Question about Mazda Tribute

4 Answers

Engine cranks but does not start. No trouble codes. Has spark and fuel. New crank and cam sensors. Computer has been flashed. Complete engine rebuild. When the front three cylinder spark plugs and coils are removed, the engine will start and run on rear cylinders, for about a minute. Timing has been checked and is correct.

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  • 5 more comments 
  • tasoc6 May 29, 2009

    All the trouble shooting has been done. Still nothing.

  • tasoc6 Jun 01, 2009

    Checked those as well and everything checks out. This morning, after the car had sat over the weekend, the car started for about 5-10 seconds then cut off. It doesnt want to start again, still doing the same thing, cranking but not starting. We did notice a strong fuel smell coming from the engine after it started this morning.

  • tasoc6 Jun 01, 2009

    There is no water leak. The engine was completely rebuilt. New head gaskets, hoses, belt, pistons etc. When it starts in the morning, we get a strong GAS smell, not water or coolant. The engine runs for about 5 seconds, then stops. It does not want to start again.

  • tasoc6 Jun 02, 2009

    You can smell fuel, but not really fuel soaked.  Only first thing in the morning when the engine runs for about 5 seconds is when you can smell the fuel.  But like i said before, but you didn't see maybe, is that when the front three cylinder spark plugs and coils are removed the engine runs, for about 30 seconds.   2003 mazda tribute 3.0 dohc.  engine competley rebuilt.  timing correct.  we know now it is not a mechanical problem.

  • tasoc6 Jun 02, 2009

    it is not a nissan..2003 mazda tribute.

  • tasoc6 Jun 02, 2009

    Has compression. Has oil. The engine was completley rebuilt. has spark, has fuel. fuel pump turns on. Engine only runs for about 30 seconds when the front plugs are removed..when the plugs and coils are back on, the engine has a good crank, but no start

  • tasoc6 Jun 03, 2009

    2003 mazda tribute. engine cranks, no start. With just one spark plug and coil removed the engine will run on 5 cylinders, but cuts off after about 10-15 seconds. The O2 sensors are not generating voltage. And the short term fuel is reading at 57-59%, and when cranked that number jumps higher and eratic.

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4 Answers

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  • Master
  • 11,896 Answers

New sensors and no codes.
I would check fuel pressure from fuel rail, check vacuum pressure and engine compression. If you are I also would check all your relays with multi-meter.
Replace fuel filter as well.
If you have spark, than the problem is most likely with the fuel.
How is the module? This is the piece that is connected to coil packs, that wire runs to crank sensor. You should also check this with mutli-meter to make sure resistance remains steady.

Posted on Jun 03, 2009

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  • Mazda Master
  • 6,674 Answers

Have you pulled spark plugs to see if fuel soaked when no-start happens?

Posted on Jun 02, 2009

  • Mike Butler
    Mike Butler Jun 02, 2009

    Can I get year & engine confirmed please?

  • Mike Butler
    Mike Butler Jun 02, 2009

    Unfortunately I cannot see other comments by previous experts, so what they have asked or recommended is unknown to me at this time, so if I repeat something already discussed please be patient with me.

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  • Master
  • 10,515 Answers

Hi,

You must have done most of the troubleshooting but lets start from the scratch.


Follow the below troubleshooting steps :-

http://www.2carpros.com/first_things/car_cranks_but_wont_start.htm

Follow all those and let me know if you find the culprit.

If not, let me know so that we could move further. However, i want to make sure we have gone through all basic troubleshooting.

When done, let me know.

Thanks for using "Fixya".

Do rate the solution as "Fixya" if 100% satisfied.

Posted on May 29, 2009

  • taran_2005
    taran_2005 May 29, 2009

    Hi,

    Have you checked the coolant temperature sensor ?

    If not check and also check the EGR values as well?

    When done, let me know.

    Thanks for using Fixya.


  • taran_2005
    taran_2005 Jun 01, 2009

    HI,

    Probability is you have one of two issues. You may have a small pinhole
    leak or connector leak on the heater or radiator hoses. Sometimes they
    only leak a bit under pressure. Look for steam or drips after you have
    been driving and the engine is still hot. This small loss can be
    smelled but not detected right away in fluid level.

