Sources Switching Solenoid Valve Circuit Malfunction Volkswagen: Oxygen Sensor Heating Circuit,Bank1-Sensor1 Short to B+ Volvo: Power Stage Group B

Definition of Diagnostic Trouble Code P1011 Saab: Injector Cylinder 1 Shorting To Ground Toyota: OCV for VVTL Open Malfunction (Bank 1)

Definition of Diagnostic Trouble Code P1021 Honda: Valve Pause System Stuck On Comprehensive Mitsubishi: OCV OPN. Bank 1 Saab: Injector Cylinder 2 Shorting To Ground Toyota: OCV for VVTL Open Malfunction (Bank 2)

Definition of Diagnostic Trouble Code P1335 Audi: Engine Torque Monitoring 2 Control Limit Exceeded Buick: CKP Circuit Cadillac: CKP Circuit Chevrolet: CKP Circuit Ford: (EGR) Position Sensor Minimum Stop Performance GMC: CKP Circuit Infiniti: CKP Sensor (Ref) Jaguar: CKPS Circuit Malfunction Land Rover: Exhaust gas recirculation position sensor minimum stop performance. Lexus: Igniter Circuit Malfunction Bank 2 (During Engine Running) Lincoln: (EGR) Position Sensor Minimum Stop Performance Mazda: (EGR) Position Sensor Minimum Stop Performance Mercedes: CKP Sensor Circuit Malfunction, Bank 2 Mercury: (EGR) Position Sensor Minimum Stop Performance Oldsmobile: CKP Circuit Pontiac: CKP Circuit Saturn: CKP Circuit Toyota: No CKP Sensor Signal Engine Running Volkswagen: Engine Torque Monitoring 2 Control Limit Exceeded http://www.obd-codes.com/trouble_codes/nissan

Jun 29, 2015 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2002 toyota avalon engine check light on P0078 and P007C


P0050 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Control Circuit (Bank 2 Sensor 1)

P0051 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Control Circuit Low (Bank 2 Sensor 1)

P0052 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1)

P0053 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Resistance (Bank 1 Sensor 1)

P0054 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Resistance (Bank 1 Sensor 2)

P0055 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Resistance (Bank 1 Sensor 3)

P0056 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Control Circuit (Bank 2 Sensor 2)

P0057 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Control Circuit Low (Bank 2 Sensor 2)

P0058 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 2)

P0059 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Resistance (Bank 2 Sensor 1)

P0060 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Resistance (Bank 2 Sensor 2)

P0061 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Resistance (Bank 2 Sensor 3)

P0062 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Control Circuit (Bank 2 Sensor 3)

P0063 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Control Circuit Low (Bank 2 Sensor 3)

P0064 HO2S Heated Oxygen Sensor -Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 3)

P0065 Air Assisted Injector -Range/Performance

P0066 Air Assisted Injector -Circuit Malfunction or Circuit Low

P0067 Air Assisted Injector -Circuit High

P0068 (MAP) Manifold Absolute Pressure /(MAF) Mass Air Flow - Throttle Position

Correlation

P0069 (MAP) Manifold Absolute Pressure / (BARO)Barometric Pressure Correlation

P0070 Ambient/Outside Air Temperature Sensor -Circuit Malfunction

P0071 Ambient/Outside Air Temperature Sensor -Range/Performance Problem

P0072 Ambient/Outside Air Temperature Sensor -Circuit Low Input

P0073 Ambient/Outside Air Temperature Sensor -Circuit High Input

P0074 Ambient/Outside Air Temperature Sensor -Circuit Intermittent

P0075 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1)

P0076 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low (Bank 1)

P0077 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High (Bank 1)

P0078 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1)

P0079 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low (Bank 1)

P0080 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High (Bank 1)

P0081 Intake valve Control Solenoid Circuit Malfunction (Bank 2)

P0082 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low (Bank 2)

P0083 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High (Bank 2)
P0084 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Malfunction (Bank 2)

Mar 22, 2013 | 2002 Toyota Avalon

1 Answer

Controls for ac not working on 1998 buick century


see this steps and fix it. God bless you

Start the car and turn the air conditioning on. Allow the engine to run a few minutes so the air can cool. Check to make sure you have the proper buttons selected. This simple step may uncover the root of the problem.

