Question about 1996 Toyota Camry

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Will not start

I have a 96 camery 4 cylinder 2.2 liter engine.Took the bottom pulley off to reaplce oil seal. We put the pullesy back on as they came off and set the car back in timing. NOw when tryin to start car will fire once but doesnt attempt to start again. Anyone know what would cause this?

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  • elumbee2005 May 26, 2009

    not sure if the sensor was damaged would that make it where even if in time it wouldn't start?

  • elumbee2005 May 26, 2009

    How would i do a compression test?

  • elumbee2005 May 26, 2009

    whats the best way to build compression in the motor?

  • yadayada
    yadayada May 11, 2010

    DID U DAMGE THE CRANK SENSOR? CHECK THE CONNECTOR TO IT.

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Hi I am Vortash sorry to say I think Joe is correct however you may have now damaged your valves .. check your manual or with a Dealer if your car has a Safe Head if it does that means if the cam is out the pistons do not touch the valves .. however if not you could have just bent your valves or even worse cracked the guides .. with a ratchet on the crank turn the engine over slowly by hand ( not on the starter obviously ) see if you can feel if there is impact don't worry if it happens you will feel it .. the piston may stop and will not go any further on it's stroke . If it did turn freely then you will need to reset your timing as Joe said above refer to your manual how to do this .. and then once that is done you need to do a compression test if the vehicle still wont start .. once you have set the timing turn it by hand again to make sure everything is clear and you get no impacts .. f you find that you have had a valve impacted then you need to strip off the head and take it to an engineer for pressure testing he will then be able to tell you if any other damage was done and if the head suffered crack damage due to impact with the pictons .. once the head is off you will see on top of the pistons if there is signs of impact damage if there is the pistons will need to be removed and checked for damage at the Gudgeon pin or Little end .. Here's hoping none of this is needed and your car is not damage like this fingers crossed for you .. Regards Vortash

Posted on May 26, 2009

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  • clive pearson
    clive pearson May 26, 2009

    Please excsue my typing I can spell but at times can't control my fingers lol .. I would never have made a typist my legs are far too hairy lol regards Vortash

  • clive pearson
    clive pearson May 26, 2009

    Hi a compression tester can be purchased or hired from a local auto accessories shop for around $30 it will be a gauge with a stem that screws into the cylinder ... Normal readings are around 130 to 150 psi for a standard engine or for the none numbered type in the green area of the dial .. further in the green the better .

    After checking that you have no impact obstructions by turning the crank by hand with a ratchet on the main crankshaft nut ( main pulley ) with all other plugs in remove a plug and insert gauge then crank the engine on the starter ( if the car has been standing for any length of time drop a tablespoon amount of oil into the pot via the plug hole to oil cylinder ) , do this in turn to each cylinder .. Remember the timing has to be accurate for this test to be successful .. this test is also good for testing cylinder head gasket leakage..... Regards Vortash

  • clive pearson
    clive pearson May 26, 2009

    Thanks Joe appreciated vortash

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Sounds like somewhere one shaft moved and did mess up the timing. You might have to open the bell housing sight window for the timing marks and reset the entire timing system marks to marks, then use a timing light to fine tune it.

I heve been here and done that and Im sorry to say you may have to do it as well. Igf you have the shop manual just look up timing and how to reset it.

Hope this helps.

Joe

Posted on May 26, 2009

  • Joe Russell
    Joe Russell May 26, 2009

    Wow vortash I completly left that part out.. :( good save as I believe you may be right sorry to say.



    Joe

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If you've filled it with 7 quarts it's overfull. Way too full. Check your oil dipstick - remove it, wipe it clean and then dip the oil level. At the bottom of the dipstick there is a flattened wider part. The oil level should not be below the bottom of this marker, and nor should it be above it. If the oil level is way above the flattened marker bar - you're overfull and will have to drain some oil out of the engine. An overfilled engine will try and blow oil out from wherever it can as the oil system will over-pressurised.

Ok .. so there's no problem with the engine compression. The crankcase isn't overfilled with oil (the crankcase is known as the oil sump in the UK). There's no oil fouling of the plugs and the car isn't burning oil, just leaking it. There's no misfires or running

If the engine isn't overfilled with oil there may be a problem with a broken/sticking piston ring or piston/cylinder. That high oil loss you mention seems severe. A problem with a piston/ring/cylinder can allow the compression to leak past the rings/piston into the engine oil sump and pressurise it. Under pressure, the oil will try and leak to atmosphere from anywhere it can.

A blue smoky exhaust is also an indication of piston/ring problems. A quick check is to start the car. If there's a cloud of blue smoke at start up which clears quickly, it's like to be worn valve guides. If, when driving the car with a warm engine there's blue smoke on acceleration - it points to a problem with rings/piston.

A quick check is to remove the spark plugs. Is there engine oil on one or more of them? An oiled up plug indicates that the engine oil is finding its way up past the rings/piston - and if oil can find its way up to a spark plug, then exhaust gasses/compressed fuel/air can find its way into the engine oil sump and pressurise it.

Another quick check is to start the engine and remove the oil dipstick. If fumes are 'chugging' out of the tube or oil is spitting out, that's another sure-fire sign that the oil sump is becoming pressurised due to a piston ring/piston/cylinder problem.

If you possess or can borrow an engine compression tester there is a further test you can do yourself to confirm whether or not there are piston/ring problems. Basically, a compression tester is just a gauge that screws into the cylinder head in place of the spark plug.

Warm the engine for 5 minutes so that the pistons expand fully in the bores.
Remove the spark plugs
Fit the compression tester into No1 cylinder and crank the engine for 10 seconds. Make a note of the compression reading on the gauge.
Do the same for each cylinder.

Here's an example of what you might find (the figures are for example only)
Cylinder Reading
1 115
2 120
3 118
4 95
5 96
6 117

Figures vary, but there should not be more than a 10% difference between the readings.
In the example above you can see that cylinders 4 and 5 have readings that are well below those of the other cylinders. This is indicating problems within those two cylinders. The lower compression could be due to a head/gasket fault or piston ring/piston problem. A split or worn exhaust valve in the head may cause low compression, a misfire and uneven running but it won't cause the engine oil sump/crankcase to pressurise. Now, some fine tuning to locate the exact problem:

Put a liberal squirt of oil into each cylinder - something like Redex, WD40 or engine oil.Put a cloth over each spark plug hole and spin the engine to get rid of the excess oil. The idea is that the oil you have squirted into the piston bores will form a 'seal' around the outside of the piston/rings.

Do the compression tests again and note the readings. If the readings go up significantly it indicates that the rings/pistons/bore has a problem. Readings that go up significantly are due to the oil forming a seal around the piston which raises the compression whilst testing. Here's an example:Cylinder Reading on 1st test 2nd test
1 115 118
2 120 121
3 118 120
4 95 110 Significant rise - more than 10%
5 96 98
6 117 119

Ok .. all this means is that cylinder 4 has compression problems due to the rings/piston/bore. The 2nd compression reading (with the oil squirted in) is higher simply because the oil formed a seal. Cylinder number 5 still has a low reading which didn't increase significantly on the 2nd 'wet' (when oil is added) test. This suggests that the problem is an exhaust valve/head gasket/head problem.

If there had been no significant increase in the reading on number 4 cylinder, this would suggest valve/gasket head problem. Low readings on adjoining cylinders (and which don't increase with the 2nd compression 'wet' oil test) would indicate a faulty head gasket between those two cylinders.

I'll continue this article ... ran out of word space

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