    The other
    (less likely) issue is a small coolant passage leak from the head
    gasket outward. This is a bit more to fix. If the leak smell is not too
    obnoxious to, I would tend to wait an see how it develops.

    Check and let me know.

    Thanks.


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  • Master
  • 355 Answers

Propabilities
- Ingnition totally dead. Is there 12V at coil? Spark? (take wire out, insert any spark plug, ground it, watch for sprk while cranking) ECU drives thsi process...
- No injector pulse from ECU to injectors =no gas to burn...
- Some crucial signal (not sensor) to ECU is down. Ign key sends one. Is the sw worn out?
- etc.


-----------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------


ECU instructions can be best found on Chilton/Haynes manual (20$?), also some places in the net. ECU is located just beside the gas pedal. Try finding info here:

http://www.newshampark.org.uk/bignissansold/j30/

http://www.maxima.org/

http://www.parttrackers.com/library/1/93/104/

Posted on Jun 02, 2009

  • 2 more comments 
  • Rohit  Asthana
    Rohit Asthana Jun 02, 2009



    But if all that is okay, and/or the Check Engine
    light is on . the next logical step is to engage the
    self-diagnostics. Unlike most other carmakers, Nissan has you go right to the ECU
    for this. Remove it from the passenger's side kick panel, then find the
    mode selector screw and the port in the housing through which a red and
    a green LED are visible.




    Switch on the ignition, turn the selector screw clockwise all the way,
    and watch the LEDs. They'll flash once, then pause, twice then pause,
    and on up to five times to indicate the five diagnostic modes. When you
    see the number of the mode you want, turn the screw counter-clockwise.



    *Modes & codes



    Mode 1 is called the "Exhaust Gas Sensor Monitor" because it informs you about oxygen sensor activity. With the
    engine
    running and fully warmed up, the green LED should blink, going on when
    the sensor sends a lean signal and off when it sends a rich signal. You
    should see 5-10 flashes every 10 seconds. If the LED is on more than
    it's off, there's a lean condition, and vice versa. Sluggish blinking
    should make you suspect a fouled sensor.



    Mode 2, the Mixture Ratio Feedback Control Monitor, lets you know whether or not the air/fuel mixture is being controlled within the proper range. If the red and green LED's flash pretty much simultaneously with the engine
    running, mix control is okay. If the red LED is off more often than the
    green one, richness is indicated. If the red is on more than its mate,
    think lean.



    Mode 3 has the name "Self-Diagnostic," and it's more what you're used to on other vehicles because it yields fault codes,
    both hard and intermittent, which are communicated to you by means of
    the flashing of both LED's. The red one gives the first digit, and the
    green one the second digit. For instance, if the red flashes twice,
    then the green flashes once, you've got a Code 21.



    Get the engine up to normal temp, preferably by driving the car for 10 minutes, then pull the codes. In the case of a no-start, crank the engine
    for at least two seconds. If you see 55, all is well (in older models,
    44 meant the same thing). Be sure to write down any other codes because they'll be erased when you go on to Mode 4, which means you will have lost any help on intermittents. Normally, codes are retained in memory for fifty starts.



    Mode 4, called the "Switches On/Off Diagnostic Mode," checks the function of the switches that serve as inputs to the ECU, specifically those for ignition key
    start
    position, idle, and vehicle speed. For the first two, the red LED will
    go on or off when switch status is changed. In other words, with the
    ignition on, the red light should illuminate both when you step on the
    gas pedal and when you turn the key to start. If not,
    check the appropriate circuit. The vehicle speed sensor lights the
    green LED when you exceed 12 mph (get the drive wheels off the floor to
    do this in the shop, or have a helper drive while you keep your eyes on
    the ECU).




    Mode 5 ("Real-Time") gives instantaneous trouble codes to let you know what's going on right now in four monitored circuits. Codes are flashed
    out just once when a malfunction is detected, then they're immediately
    forgotten. And the way you read them is different -- you observe the
    flashing of one LED or the other, the red one reporting on the crank angle sensor and the fuel pump circuits, and the green on the air flow meter and ignition signal circuits.