  • 2 Adjust the air controls on the dashboard to see how they are working. If the controls move the way they should with the proper amount of resistance and stopping in the right places but have effect on the air, then the problem may as simple as a blown fuse. If the controls are not working at all, then the problem is in the control panel.
  • 3 Get to the fuse box in a Ford Explorer by removing the instrument panel to the left and slightly below the steering wheel. There is a fuse remover provided in the fuse box. A blown fuse will have a broken wire in it. In a Ford Explorer, this fuse is red number 10.
  • 4 Find the control panel by prying off the top instrument panel around the air conditioning temperature controls. Unscrew four screws, one in each corner, and remove the temperature control panel. Unplug four electrical connectors and one vacuum hose to the control panel.
  • 5 Listen for the blower motor to be properly working while the engine is running and the air conditioning controls are turned to high. Adjust them from low to high to make sure the blower motor noise increases and decrease accordingly.
  • Oct 04, 2012 | 1998 Buick Century

    3 Answers

    I put a brand new heater core, radiator, water pump an thermastat but it still takes forever to blow heat out an then it doesn't get that hot.. what's the problem? my vehicle is a 1995 jeep wrangler 2.5 4...


    Could be the heater bypass valve is stuck or the heater core is blocked.
    I'd check the heater core first.You may have trapped air in the cooling system or the heater core may be partially plugged up. Engine coolant is delivered to the heater core through two heater hoses. With the engine idling at normal operating temperature, set the temperature control knob in the full hot position, the mode control switch knob in the floor heat position, and the blower motor switch knob in the highest speed position. Using a test thermometer, check the temperature of the air being discharged at the HVAC housing floor outlets.
    Temperature Reference
    Ambient Air Temperature 15.5° C (60° F) 21.1° C (70° F) 26.6° C (80° F) 32.2° C (90° F)
    Minimum Air Temperature at Floor Outlet 52.2° C (126° F) 56.1° C (133° F) 59.4° C (139° F) 62.2° C (144° F)
    If the floor outlet air temperature is too low, Both of the heater hoses should be hot to the touch. The coolant return heater hose should be slightly cooler than the coolant supply heater hose. If the return hose is much cooler than the supply hose, locate and repair the engine coolant flow obstruction in the cooling system.
    OBSTRUCTED COOLANT FLOW
    Possible locations or causes of obstructed coolant flow: Pinched or kinked heater hoses. Improper heater hose routing. Plugged heater hoses or supply and return ports at the cooling system connections. A plugged heater core. If proper coolant flow through the cooling system is verified, and heater outlet air temperature is still low, a mechanical problem may exist.
    MECHANICAL PROBLEMS
    Possible locations or causes of insufficient heat: An obstructed cowl air intake. Obstructed heater system outlets. A blend door not functioning properly.
    TEMPERATURE CONTROL
    If the heater outlet air temperature cannot be adjusted with the temperature control knob on the A/C Heater control panel, the following could require service: The A/C Heater control. The blend door actuator.
    The blend door. Improper engine coolant temperature

    Dec 04, 2010 | 1995 Jeep Wrangler

    1 Answer

    Location of Temperature control, 1995 Buick ParkAve.


    Go to your local auto parts dealer and rent a code reader. I would also recommend you buy a Haynes/Chilton book for your specific make/model of car.while your @ the auto store. Extract the code and look up the code in the manual. Then take that information you have from the code reader manual, and look it up in the Haynes/Chilton manual. If you have found this information helpful, please vote for this reply, thanks.

    Jun 02, 2009 | 1998 Buick Park Avenue

    2 Answers

    1993 buick century


    Heater Control Module

    May 31, 2009 | 1993 Buick Century

    1 Answer

    Cooling


    most cooling fans on GM products are set to come on at 212 F. Its temperature input comes from your coolant temperature sensor--to the ECM which closes a relay to turn on the electric fans. Hope this helps.
    Also atleast one of your fans should come on when you turn on your air conditioner that should let you know if your circuit is working.

    Oct 23, 2008 | 1995 Buick Skylark

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