  • Rohit  Asthana
    Rohit Asthana Jun 02, 2009

    If the red LED pulses out a series of long flashes separated by equally long pauses, a malfunction in the crank angle sensor or its circuit's indicated. Groups of three short flashes of the red LED point to the fuel
    pump or its circuit. With the green LED, two medium flashes followed by
    a pause, then two again, and so on, should cause you to suspect the air
    flow meter and its related wiring. Groups of four flashes mean there's
    a problem with the ignition signal.



    This is an extremely sensitive and very useful mode. You can wiggle
    wires and connectors, rap on components, and have somebody else drive the car while you watch for those fleeting indications of
    trouble. You'll know everything's okay if you see no flashing in five minutes of revving and idling.







    ECU Codes:

    11 Crank Angle Sensor/Camshaft Position Sensor.

    12 Air Flow Meter/Mass Air Flow Sensor.

    13 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor.

    14 Vehicle Speed Sensor.

    21 Ignition Signal.

    22 Fuel Pump.

    23 Idle Switch.

    24 Throttle Valve Switch.

    25 Idle Speed Control Valve.

    28 Cooling Fan Circuit.

    31 ECM.

    32 EGR Function.

    33 Heated Oxygen Sensor.

    34 Knock Sensor.

    35 Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor.

    36 EGR Control-Back Pressure Transducer.

    37 Knock Sensor.

    38 Right hand bank Closed Loop (B2).

    41 Intake Air Temperature Sensor.

    42 Fuel Temperature Sensor.

    43 Throttle Position Sensor.

    45 Injector Leak.

    47 Crankshaft Position Sensor.

    51 Injector Circuit.

    53 Oxygen Sensor.

    54 A/T Control.

    55 No Malfunction.

    63 No. 6 Cylinder Misfire.

    64 No. 5 Cylinder Misfire.

    65 No. 4 Cylinder Misfire.

    66 No. 3 Cylinder Misfire.

    67 No. 2 Cylinder Misfire.

    68 No. 1 Cylinder Misfire.

    71 Random Misfire.

    72 TWC Function right hand bank.

    73 TWC Function right hand bank.

    76 Fuel Injection System Function right hand bank.

    77 Rear Heated Oxygen Sensor Circuit.

    82 Crankshaft Position Sensor.

    84 A/T Diagnosis Communication Line.

    85 VTC Solenoid Valve Circuit.

    86 Fuel Injection System Function right hand bank.

    87 Canister Control Solenoid Valve Circuit.

    91 Front Heated Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit right hand bank.

    94 TCC Solenoid Valve.

    95 Crankshaft Position Sensor.

    98 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor.

    101 Front Heated Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit right hand bank.

    103 Park/Neutral Position Switch Circuit.

    105 EGR and EGR Canister Control Solenoid Valve Circuit.

    108 Canister Purge Control Valve Circuit.


  • Rohit  Asthana
    Rohit Asthana Jun 02, 2009

    Senario 1 engine seized.

    2 need new starter pinion.

    Check if you can turn engine with plugs removed,

    Check the oil how is it.

    Is it in neutral park not in gear,

    if it is turning do you hear the fuel pump,

    Do you have sparks,

    did you check compresion ?

  • Rohit  Asthana
    Rohit Asthana Jun 02, 2009

    check this hyperlink..it will help you in toubleshoot

    www.aa1car.com/library/us1296.htm


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The engine turnes but it wont start.


Free Auto Repair Advice by Professional Mechanics




Troubleshooting / Car Engine Cranks but Will Not Start / Engine Crank But Wont Start 2

* Why does my engine stall at idle?
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* Why does my engine stall?
* Why does the engine stall after replacing the battery?
* Why won't my engine crank over?
* How to retrieve trouble codes
* How to test fuel delivery system
* Engine cranks excessively
* Engine has excessive smoke
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* How to tune up your engine
* How to jump start your engine
* How to test an oxygen sensor
* How to open a car hood
* How a flywheel - flex plate works

Engine Cranks But Will Not Start

For an engine to run, you need three things to happen inside the engine, compression, fuel and ignition, without any one of these components the engine will not run. Follow the repair guide below:


Engine Configuration with Camshaft Operation

*

Compression - Engine compression caused by crankshaft rotation and pistons moving up and down inside the engine block. If the timing belt or timing chain fails it will cause the camshaft to become out of correlation with the crankshaft or allow the camshaft to stop rotating. Either of these conditions will cause the engine to lose compression and sometimes cause internal engine damage.
*

Fuel Delivery System - The fuel system includes: fuel pump, fuel injectors, pressure regulator, fuel filter and pressure lines. This system is used to supply fuel under pressure to the fuel injection system, the lack of fuel pressure or volume will cause the fuel delivery system to fail and the engine to stall or not start.
*

Ignition Spark Delivery System - The ignition system components include: spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor (if applicable), crankshaft angle sensor, camshaft angle sensor, ignition coil, ignition module, knock sensor and PCM (engine control module). The engine relies on the ignition spark to be delivered to the combustion camber at the correct time. If the ignition spark stops or is delivered at the wrong time the engine will not run or run poorly.

If your engine cranks but does not start follow this troubleshooting guide:
* Step 1 - Anytime you have a problem with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) inspect all fuses using a test light and check the under hood power distribution center and under dash fuse panels. If all fuses test ok continue to the next step.
* Step 2 - To check for problems with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) and the fuses test ok a trouble code scan is needed to identify any system trouble. Use a simple scanner tool to retrieve trouble codes and see if they relate to the specific problem, like a crank angle sensor failure code. If the trouble code present does not pertain to the immediate problem like an EVAP code ignore it until a later time, after the car is running. The reason we repair non-related codes after the engine is running is because sometime false codes can be triggered by the engine not running. Once the engine is running again the code present might cycle and turn itself off. You might say "if the engine doesn't run shouldn't it have a trouble code?" Sometimes conditions occur that will not be detected by the computer, example: if the fuel pump fails the computer cannot detect the failure, so the engine doesn't start and the computer thinks everything is ok with no codes. If no trouble codes are present proceed to the next step.
* Step 3 - The spark plugs in your engine are used to ignite the compressed fuel air mixture. If the condition of the spark plugs are fouled by excessive fuel or carbon the engine will not start, backfire or run rough. Remove all spark plugs to inspect their condition. Please use this spark plug condition reference guide to see how the spark plugs are operating.
* Step 4 - Determine if the engine has compression, this can be done a number of ways but the most complete method is to perform a compression check. Remove the spark plugs and perform a compression test on one cylinder. If one cylinder has compression then the remaining cylinders usually will be close to the same. Crank the engine over about 5 seconds, normal compression readings should be between 125 psi and 160 psi on each cylinder. If no or little compression exists additional tests will be needed. The most common reason for an engine to lose compression is a timing belt or timing chain failure. If low or no compression exists remove the oil fill cap and observe camshaft rotation when the engine is cranked over. If no rotation exists the timing belt or chain has failed. If your engine has a timing belt and you cannot see the camshaft easily remove the upper bolts to the timing cover and gain visual access to the belt, recheck cam rotation by cranking the engine over. Sometimes a timing belt or chain can jump causing the camshaft to lose correlation with the crankshaft and therefore causing low compression. The best test for this condition is to remove the timing belt/chain cover and inspect timing marks. If the compression is ok proceed to next step.
* Step 5 - Test the ignition system output, ignition systems can vary in configuration but operate on the same principal. Ignition systems can consist of a coil, pick up coil, crank angle sensor, cam angle sensor, spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, ignition rotor and a distributor and any variations of these components. An ignition coil is a voltage stepper coil that transforms a low voltage (12 volts) signal into tens of thousands of volts needed to jump the gap of the spark plug. This coil is activated by an ignition module triggered by using the camshaft/crankshaft angle sensor; timing is adjusted by the ECM (computer).

Hope helps (remember rated and comment this).

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2 Answers

Audi 100s 1993 cranks doesn,t start, turns over no start. when it starts runs rough and stalls.


could very well be a faulty sensor, leaky vaccum hose, bad coil packs, needing of new fuel filter, spark plugs, wires.

Have you checked your fuel pressure to make sure it is good. You can do this with fuel pressure tester on the fuel rail.

Also check every cylinder for spark
If you don't have any spark, or very weak spark, you could have bad coil pack, module, or crank sensor.

You can remove one plug at a time, and place it back on plug wire, place it on top of engine block, have someone else turn motor over well you observe to see if there is spark.

Do you have a service or check engine light on? If so, I would have the engine codes read to pinpoint exact problem area.

Let me know if you have any questions or need further help

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3 Answers

Engine cranks but will not start


If Your Engine Cranks but Does Not Start Follow this Troubleshooting Guide
Vehicles operate by the same principle; basic troubleshooting procedure applies to most cars.
  • Step 1 - Anytime you have a problem with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS(supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) inspect all fuses using a test light and check the under hood power distribution center and under dash fuse panels. If all fuses test ok continue to the next step.
  • Step 2 - To check for problems with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) and the fuses test ok a trouble code scan is needed to identify any system trouble. Use a simple scanner tool to retrieve trouble codes and see if they relate to the specific problem, like a crank angle sensor failure code. If the trouble code present does not pertain to the immediate problem like an EVAP code ignore it until a later time, after the car is running. The reason we repair non-related codes after the engine is running is because sometime false codes can be triggered by the engine not running. Once the engine is running again the code present might cycle and turn itself off. You might say "if the engine doesn't run shouldn't it have a trouble code?" Sometimes conditions occur that will not be detected by the computer, example: if the fuel pump fails the computer cannot detect the failure, so the engine doesn't start and the computer thinks everything is ok with no codes. If no trouble codes are present proceed to the next step.
  • Step 3 - The spark plugs in your engine are used to ignite the compressed fuel air mixture. If the condition of the spark plugs are fouled by excessive fuel or carbon the engine will not start, backfire or run rough. Remove all spark plugs to inspect their condition. Please use this spark plug condition reference guide to see how the spark plugs are operating.
  • Step 4 - Determine if the engine has compression, this can be done a number of ways but the most complete method is to perform a compression check. Remove the spark plugs and perform a compression test on one cylinder. If one cylinder has compression then the remaining cylinders usually will be close to the same. Crank the engine over about 5 seconds, normal compression readings should be between 125 psi and 160 psi on each cylinder. If no or little compression exists additional tests will be needed. The most common reason for an engine to lose compression is a timing belt or timing chain failure. If low or no compression exists remove the oil fill cap and observe camshaft rotation when the engine is cranked over. If no rotation exists the timing belt or chain has failed. If your engine has a timing belt and you cannot see the camshaft easily remove the upper bolts to the timing cover and gain visual access to the belt, recheck cam rotation by cranking the engine over. Sometimes a timing belt or chain can jump causing the camshaft to lose correlation with the crankshaft and therefore causing low compression. The best test for this condition is to remove the timing belt/chain cover and inspect timing marks. If the compression is ok proceed to next step.
  • Step 5 - Test the ignition system output, ignition systems can vary in configuration but operate on the same principal. Ignition systems can consist of a coil, pick up coil, crank angle sensor, cam angle sensor, spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, ignition rotor and a distributor and any variations of these components. An ignition coil is a voltage stepper coil that transforms a low voltage (12 volts) signal into tens of thousands of volts needed to jump the gap of the spark plug. This coil is activated by an ignition module triggered by using the camshaft/crankshaft angle sensor; timing is adjusted by the ECM (computer).

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1 Answer

My s10 will turn over, but wont squirt gas through injecter


Does it crank? Do you have any codes? Check engine light? Do you have spark? No spark check coil, and connections, also it would be nice to know what year it is. Get codes read. No crank check battery and starter. No codes or lights check crank position sensor, make sure your pcm is good after replacing your ignition mod you could have blown it if you did do it right. (engine computer) Check cam sensor if applies. Crank and cam could prevent it from starting and I know one I think cam controls pcm's fuel delivery on gm's

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